Hot Topics and New Bits

Leadership Gap: 3 Steps to Fix the Unintended Trouble You Create

What happens when leaders don’t communicate clearly and completely? Some say that team members rise to the occasion. They engage and start leading. It’s possible. I’ve seen it. Yet it’s not the norm.

Others say that rumors surface and confusion grows.  People disengage and morale suffers.  It’s possible.  I’ve seen it often.

The key question is how can leaders prevent the confusion of the leadership gap and communicate to engage?


Leadership Gap: Image is Large Question mark w/ trails of dots behind.

Leadership Gap: Fixing Unintentional Trouble You Create Image by Stefan Baudy via Flickr.

Image by Stefan Baudy via Flickr Creative Commons License.


3 Steps to Close the Unintentional Leadership Gap

  1. Write down your assumptions that created the last unintentional leadership gap in communication. Did you assume that everyone understood what you said? Did you think they would ask questions if they didn’t? Did you assume they would raise concerns and voice disagreement?

    Fix: Clarify all your assumptions out loud with those you lead. Ask for their feedback. If you are leading teams from other cultures, find out how they normally interact with leaders. In some cultures, it is not OK to speak up.


  2. Note when the leadership gap seems to occur? Is it when you communicate with your peers or their teams? Is it in crises? Is it in routine situations? Or is it pervasive and frequent?

    Fix: If your leadership gap is routine, pervasive and frequent, write down your definition of leadership. You may be suffering from the myth that modern leadership is faceless with the leader being in the background.



    Fix: If your leadership gap occurs during crises, you may be focusing on the problem solving to the exclusion of communicating what’s going on. Do both!


    Fix: If your leadership gaps occur with your peers or their teams, you are most likely skipping the socializing step. This often happens to driver type leaders and passionate visionary leaders. They assume everyone has the same zeal for their beliefs and they jump to the end.  When they get to the end zone, they realize no one is there with them.
    Take time to build consensus through listening and discussion to arrive together!


  3. Ask others to help you spot your unintentional leadership gap.  They will likely experience the gap before you see it.  Their experience at the moment becomes your awareness and cue to change. To lead and communicate well, you must be aware and adapt to close the leadership gap.


Lastly, remember that leadership is not about telling or asking. It’s knowing when to do each. Too laid back and you break the chain of success. Too overbearing and you break morale and engagement. Both lead to unintended and unforeseen trouble.



What other ways do leaders create a leadership gap & what’s your advice to them?

 

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership Success: Think Balance Beam Not Mountain Top
18 Things Respected Well-Liked Leaders Consistently Do

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Positive Workplace Behaviors is our People Skills Global Chat Topic

WHEN: Sunday Aug 2, 2015 at 10AM EDT on Twitter. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Background on This Chat Topic: Positive Workplace Behaviors

People go to school and learn occupational skills like finance, business, science, computers etc… When they set out on their careers and get jobs, they also must have great people skills and positive workplace behaviors. Please JOIN us Sunday Aug. 2, 2015 10amEDT in people skills global Twitter chat to share your insights and experience on positive workplace behaviors and people skills.



Positive workplace behaviors: Image is People skills logo

Positive workplace behaviors: Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Your Work Persona: Positive Workplace Behaviors

What makes others want to work with you and be around you? How do positive workplace behaviors make you a stellar employee and teammate? JOIN us in #Peopleskills global Twitter chat to explore positive workplace behaviors.

Here are some questions to get us thinking in advance. Actual questions will post live during the chat.

  • Prior to my first “career” job, I pictured workplace interaction as __________.
  • When you first entered the workforce, what was workplace interaction like?
  • How would you describe your work persona?
  • How would your co-workers describe you and the affect you have on them?
  • What goes into how co-workers see each other?
  • What positive workplace behaviors breed org. success?
  • When do positive workplace behaviors get tested? Why?
  • How do great leaders foster these positive workplace behaviors?
  • How do emotional intelligence and positive workplace behaviors relate if at all?
  • Opinion: Schools should put more focus on teaching positive workplace behaviors. Y/N Pls. explain.
  • What people skills are most important in the workplace?
  • How can people develop their own positive behaviors and people skills?
  • What advice would you offer to those just entering the workforce?


So bring your personal perspective, your favorite beverage, and join the people skills global chat community this Sunday Aug. 2, 2015 10am EDT in Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills) about positive workplace behaviors.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global chat community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, and LinkedIn. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your individual insights.

Special thanks generous chat moderators Dave Moore, Jandis Price, Chantal Bechervaise, Hoda Maalouf, and Tom Rhodes for their time and insightful contributions.






Hope you will all join People Skills Global Chat on Twitter #peopleskills this Sunday Aug. 2, 2015 10am EDT/7am PDT to discuss positive workplace behaviors and people skills.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Twubs.com or Tweetchat.com, enter hashtag #peopleskills, and sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Chat with you this Sun. Aug. 2, 2015 10am EDT in People Skills Global Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) TOPIC: Your Work Persona: Positive Workplace Behaviors.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Teamwork Persona: Will Others Want to Work With You?

Colonel Pamela Melroy, former NASA space shuttle commander, recently asked a very telling people skills question during her career mentoring talks at the space and science festival on the Intrepid Museum.



Are you someone others would want to spend two years with?


Young adults in school, new entrants into the workplace, or experienced workers changing careers, often overlook this question. They focus on developing occupational skills. Yet the people skills and team skills are the aspects that answer Colonel Melroy’s question. It took more than science smarts to be in space with others.


Teamwork Persona: Image is teammates working on a creative project.

Teamwork Persona: Are You Someone Others Want to Work With? Image by Creative Sustainability via Flickr.

Image by Creative Sustainability via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Teamwork Persona: Are You Someone Others Will Want to Work With?

Start developing your teamwork persona early on and never stop. Your people skills and teamwork skills determine if others want to spend time with you. Here’s a checklist to guide you.

  1. Flexibility and affability. What behaviors do you exhibit that make it easy to get along with you? What traits or behaviors will you develop to make it even easier?

  2. Reliability. Do you bring all your talents and abilities to work every single day? Do you shine or retreat in tough times?

  3. Honesty not bluntness. Do you communicate with honesty and care? Are you straightforward without being blunt? Your teamwork persona will attract others when you are easy to understand without being hurtful.

  4. Collaboration. How do you react to this word? Do you want to scream out, “I’m highly competitive!” If you did, would others want you on their team? Something to think about.

  5. Confidence not arrogance. How do you come across? Teammates want your confidence. It lightens the load. They don’t want your arrogance. It increases the load. Make a list of behaviors that you believe express confidence and those that show arrogance. Ask others how you come across. Work on the first list and eliminate the second! This is how you improve your teamwork persona.

  6. Moderation of extremes. Most everyone has some extreme behaviors. It could be habits you’ve developed or traits that have evolved. The key question is: Can you moderate them so they don’t burden others?

  7. Courage and humility. Work requires both depending on the situation. When pressure mounts, how do you act? When conditions require some restraint, can you do that well?

  8. Respect. Showing respect to and for others is essential to a great teamwork persona. It is the basis for all teamwork.

  9. Integrity. The ultimate factor in whether people will want to work with you. Trust is everything.


Developing your occupational skills is the normal career path. Developing your teamwork persona will lead to incredible career success. Start now!



What would you add to this teamwork persona checklist?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
21 Reasons People Don’t Get Along at Work
5 Extremes That Harm Teamwork
Moderation Doesn’t Mean Mediocrity

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Seeing Beauty in Others is our People Skills Global Chat Topic

WHEN: Sunday July 26, 2015 at 10AM EDT on Twitter. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Background on This Chat Topic: Seeing Beauty in Others

Beauty is often defined for people in society. Yet beauty is infinite and diverse. Famed fashion photographer Rick Guidotti decided to break society’s cycle of telling people who is beautiful and set out to capture the true beauty in everyone. As I watched his video, I was very moved. How we define beauty guides how we interact. It touches others deeply. Please JOIN us Sunday July 26, 2015 10amEDT in people skills global Twitter chat to discuss seeing beauty in others.



Seeing Beauty in Others: Image is People skills logo

Seeing beauty in others: Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Seeing Beauty in Others: Beyond Social Norms

When society narrowly defines beauty, it shortchanges everyone. It robs the world of the potential of everyone’s beauty and all that it can create. It breeds bullying, isolation, and pain. JOIN us in #Peopleskills global Twitter chat to explore true beauty — beyond our societal norms.

Here are some questions to get us thinking in advance. Actual questions will post live during the chat.

  • What is beauty?
  • How do narrow definitions of beauty emerge?
  • Why do narrow definitions of beauty take hold in society and people’s minds?
  • What does it take to find and love our own beauty?
  • How do narrow definitions of beauty affect people’s lives?
  • Do narrow definitions of beauty affect workplace interaction? Pls. explain.
  • How does beauty affect human interactions in life and business?
  • “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” Ag/Disagree? Why?
  • Can a society’s definition of beauty breed bullying? Y/N Pls. explain?
  • If different countries define beauty differently, how does that impact their interaction?
  • What do you find beautiful in others? Does society celebrate it?
  • How can each of us help others celebrate the true beauty of diversity?


So bring your personal perspective, your favorite beverage, and join the people skills global chat community this Sunday July 26, 2015 10am EDT in Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills) about seeing beauty in others.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global chat community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, and LinkedIn. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your individual insights.

Special thanks generous chat moderators Dave Moore, Jandis Price, Chantal Bechervaise, Hoda Maalouf, and Tom Rhodes for their time and insightful contributions.






Hope you will all join People Skills Global Chat on Twitter #peopleskills this Sunday July 26, 2015 10am EDT/7am PDT to discuss seeing beauty in others.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Twubs.com or Tweetchat.com, enter hashtag #peopleskills, and sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Chat with you this Sun. July 26th, 2015 10am EDT in People Skills Global Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) TOPIC: Seeing Beauty in Others — Beyond Stereotypes & Social Norms.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Creativity Culture: How to Create Safe Open Engagement

Three years into running people skills global Twitter chat, I am thrilled with how many strangers from around the globe come together and engage openly. Recently, one newcomer said he was grateful I had created a safe open place to interact.


His gratitude made me reflect on what I had done and what others did to make this happen. Here is what we did to create an open creativity culture! It applies to workplaces as well.



Creativity Culture: Image is graphic with word creativity.

Creativity Culture: Keys to Creating Safe Place to Engage. Image by Sweet Dreamz Design via Flickr.

Image by Sweet Dreamz Design via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Creativity Culture: 7 Keys to Create Safe Open Engagement

Leaders and managers can do much to create a safe open place for everyone to engage and create.

  1. Create a simple powerful rule about respect.

    Respect is the key to feeling safe to engage, share, and create. In people skills global Twitter chat, we use one rule: Respect even when we disagree. Civility doesn’t weaken the message. It helps others to hear it.


  2. Listen!

    One of the strongest ways to show respect is to listen. It doesn’t mean obey; it doesn’t mean agree. It says respect for all.


  3. Ask questions to understand vs. judging people to discount ideas.

    We open our minds through questions and discussion. Assessing and deciding comes after that.



  4. Celebrate diversity.

    Applaud very different ideas. Appreciating diverse views doesn’t mean we agree. It means we are open to learning and creating.


  5. Moderate extremes.

    Moderation doesn’t mean mediocrity. It means balancing the needs of many in your creativity culture. If we see moderation as mediocrity, we seek excellence only in extremes — and miss the brilliance in between. Extremes spring up from strong vision and mission, predominance of any one personality type, and high pressure points.


  6. Encourage self-awareness.

    Help everyone identify their own pet peeves and own them. Help them see their talents and brilliance and share them. With this step, you replace a shortage mentality with one of abundance and curiosity.


  7. Identify slip ups early.

    The first six keys mean little if we don’t use them. This means spotting slip ups early on and calling everyone to a high level again.


Fostering a creativity culture where it’s safe to engage is not difficult. If we can bring strangers from around the globe every Sunday morning to engage in people skills Twitter chat, leaders and managers can surely foster the same thing in smaller teams. As long as they see it as important to interaction, they can make it happen.



Your View: What would you add to this list on creating safe open place to engage?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Post:
Innovation Leadership: Make It Easier to Innovate Than to Complain
Moderation Doesn’t Mean Mediocrity
Leadership: Do You Seek Excellence Only in Extremes?

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Be Treated Respectfully: How to Respond to Disrespect

What would you say to someone who is disrespecting you? How would you respond to pushy people who show no consideration for your view?

Would you take offense, get angry, and tell them off? Would you say nothing and simmer in anger? Would you walk away and avoid them in the future? There is a better way.



Be Treated Respectfully: Image is hand up in front of the sun.

Be Treated Respectfully: Set Limits w/ Pushy People Image by: _RedHeat

Image by _RedHeat via Flickr Creative Commons License.


How to Set Limits on Disrespect & Be Treated Respectfully

There are many ways to behave in the face of disrespect. In one off interactions, you might ignore it realizing you will never see that person again. You value your serenity and believe in yourself so why bother with it.

Yet when it happens with people you will be around frequently, ignoring disrespect can undermine healthy relationships. You overlook it, remain silent and one day your anger erupts when you’ve had enough. The offender then says “why didn’t you tell me sooner?”



To respond to disrespect and be treated respectfully …

  1. Calmly and firmly say: “Stop. You will not speak to me that way” or “Stop. Please do not speak to me that way.”
  2. Continue with: “I show you basic respect. I ask the same in return.”


If the offender is your boss at work and you cannot respond this way, calmly say: “You have my full attention even without yelling. I am actually more productive that way.” It’s respectful; it communicates commitment; it educates them on your needs.

In both instances you have a dual purpose: Set limits and be treated respectfully. The bonus is that you help others see beyond their own needs. Picture this image of mutual respect and communicate with calm confidence.



Be Treated Respectfully: Image is handshake.

Be Treated Respectfully: Image by Casa Thomas Jefferson via Flickr.

Image by Casa Thomas Jefferson via Flickr Creative Commons License


Confident communication is key to being treated respectfully. Initially the offenders may claim you took it the wrong way. Others may apologize to you and thank you for telling them (yes it does happen). Either way, you have set limits by showing respect for yourself and them — not by yelling. It works.




What successes have you had in setting limits? Please share with us!



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Are You Brutally Blunt or Helpfully Honest
The Perfect Apology and the ONE Word That Destroys It
11 Steps to Being Authentic Without Scaring People Away

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.


QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Leaders and managers, have you ever wanted to tell employees to grow up? You’re not alone. Even companies as a whole report that recent graduates and new hires don’t have sufficient critical thinking and teamwork skills. These are but two aspects of employee maturity. 


The truth is, for employees to contribute maturely leaders and managers must mentor a mature understanding of the business and of the collaboration needed to succeed.


Saying “grow up” won’t do it. Reflecting what you want them to do is the first step to great mentoring. Ask yourself what were they doing that brought you to say grow up? Itemize what you want them to do.



Nine Chances to Cultivate Maturity Image by:J.G. in S.F.

Image by JG in SF via Flickr Creative Commons License.

9 Chances to Cultivate Employee Maturity

Maturity is about balance, readiness, consideration, and confidence. It’s about attitudes as well as skills.

  1. When addressing employee concerns and complaints, always speak about the impact on the business. Today it’s popular to focus on changing the workplace to engage employees. If you want maturity in the workplace, balance caring for them with expectations of them.

  2. Illustrate the difference between honesty with diplomacy and rude bluntness. The former is a sign of maturity for it balances the message and the impact when selecting the words. The latter is a sign of selfish immaturity.

  3. Applaud, highlight, and reinforce excellence. When you set and reward a high standard, you mentor and develop that level of mature commitment. If you treat basic behaviors (like meeting objectives or showing up on time) as something special, you keep many in the weeds.

  4. Replace the misguided adage “treat each other like customers” with the more mature team mantra “grow and change to reach a shared success and common goal”. Team maturity has a deeper honesty and type of trust that surpasses that of a business and its customers. Cultivate it from the beginning and you cultivate maturity.

  5. Frequently ask, “what are we each doing to be ready for tomorrow?” When leaders pose this question, it asks employees to initiate some of their own growth. It is a call to maturity. Provide training and opportunities for them to develop further.

  6. Within a certain sphere, make it OK to make mistakes. Confidence grows when mistakes are lessons learned. Sometimes maturity comes from jumping a hurdle and knowing how to prevent a crash next time.

  7. Maturity owns the impact of behavior. Show them how to do it even in difficult moments. Related post: The Perfect Apology and The ONE Word That Destroys It.

  8. Give them access to situations that cultivate a mature open mind. In silos, employees continue to focus on their own jobs or possibly on the silo they are in. When you break through the silos and have employees see the bigger picture, their view of their own job matures. Now they can contribute to the whole not just to the silo..

  9. Think out loud. Employees learn critical thinking by hearing it and participating in it. If you want to speed this aspect of maturity, show them how you arrive at decision vs. just telling them the decision.


Most of all leaders, continue to evolve your self-awareness and maturity. Your growth spurs theirs. It expands this list of nine chances all the way to infinite. Highlight and applaud growth. You get what you focus on. If you want employees to stretch and grow, recognize and reinforce growth. If you focus only on results, who are you actually leading and mentoring to achieve those results?



What other ways can you develop employee maturity?



From my experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Employee Appreciation: Be a Buoy to Be Appreciated
5 Immature Extremes That Harm Teamwork

©2011-2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.


QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Team Dynamics: Extremes That Harm Teamwork People Skills


Team Dynamics: Image is stormy waters on rocks.

Team Dynamics: 5 Extremes That Harm Interaction & People Skills

Image by Daniele Berlucci via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Team Dynamics: Eliminate These 5 Extremes for Great Interaction

  1. Labels and fixed definitions. Sometimes team members thinking gets stuck on labels and fixed definitions. As teams try to innovate and deal with change, individuals who think literally or hold on to their fixed definitions unsettle team dynamics. Example: I wrote a blog post, Holacracy: Why Employees Like Hierarchy, and two people lectured me on how I didn’t understand holacracy. They were stuck on a fixed definition of holacracy and couldn’t see past it. If they did that to their colleagues in a team meeting, you can imagine the tension between those who were stuck in their definition and those who wanted to explore the topic.

  2. Gotcha behavior. Leaders and team members who revel in pointing out others’ mistakes damage trust. Some even go so far as to set people up to see if they make mistakes. If they do, the gotcha gang points out their errors. They then take credit for educating them. Trust and team dynamics suffer.

  3. Sidelines driving. Picture one team member handling a difficult situation. Other team members who are not directly involved criticize from the sidelines. Share your knowledge but don’t tell others what to do. It’s not just what you say that matters — it’s how you say it. Team up don’t gang up!


  4. Hearing either/or when it doesn’t exist. Team interaction thrives on great listening. When team members hear and think either/or when others are not saying it, it harms team dynamics. Example: In a Twitter #DareToBe chat on curiosity, I tweeted “self-reliance fuels a curious mind.”

    Someone responded directly to me, “I respectfully disagree. Collaboration feeds curiosity, helps it grow, deepens questioning.” Interesting comment. I never said, “self-reliance, alone, fuels a curious mind.” She heard an either/or that I never implied. I believe there are many things that fuel curiosity and I nicely tweeted that back to her.


  5. Absolutes and know-it-all behavior. Rigid team members who insist that their views or positions are right damage team dynamics and results. Their behavior is the opposite of teamwork. Great listening and adaptability is the hallmark of positive team dynamics.



How can leaders help teams prevent or minimize these extremes? Invest time in having the team define positive team behaviors. Discuss what to do if extremes develop. Use team role plays to help each team member become more accountable for their own extremes and self-correct them. I would be pleased to deliver these sessions and work with your teams on positive team dynamics.


Your turn: What other extreme behaviors damage interaction and team dynamics?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
11 Steps to Be Authentic & Not Scare People Away
Leadership: 18 Things Respected Well-Liked Leaders Consistently Do

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.


QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Customer Experience: How to Improve It Quickly


Customer Experience Quick Improvements: Image is light shaped curve.

Customer Experience Quick Improvements. Image by Sam Delong.

Image by Sam DeLong via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Customer Experience: 6 Ways to Improve It Quickly

  1. Improve your welcome. That first impression sets the tone for the customer experience. As a brand, pick one word that defines how you want to come across to customers. Then have every employee the customer with a welcome that matches that image. The image is memorable so make it great.

  2. Listen for what the customers are not saying. You are already listening to what they are saying. To improve customer experience quickly, hear what they are not saying. It wows the customers and gives them the extra connection they love so much.



  3. Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™


  4. Think ‘yes’ and ‘how to’ vs. ‘that’s not the way we do it here.’ Customers don’t come to you to follow your process. They come to experience what they want!

  5. Ask how are we doing instead of how did we do! Every moment of customer interaction is a moment to learn and improve. Take the customer’s pulse sooner. Their vital sign is your vital sign.

  6. SHOW customers you care. They cannot observe your intentions. The experience is in the doing. It comes alive with your actions — not in what you are trying to do.

  7. Be very open to feedback. Any time you feel frustrated or annoyed with customer complaints, ask yourself: Would you rather they complain or leave without telling you why? Complaints are a sign of continued interest — the lifeblood of any business.



As a customer, what customer experience improvements do you want to see?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Customer Experience: 24 Tips to Make It Easy & Valuable
Irresistible Customer Experience: What Every Customer Wants
Irresistible Customer Experience: DOs & Don’ts Part II

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 
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Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Leadership Success: The Real Challenge is Balance Not Achievement


Which one of these images do you picture when you think of leadership success?



Leadership Success: Image is cross beams in tall building.

Leadership Success: Balance Beam Not Mountain Top. Image by Ben Rogers via Flickr.

Leadership Success: Not Just Mountain Top






















For many it is getting to the mountain top. Everyday phrases like, at the top of your game and reach the summit, express what many believe about leadership success.

They focus on initiative and drive which are necessary and valuable. Yet the real challenge in leadership — and life — is balance. Achievement is easy compared to balance.


Leadership Success: Think Balance Beam Not Just Mountain Top

  • Consider the greatest challenge for most businesses — managing growth. This is an issue of balance: projections, investment, supply, demand, etc… Yet many continue to act as if they’re still in start-up mode and focus on climbing to the top.

  • Consider one of the greatest global challenges of any business — optimizing diverse cultures. This too is about balance. Understanding, embracing, and adapting to all factors that can enhance or topple success.

  • Developing high performance teams is about balance. Leaders must get diverse personality types, occupations, ages, and educational levels to work together.

  • Engaging employees for ownership, accountability, and commitment, requires balance. Leaders must balance telling and asking. Great leaders know when to do each.

  • Balancing humility and signs of outward strength is essential. Too much strength and leaders seem domineering. Too much humility and they seem weak. If you struggle with the idea of humility in leadership, read: Never confuse humility for humiliation.

  • In communicating to improve employee engagement and commitment, leaders must balance candor and care. High level leaders often need to add more care to their candor. Front line leaders often need to add more candor to their care.



Unfortunately, somewhere many have learned that focusing on balance is the same as maintaining the status quo. It isn’t! When you have balance, you can move faster, perform better, and adapt to change more easily — without tumbling down.


Essential list of things to balance for leadership success:

  • Intuition and data
  • Safety and risk
  • Big picture and details
  • Creative thinking and critical thinking
  • Practicality and inspiration
  • Reflective listening and active expression



What else do leaders need to balance? Please add your perspective to this list.



You can ascend and master the balance beam of leadership success. Develop it throughout your career long before you have the title of leader!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Moderation Doesn’t Mean Mediocrity!
Leadership Success: 18 Things Respected Well-Liked Leaders Consistently Do

Mountain top image licensed via Istock.com.
Balance beam image by Ben Rogers via Flickr Creative Commons License.

©2012-2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.




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Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Introverts and Extroverts: People Skills Global Chat Topic.

WHEN: Sunday June 21, 2015 at 10AM EDT on Twitter. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Background on This Chat Topic: Interaction Between Introverts and Extroverts

There are many myths about introverts and extroverts as well as challenges when they interact. JOIN us Sunday June 21, 2015 10amEDT as we explore communication between introverts and extroverts.



Introverts and Extroverts: Image is People skills logo

Introverts and Extroverts: Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Introverts and Extroverts: Myths, Truths, and Interaction

JOIN us in #Peopleskills global Twitter chat to explore interaction between introverts and extroverts.

Here are some questions to get us thinking in advance. Actual questions will post live during the chat.

  • What is an introvert? Extrovert?
  • I identify myself as an introvert, extrovert, or ______________. Why?
  • I am happiest when ____________________.
  • What are some assumptions about introverts and extroverts?
  • Where is extroversion helpful? When is introversion helpful?
  • They say opposites attract. Is this true w/ introverts and extroverts?
  • What are some advantages of interacting w/ people different from you?
  • What are the challenges of interacting with different types?
  • How can introverts and extroverts learn more about each other’s type and preferences?
  • Considering personality type and job success, are there certain jobs that are a better fit for each? Pls. explain.
  • How do people skills help you adapt to different types?


So bring your personal perspective, your favorite beverage, and join the people skills global chat community this Sunday June 21, 2015 10am EDT in Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills) on introverts and extroverts.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global chat community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, and LinkedIn. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your individual insights.

Special thanks to generous chat moderators Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Jandis Price, Chantal Bechervaise and Tom Rhodes for their time and insightful contributions.






Hope you will all join People Skills Global Chat on Twitter #peopleskills this Sunday June 21, 2015 10am EDT/7am PDT to share insights on introverts and extroverts.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Twubs.com or Tweetchat.com, enter hashtag #peopleskills, and sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Chat with you this Sun. June 21st, 2015 10am EDT in People Skills Global Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) TOPIC: Interaction Between Introverts and Extroverts.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.


QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Leadership Agility Remember: Consistency & Agility Are NOT Enemies

Leaders, when you think of agility do you picture inconsistent results? Perhaps you picture lack of logic, erratic changes, and confusion. If yes, you may well be thinking that consistency and agility are opposites — even enemies. They aren’t. Yet thinking they are can be the enemy of your enterprise’s success.



Leadership Agility: Image is a slinky.

Leadership Agililty: Consistency & Agility Are NOT Enemies. Image by Tim Ebbs via Flickr.

Image by Ma Tim Ebbs via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Leadership Agility: Consistency & Agility Are Not Enemies

How do managers and leaders go astray? They often mistake consistency for constancy (everything staying the same) or uniformity (everyone and everything being the same). Then they see leadership agility and consistency as opposites, even enemies.



Business conditions change. Customers’ needs change. Business goals change. Workforce trends change. Keeping everything in the business the same — constant and uniform — is enterprise suicide.



Leadership agility fosters consistent success by …

  • Consistently communicating in a clear way
  • Consistently engaging employees ideas
  • Consistently encouraging innovation
  • Consistently igniting collaboration & thinking
  • Consistently creating high quality results


Leaders surrender leadership agility to constancy and uniformity because …

  1. Agility and change feel uncertain
  2. It is easier to reproduce the known than to create the unknown
  3. Constancy and status quo feel less risky
  4. Uniformity is easier to measure


HOWEVER




Keep leadership agility alive in everyday ways:

  • Seek different views.
  • Uncover status quo assumptions with excellent questions.
  • Replace the statement “the process is” with the intelligent question “how does the process apply here and how should we change it?”
  • Don’t put a process in place to deal with an immature workforce. Processes won’t make them mature or create success. Engage them, teach them, ignite their thinking. Processes can’t replace the success of thinking.



Leadership agility creates consistency of success. Never confuse it with constancy and uniformity.


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership Agility: Is Habit Stopping You?
Leadership Agility: Persistence vs. Resistance to Change
Being Process Driven Squeezes People Out

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.




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Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Change Leadership: How to Sustain Morale When Aborting a Difficult Project

When you read this title, you might be inclined to think everyone would be relieved to see the difficult project disappear. Why would you need to address and sustain morale? In very difficult projects, employees who endure and perform well do so with deep commitment. When you pull the plug and abort the project, their morale can crash.



Change leadership addresses morale to re-inspire employees for the next challenge.



Change Leadership: Image is an electric cord unplugged.

Change Leadership: Addressing Morale When You Pull the Plug

Image by Kipp baker via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Change Leadership: What do employees feel and how can you help them?

When a very difficult project is cut short, the employees who were truly committed can feel:

  1. Used like rats in a maze
  2. Sacrificed for nothing
  3. Cheated from the finish line
  4. Unappreciated for their extra effort
  5. Failure and responsible for it
  6. Angry over being excluded from the decision

If you want your change leadership efforts to be successful in this moment, you must address these feelings and what leads up to them.



What Happens to Employees Psychologically During a Very Difficult Project

Employees who rise to a difficult challenge, endure, and perform well do so by believing that:

  • Nothing is impossible
  • Teamwork can conquer any challenge
  • Sacrificing their comfort and personal time will be worth it at the end
  • They will all share in the sweet rewards of success

In other words, they rule out the possibility of failure to keep themselves going. Think of the US Marines motto: “Surrender is not in our creed.” Many times employees have subconsciously adopted this belief. Then suddenly you abort the project and their morale crashes.



Change Leadership: Steps to Address Morale

  • Most importantly, communicate through the project so that employees’ expectations adjust along the way. More information, more reality, less shock.
  • Do not blame the team. Sometimes leaders will blame a whole team when slackers slowed success. Yet great leaders address under-performers along the way. They don’t wait and they don’t blame the whole team.
  • If possible, let them be involved in or at least have access to the decision making process.
  • Draw everyone together and discuss what has happened. Often issues were beyond their control. Get their thoughts. Highlight the talents and efforts applied and ask them to add their kudos of each other to this discussion.
  • In a separate team meeting, discuss the lessons learned. If you do the lessons learned in the first meeting, they may interpret it as “failure analysis”. Much better to let them heal with a celebration of talent and then look at lessons learned after that.
  • Use this change to explore, teach, and develop the team’s agility. I can help you with this!


Great change leadership stems from emotional intelligence that inspires and cares for employees. It’s not fluff. It’s the tangible steps to re-inspiring and re-engaging employees after a crushing blow. Pull the plug without unplugging employees’ drive and resilience!



Your Turn: What other change leadership actions will sustain morale?



How can these difficult moments build a team’s agility?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts
10 Ways to Ignite Greatness Without Leaving Scars
Thriving in Change: 7 Certainties to Replace Every Regret
5 Steps to Develop Emotional Intelligence

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.


QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Experience Dull Empathy or Strengthen It?

Former customer service agents and tech support reps often have empathy for current customer service and technical support teams. They remember the pressure and are considerate. It begs the question: Why do many customer service and tech support agents lack empathy for customers? Do they forget what it feels like to be a customer?

Likewise, does a leader’s current experience dull empathy toward their teams? Have they forgotten what it’s like not to be in charge?


Should knowledge and experience make it easier to give empathy?

Or Does Knowledge & Experience Dull Empathy?

 

Experience Dull Empathy: Image is T-shirt saying You're Stupid.

Experience Dull Empathy?

Image via Amazon.com


Does Knowledge & Experience Dull Empathy?

Knowledge and experience can blind customer service agents and tech support reps to customers’ …

  • Emotions when needing help
  • Fear of not knowing
  • Frustration of being delayed in lengthy procedures
  • Impatience with being routed and transferred
  • Anger at being trapped in the maze of customer support
  • Vulnerability of having to trust others with their success



Likewise, power, knowledge, and experience can blind leaders to employees’

  • Challenges of understanding leader’s vision
  • Struggles of accomplishing goals without authority
  • Personality type differences
  • Quest to acquire knowledge and experience to perform well
  • Pressure of dealing with under-performing teammates
  • Implementing solutions with limited time and resources


Experience and knowledge deliver confidence and a sense of control — the very things that reduce fear, stress, and obstacles.   Unfortunately for some leaders and for some customer service agents, their knowledge and experience dull empathy. Add the pressures of leadership and the stress of customer service work to the picture, and it makes them even less empathetic toward those they lead and serve.


Consider: When you are under incredible pressure do you care less about other things that normally bug you?  You just want to get rid of the big pressure and you overlook everything else? But what if those other things are still very stressful to those you lead and serve? Can you find it in you to empathize with them? Or does your knowledge and ability to fix the trouble bring you to label them as emotional or stupid? In these moments, your knowledge and experience dull empathy.



The best customer service reps overcome the dulling effects of knowledge, experience and pressure by:

  1. Being aware of how they feel outside of work when they are customers
  2. Remembering to focus on one customer at a time. This focus delivers empathy
  3. Realizing that their job is to deliver a wonderful experience while solving the problem. It isn’t just to solve the problem
  4. Embracing the true role of service and support — to make life easier for the customer and get them productive again



Respected well-liked leaders deliver empathy by asking themselves: What does it feel like to be this employee right now? Although knowledge and experience dull empathy in other leaders, they live by the motto …




Don’t let your knowledge and experience dull empathy. Channel your experience into empathy that spurs success in those you lead and serve!


Your turn: What else blocks empathy & how can you overcome the block?


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leaders, Are You Helpfully Objective or Actually Indifferent?
Empathy & Integrity: 5 Keys to Rebuild Customer Trust
18 Things Respected Well-Liked Leaders Consistently Do

©2012-2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

End Bullying is People Skills Twitter Chat Rally – Sunday May 31, 2015 10am EDT.

Hashtag: #peopleskills

Here’s a time converter to assist all of you around the globe in converting 10am ET to your local time.

Background on People Skills Chat – Rally to End Bullying

Once each quarter we dedicate our #Peopleskills global Twitter chat hour to end bullying.

In this rally, we use our intellect, hearts, and voices to explore the more subtle aspects of bullying to end it in its tracks. Please spread the word and invite others to join us on Twitter Sunday May 31, 2015 10am ET using Hashtag: #peopleskills.


End Bullying: Image is People skills logo

End Bullying: Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


People Skills Twitter Chat – Rally to End Bullying

Bullying continues to affect everyday life in deep ways. It changes organizations, leaves scars on individuals, and creates a culture of negativity even hatred. Think about all the positive moments we miss in this life because of bullying. Let’s explore the more subtle aspects of bullying so we can make strides to end this plague.



Here are some questions to get us thinking in advance …

  • What picture does bullying bring to your mind?
  • How do you define bullying?
  • What mindset(s) drive bullying?
  • Why does it persist?
  • We often think of bullying as physical. What are the more subtle types?
  • How do conflict and bullying differ?
  • How are gossip and bullying connected if at all?
  • Societal pressures: Do they feed bullying?
  • Is there any correlation between resistance to change, groupthink, and bullying?
  • What steps can we take in the workplace to define and reduce bullying?
  • Can people skills make a big impact to end bullying? How?



Final versions of these questions will post live during the chat. If you cannot attend this Sunday at 10am ET, please help us promote it on your social streams with hashtag #Peopleskills. Many thanks!

End Bullying: Image is sign stop bullying.

End Bullying: JOIN #Peopleskills global Twitter chat rally!




So bring your heart and your focus and join us from around the globe this Sunday in people skills global Twitter chat — May 31, 2015 10am ET (Hashtag: #peopleskills) — our online rally to end bullying.


We have one rule in People Skills Chat: Respect even when we disagree.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining our Google+ People Skills Community, our Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and our LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to contribute and learn 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Outs of Gratitude

Continued thanks to generous people skills community moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Jandis Price, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes for their time, generosity, insight, and contributions.




Thanks to all committed community members who participate in our people skills global Twitter chats (#peopleskills) and online groups. Last, but not least, a warm welcome to newcomers who continue to join our community.






Hope you will all join People Skills global Twitter chat #peopleskills this Sunday May 27, 2015 10am ET/7am PT for our online rally to end bullying!







How to Participate
If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tchat.io, Tweetchat.com or Twubs.com, enter hashtag #peopleskills, and sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Chat with you this Sun. May 31, 2015 10am ET in People Skills global Twitter Chat (#peopleskills), for our online rally to end bullying.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

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