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Super Customer Experience: Don’t Imprison Customers. Build Loyalty!

As we work tirelessly to deliver super customer experience, I find and fix common everyday mistakes that drive customers away.

Recent experiences focus me today on ways we imprison customers which do everything but build loyalty. You might think imprisonment is too strong a word. Yet that is the word customers use.

Give customers a get out of jail free card — fix these mistakes!



Super Customer Experience: Loyalty not Imprisonment



Ways We Imprison Customers!

  1. Endless Loops. This is definitely #1 on the customers list. Beyond the endless unclear phone menus (voice response units – VRUs, IVRs), customers also feel imprisoned by agents, reps, and CSRs with poor people skills and little customer service expertise.

    The Story: A business owner needed to become a credit card merchant. The sales rep was clear, focused, and offered a great deal. The business owner signed up. The sales rep reported that the support team would send an email with account # and temporary password. Support would then call to finalize everything.

    Super Customer Experience: Loyalty Not Imprisonment! Image: iStock for Editorial Use.

    The business owner received a phone message from support saying “By now you have received your email with account # and password. Please call me, Mindy, at this phone number and extension.” The business owner left Mindy a message saying “We never received the email. Please let us know what to do now.”

    Mindy left a second, third, and fourth message saying the exact same thing as her first message! When the business owner finally spoke on the phone with Mindy, she continued to say “you should have received the email by now.”

    Imprisonment: The business owner finally said, “Time is money. Move me forward or I will cancel my account.”

    Customer service is forward not stagnant. To customers, stagnant feels like imprisonment.

    Release customers from scripted speeches, lack of expertise, and status quo prison! For a super customer experience, move them forward to the solution.

    Question: Where in your organization do customers get stuck in the status quo?


  2. Lack of teamwork. Multiple teams engaged in service with little or no teamwork leave customers trapped in a maze. Customers must jump between teams to get a solution or jump out of the maze and choose freedom. This is imprisonment. It doesn’t build customer loyalty.

    For super customer experience, deliver a single point of solution not multiple points of failure. Build teamwork with shared technology, mutual service level targets, and one service culture.

    Question: How many teams in your organization must work together to deliver a super customer experience? Do they all give it the same priority? If not, customers end up imprisoned in the maze.


  3. Tunnel vision. A less evident yet still common mistake, thinking only from the company or agent perspective. Super customer experience requires seeing things from the customer’s view. Else the customers feel ignored and overlooked — imprisoned in solitary confinement.

    Cultural tunnel vision in global service leaves customers in the dark.

    Rigid script reading and poor listening slam the door shut.

    Poorly designed Websites drive customers away — to well-designed easy-to-use sites.

    Shine the light of customer awareness throughout your organization to free customers from the imprisonment of your procedures and processes.

    Question: Where in your organization is tunnel vision blocking super customer experience? Expand the vision. Replace the tunnel with bridges to the customers and to your success.


Customers want information and solutions that meet their needs. Online, in person, or on the phone, they seek positive easy experiences to get what they want. Imprisonment is not positive nor easy. It makes them want to break out and run away from the stress to find success elsewhere.




Think bonding — not bondage.



Think about the customer not about you!



I look forward to working with you, leaders, and your teams to create super customer experience.

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
24 Tips to Make Customer Experience Easy for Customers
Customer Experience: Paying the Bill Should Be Easy Not Confusing

©2012-2016 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Leadership Influence: See Inspiration not Manipulation

I was surprised when some professionals at a conference reacted negatively to the word influence. They associated it with politicians who try to sway opinions their way. They saw influence as manipulation and even lying. That’s quite a departure from the often held view that “leadership is influence.” ~ John C. Maxwell



How do you see leadership influence — positive or negative?



Leadership Influence: Image is poster saying everyone is an influencer.

Leadership Influence vs. Manipulation: Image by BK via Flickr.

Image by BK via Flickr Creative Commons License


Leadership Influence vs. Manipulation

Each person is an influence for good or bad. Great leadership influence isn’t about convincing people to think their way. Leadership influence creates a picture and invites others to see it through their own eyes. As everyone shares their views, they influence.

Manipulation …

  • Disregards other’s views and talents.
  • Is opportunistic and driven by selfish gain.
  • Hints/tells vs. discovers.
  • Spins and skews the truth their way.
  • Withholds information to further their angle and purpose.
  • Focuses on people who can serve them; ignores those who can’t.


Leadership influence …

  • Discovers and seeks to understand not to convince.
  • Stimulates other’s influence.
  • Asks and listens vs. tells.
  • Honors emotions doesn’t play on them.
  • Respects people for who they are.
  • Awakens a vision so everyone can influence the results with their talents.
  • Ignites diverse views and opens minds for mega collaboration.
  • Transcends the moment and echoes resilience far and wide.
  • Draws on professional people skills to balance communication and care.
  • Uses honesty and restraint so people can come to a decision vs. being told what to do.


Instead of labeling all leadership influence as manipulation, see what true influence is. It honors and inspires. It connects and creates. Then embrace it. Model it. Participate in it!


Question: How do manipulators affect others – short & long term?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
18 Things Respected Well-Liked Leaders Consistently Do
Collaboration: Seek Opportunities, Cut Opportunists

©2016 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 


QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Conquer Listening Barriers: Do You Get Stuck on Keywords?

Most everyone can list out common listening barriers. Surrounding noise, anger, and fatigue always make the list. You can conquer listening barriers like these with rest, settling the anger, and quieting the noise. There is one listening barrier that often operates without your awareness.



Getting stuck on keywords that you frequently hear.



Conquer Listening Barriers: Image is a head blindfolded w/ book attached.

Conquer Listening Barriers: Unstick from Keywords. Image by Cliff via Flickr.

Image by Cliff via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Conquer Listening Barriers: Unstick from Keywords

Think of words that immediately capture your attention. Do they also trap your listening because you’ve heard them so often?

Example:

As I teach technical support teams how to conquer listening barriers with customers, I give them this frequent customer request to assess:

The customer says, “I had trouble logging in all morning. Now I’m logged in and this isn’t working.” A few listen to whole description and aren’t blocked by the keywords ‘trouble logging in’. They work to understand what isn’t working.

Several get stuck on those keywords and mistakenly work on getting the customer logged in. Not surprisingly, the customer gets frustrated and upset.

—–

Conquer Listening Barriers of Keywords

  • List the keywords that most often trap your listening.
  • Question yourself when you hear those keywords to stop your assumptions.
  • Restate what you think you’ve heard. Other’s feedback helps conquer your listening barriers.



What keywords have blocked your listening?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:

Listening Beyond Our Boundaries
Listening Responsibility: 5 Reasons People Interrupt Us

©2016 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Be Resourceful Not Lucky: 15 Ways to Overcome Challenges

In part one of Be Resourceful Not Lucky I outlined 5 steps to start finding your resourcefulness. Now that you’ve begun, here’s the pathway to go further and keep it going.



Be Resourceful Not Lucky. Image is the words Persevere.

Be Resourceful Not Lucky Part II. Image by Sweet Dreamz Design via Flickr.

Image by Sweet Dreamz Design via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Be Resourceful Not Lucky Part II – 15 Steps to Go Further!

To be resourceful, let your mind expand beyond your current thinking and your actions beyond your normal pattern.

  1. Look at objects from different angles. Here’s a helpful post 37 Extraordinary Ways to Use Everyday Objects Differently.
  2. Collaborate to learn various ways to be resourceful. It shows you views you’d never consider. Collaboration is a stronger path than you might think!
  3. Replace the desire to be perfect with the desire to learn. Trying to be perfect can block experimentation — the key to learning and resourcefulness. Perfectionism is a disease not a goal.
  4. Let need ignite your initiative and creativity. As the old saying goes, necessity is the mother of invention — and resourcefulness! Ask yourself, how can I solve this problem with whatever I have?
  5. Stretch outside of the moment — backward and forward. When I was in grammar school, a science test had the question: Which blood cells are associated with iron? I didn’t remember the teacher ever teaching this. Instead of guessing, I remembered a TV commercial for an over-the-counter drug that increased the iron in your blood. It showed faded blood cells that turned red. I picked red blood cells and got it right. Be resourceful not lucky!

  6. Look at the pieces if the big picture overwhelms you. Anytime you feel overwhelmed, unfreeze your mind by finding parts you recognize. Problem solve from there.
  7. Recombine and reapply what you already know. Your mind is a treasure trove of knowledge, experience, and insights. If you combine all of that in different patterns, the possibilities are infinite.
  8. Focus on essentials not extras. With ideal conditions and limitless resources, you can easily create the extras. When times are tough, pare down your list. It quiets the noise and chaos. Be resourceful and create the essential results.
  9. Picture yourself as well-known inventors from different eras. Inventors see a problem and invent a solution. What would Thomas Edison do? How about Joy Mangano the inventor of the Miracle Mop and Huggable Hangers? Visualizing yourself as an inventor can awaken your resourcefulness and creativity.
  10. Let scarcity ignite your resourcefulness. Modern trends are to reduce scarcity by going into debt. In decades gone by, people addressed scarcity with resourceful thinking and creative actions. Take that path and you develop lifelong resourcefulness.

  11. Consciously break your patterns and habits. Long before a problem presents itself, get used to doing things differently. Then when an unsettling moment arrives, you will be resourceful not afraid. Take change consultant Alli Polin’s advice, Rock your boat.
  12. Know the difference between persistence and resistance to change. When you start something do you find it almost impossible to let it go and try another approach?

    Remember, there are three parts to resourcefulness: initiating, persisting, and re-initiating. Don’t get stuck on any one! Persist when you sense potential; innovate when you sense futility.


  13. Make the ‘what if’ your friend! What if breaks you out of your tunnel vision. It invites others to be resourceful with you. It tells the brain to rethink as new information floods in. Here’s more on The Magic of What If.
  14. Set a resourceful goal. What will you do each day or week or develop your resourcefulness. Write down a goal and work toward it. It saves it from the well-intention forgotten wasteland of resolutions.
  15. Celebrate resourcefulness, yours and others. Resourcefulness can become a habit and even a way of life. See the value and the fun. Celebrate it and you will renew it every day.


To be resourceful, tap your creativity, confidence, courage, persistence, flexibility and desire to succeed. Whether you find your resourcefulness in logic, a desire to help others, survival instinct, the push to win, or the fun of creativity, you will expand your life for the better. When you are resourceful you thrive in change and your agility keeps you vital and relevant.


Be resourceful not lucky!

What would you add to this list on how to be resourceful?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2016 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Super Customer Service People Skills: Prevent Regret!

Super customer service has little room for regret. What we say to customers and how we say it leave lasting impressions. We can wound them with scars that last forever or we can use caring people skills to avoid laying an egg.

Super Customer Service People Skills: Image is Blue Egg w/ Letter R

Super Customer Service People Skills: Reverse Regret

Image licensed from Istock.com

In tough moments with customers, how can we speak with great people skills instead of regretting and hoping for that elusive second chance? Responding with care instead of defensively reacting is much easier when we are thinking about the after effects.

Instead of regretting, envision what you would write in a letter of regret and say that instead of your emotional reaction. Super customer service requires people skills that deliver care even in the toughest moments!


Super Customer Service People Skills – Prevent Your Regret!

  • Find empathy by imagining regret.

    The stress relief you feel by snapping at a customer is short lived. It is quickly followed by regret for your outburst. Reverse the regret process and feel empathy from the beginning. In tough moments, adapt don’t attack.



  • Imagine the caring you not the ego-controlled you.

    Many regrets are born of the need to be right, the need to be better than, the need to be selfish. In other words, regrets are born of the ego.

    Imagine yourself being great in service not needing to be right.

    Those who deliver super customer service, revel in helping others to succeed and thus they succeed. Their desire to care overrides their ego. They are humble enough to learn from the customer and don’t feel humiliated by the customer. They don’t say things to customers that they will regret for they envision receiving that very same care.


  • Prevent regret.

    Treat customers well the first time else there may not be a second time. Defensive thoughts and communication lead to regret. Stay open. Show empathy. Explore the customer’s view. Empathy doesn’t mean you agree. It means you matter, we matter, this matters! Through empathy you find how to wow each customer with care.


The old saying, the customer’s always right, has led some to rebel and claim it isn’t true. From there, they justify confronting the customer and saying things to prove the customer wrong.

The debate about that adage is out-of-date and quite worthless. What we all need to remember is that we may not get a second chance from customers we’ve treated badly. Think about it: Why would anyone pay money to be treated with impatience, rudeness and disrespect?

Empathize, explore, and stay open to customers’ views. Live no regret about customers for there may be no second chance to get them back.



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
5 Ways to Stay Calm and Caring w/ Rude or Angry Customers
7 Ego Actions to Avoid for Great Leadership, Teamwork, & Customer Service
Super Customer Service: Be a Buoy

©2013-2016 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

7 Ego Actions That Stifle or Harm Others

As people interact in the workplace, egos sometimes clash. Other times the ego actions are one-way and the damaging results are hidden. In either case, low emotional intelligence has left a vacuum and ego actions filled it. The results can be disastrous for leadership, teamwork, and customer service.




Ego Actions: Image is the word EGO spelled out.

Ego Actions That Stifle Leadership, Teamwork, Service. Image by: Bexx Brown

Image by BexxBrown via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Ego Actions Checklist: Are Any of These 7 Damaging Your Workplace?

  1. Hoarding knowledge. When leaders or team members don’t share their knowledge, ego has become more important than anything. Tip: Leaders, assess what if anything in the culture or in your leadership may be feeding or tolerating this behavior.
  2. Exerting experience over input. In leadership, teamwork, and customer service, claiming your experience supersedes input from others is ego gone wild.
  3. Exerting goals over interaction. When people want to interact while achieving a goal and you refuse, your ego is screaming “I matter, you don’t.”
  4. Asserting dominance instead of collaborating. Example: A patient saw a surgeon about a lump they discovered on their own. The surgeon recommended an ultrasound. The radiologist who did the ultrasound told the patient it was inconclusive. When the patient requested to consult with the surgeon again, the radiologist blurted out: “The surgeon does what *I recommend.” The patient left that practice and found one where “ego wouldn’t get in the way of my survival.”
  5. Telling an upset customer, “I’m trying to help you.” Insight: Delivering superior customer service is about the customers emotional needs, not the reps. The “I am trying to help you” statement is a plea to customers to be nicer. Yet when reps become frustrated like this, their egos can sabotage success. Keep it simple. Make customers feel better, solve their problem, and their upset will disappear.
  6. Wrapping up in a label. Whether you are labeling yourself or others, ego actions are at play. Labels declare. They feel safe. They protect vulnerability from shining through. Examples: “I’m a techie, not a psychologist.” “You’re overly emotional.” “You always …”
  7. Needing to have the last word. Nothing screams needy ego more than always needing to have the last word. This need is one of the ego actions that drives people away. They feel it’s futile to interact with someone who has an insatiable ego.


Jump start great interaction with this list. Have your teams add to the list. Identify where the ego actions are stifling leadership, action, and customer service. From there everyone can discuss how to replace ego actions with more productive behaviors.


What harmful ego actions would you add to the list right now? Why?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Career Success: Are You Rocking w/ These 13 People Skills?
How to Survive Ego Driven Toxic Leaders
5 Steps to Develop Emotional Intelligence

©2016 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Leadership Dilemma: Self-Serving Team Members

One of my customers, a strong leader, described this leadership dilemma to me:

A team member who produced results with the other team members had fallen very ill. Let’s call this team member “Reach”.

When the leader approached the team members for a show of empathy, cards, flowers, and other help for “Reach”, many team members quietly avoided the subject and some clearly declined.

Leadership Dilemma: Image is a skyscraper type structure.

Leadership Dilemma: Self-Serving High Performing Team Member Image by: ErickGonzalez50

Image by ErickGonzalez50 via Flickr Creative Commons License.


The concerned leader asked me to speak with the team members to learn more about the situation and what he had missed. He wanted to know how to lead better in the future. I agreed and asked the leader to think about his definition of teamwork.

Inside the Team Members’ Perspective

  1. Reach was well-known for saying things like: “Always associate with people better than you to achieve success.” The team members wondered who Reach was referring to? Meanwhile, they perceived Reach overlooking them while always looking up.

  2. Reach helped himself grow — he didn’t help others to grow. He was also well-known for saying, “people give and help because they want to. They shouldn’t expect anything in return.”

  3. Did they ever speak to the leader about Reach’s attitude? Two team members reported they had separately spoken to the leader who refocused the discussion on Reach’s work contribution and results. As they compared notes of the leader’s outlook — which they shared with the rest of the team — they all felt is was futile to raise the subject again with the leader.

  4. How had they been able to produce results with Reach while having these negative feelings? Interestingly, they had completely shut out personal feelings for Reach and focused only on results.

  5. When the leader approached them for empathy, cards, flowers and other help for Reach, they were shocked. They had accepted the leader’s results only focus and said they felt both confused and betrayed by his call for personal help for Reach. Neither Reach nor the leader had cared about them. They asked me: What is the leader’s definition of teamwork? Purely getting the job done or caring for and helping each other to get the job done?


I reported my findings to the leader (without identifying who said what). The leader was stunned to learn that the team members saw Reach as a self-serving opportunist. I asked the leader for his definition of teamwork? He told me he always believed that teamwork included caring and helping each other to grow.

When I asked him about results only focus regarding Reach, he confessed he didn’t know what else to say/do when the team members came to him about Reach’s attitude. He didn’t see himself as a psychologist. He faced a leadership dilemma and quickly fell back into a traditional results only focus.


Leadership Dilemma: People Skills Lessons Learned

    Results only focus has at least one benefit and one risk. The short term benefit is clear. The risk is blindness to plummeting morale that can affect future work results.
    Fear can mesmerize and stop a leader from growing. The team members had courageously approached the leader; the leader panicked in fear and took the easy way out — avoidance.
    Awareness and listening are critical leadership skills. Reach was well-known for saying things that this leader never caught. Even if Reach hadn’t said them in front of the leader, team members reported it to him. He then got stuck in his leadership dilemma.
    It isn’t enough for a leader to let the team define teamwork. The leader must contribute to the definition. The leader is part of the team. They all must live it. The leader’s expectations of teamwork are critical in difficult times. It replaces a leadership dilemma with shared definitions and successful actions.


What other lessons do you glean from this leadership dilemma?

What else stops leaders from addressing opportunistic team member behavior?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership Dilemma: Can You Spot Self-Serving Mavericks?
Teamwork Productivity: 21 Reasons People Can’t Automatically Get Along
Teamwork Persona: Are You Somone Others Want to Work With?
18 Things Respected Well Liked Leaders Consistently Do


©2016 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Workplace Personality Conflicts: Results Beat Revenge

In a previous post on people skills for social media greatness, I highlighted specific well-intentioned behaviors that can offend and block success.

One reader commented that anyone can get offended so it’s a wash. Getting even is fair play, right? No, not right. It’s a sad descent into workplace personality conflicts that are very avoidable with professional people skills.



Workplace personality Conflicts: Image is boxing gloves.

Workplace Personality Conflicts: Seek Results Not Revenge. Image by: Istock.com

Image licensed from Istock.com

There are serious business consequences to employees seeking revenge instead of results. Perhaps the biggest one is missing out on what teams can achieve with professional people skills vs. the resulting isolation of workplace personality conflicts.



Workplace Personality Conflicts: Seek Results Not Revenge

Tugs-of-war over personality styles stifle communication — the instrument of success. Leaders who realize the power of coaching employees through workplace personality conflicts also realize great long term results. They don’t let differences isolate team members and block success.

These leaders address silent tugs-of-war and more active workplace personality conflicts.

  1. Who does the adapting? Everyone. When employees approach you with issues of communication style differences, coach all to adapt to reach great results.

  2. Which one of the personality types produces the best results in business? None of them. Business is complex. It involves people with different occupational views. These people have different personality and communication styles. It is the fusion of natural talents that delivers results.

  3. What is the difference between a tug-of-war and a lively disagreement of ideas? Tugs-of-war are not productive. Active discussions of differing views are. Tugs-of-war strive to maintain position to win. Active discussions explore and adapt to achieve a shared success. Teams and organizations succeed when employees adapt to and work with different communication styles not battle over which communication style is right! Strive to be excellent, not right.



The Questions That Transform Workplace Personality Conflicts

When personality style differences appear, ask yourselves:

  • What can I learn from this person?
  • How will I grow from working with this different style?
  • What results can we achieve through this diversity that we can’t without it?
  • How can I move toward results while still respecting the other persona’s views and personality style?
  • How can I best ask for respect of my style while still contributing to the end results?
  • What common ground do we have that we can elevate for success?
  • How can we communicate well even with all our differences?


High performing teams share an incredible desire for results. Revenge toward each other is not their motivator. They contribute their skills, knowledge and talent. They flex and adapt to turn diversity into golden nuggets of success.

Inspire them to flex and adapt. Book the Quick Spot & Adapt™ workshop. By moving past the typical personality labels, this workshop has people quickly spotting differences and adapting easily. Join the thousands who have attended this powerful and fun workshop. They have learned and use the people skills Quick Spot & Adapt™ techniques to replace workplace personality conflicts with success!







How well are your teams doing? Are they stuck in silent tugs-of-war over personality differences or easily tapping diversity to produce tremendous results?

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
GPS Your Brain to Work w/ Any Personality Type
People Skills Secret Revealed for Introverts & Extroverts
Respect the Differences, Love the Differences, Find the Fit!
Leadership: Risks of Mislabelling Issues as Workplace Personality Conflicts
Teambuilding Across Generations – Proven Approach

©2012-2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Leadership Beliefs: Are Yours Serving You & Your Teams?

Leaders often focus on vision, goals, actions steps, and results. How often do you ask yourself, “What are my leadership beliefs and are they helping me lead?” Here’s a list of ten to get you started on leading and engaging today’s team members with maximum success.


Leadership Beliefs: Image is Teddy Roosevelt's saying Believe & You Are Halfway Thre

Leadership Beliefs: Are Yours Helping You Lead? Image by BK via Flickr.

Image via BK via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Leadership Beliefs: What Are Yours & Are They Helping You Lead?

Find some uninterrupted time to complete this list with your beliefs on:

  1. What is your belief about emotion in the workplace? This affects how you lead and engage diverse employees. It impacts how you assess performance. It influences whom you mentor for leadership positions.

  2. How do you see patience? Do you see it as laziness or inaction? This affects how you lead and engage diverse employees. It impacts how you assess performance. Your leadership belief influence whom you choose to mentor for leadership positions and how you mentor them. Do you agree with Edmund Burke: Our patience will achieve far more than our force. If not, what do you believe?


  3. Leadership Beliefs: This one is on patience.

    Leadership Beliefs – Patience: What do you believe?



  4. Humility – strength or weakness? This is a very important belief when leading a diverse workforce. Cultural differences impact people’s behavior. List out what you see as high performance and low performance behaviors. Are any of the low performance behaviors actually your weak view of humility? Are the high performance behaviors skewed toward over-confidence? Define humility and you will be able to write your leadership beliefs about it.

  5. Empowerment – do you believe in it? How do you define it? Many leaders see it as delegating. Yet delegating tasks isn’t true empowerment. Others see it as throwing people into the deep end and letting them find themselves. Employees might see this as abandonment. To empower is to inform with knowledge, mentor skills, and share power. It includes collaboration. What is your belief about that? Path to success or risky business?

  6. Teamwork – do you truly support it? How do you respond when maverick top performers don’t work with others? Team players will be assessing your leadership beliefs about teamwork at this moment.

  7. Showing employee appreciation – necessity or nicety? Employee surveys continue to rank appreciation and recognition as highly important. They also show that leaders aren’t doing it enough. Are you one of those leaders? Why? What are your leadership beliefs about employee recognition and appreciation?

  8. Employee interaction trouble – do you help them work through it? Or do you label it as immature whining? Do you snap back, work it out for yourselves! Think about your leadership beliefs about your role in employee interaction. Your beliefs drive your actions and the success of the organization.

  9. Collaboration or competition? Do you believe in one more than the other? Do you think they are opposites or coexisting? What do your actions say? Many a team is undone by differing views on this with confusing messages from the leaders.

  10. Inspiration or just the facts? Should a leader inspire employees? Is that part of your role? Some leaders see it as essential to employee engagement others see it as a fluffy waste of time. This is an important leadership issue.

  11. Creativity – do you want it as a culture? Or do you see creativity as frazzled and unproductive. Leadership focus on innovation and creativity is very hot today. Do you truly see the value in it and want it? If yes, do you know how to create it?


Understand your leadership beliefs, check them with your actions, and eliminate the differences. Saying one thing and doing another is a trust buster. Employees need you to clarify your beliefs and follow through with your actions. Here are 18 more things they value and respect in leaders.



What other leadership beliefs should leaders clarify?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Change Leadership Beliefs or You’ll Change Nothing
Leadership & Teamwork: Be Selfless Not Faceless
5 Essentials to Building Successful Modern Day Teams

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



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Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Business Lessons Learned from Life’s Unlimited Extremes


Business Lessons Learned: Image is many red chairs lined up perfectly.

Business Lessons Learned from Everyday Extremes. Image via DesignersPics.com.

Grateful for image via DesignersPics.com.


People Skills: Business Lessons Learned from Everyday Extremes

As The People Skills Coach™, I observe people in everyday life. I see how their extremes affect business behaviors and results. Here is my latest list of business lessons learned from everyday extremes.

  1. Emotions are always there.

    What you do with them makes the difference. Stop trying to suppress all emotion. Capture the power and mitigate the tumble.


  2. If you need the last word on everything, your career won’t last.

    The behavior screams insecurity. It limits teamwork and collaboration. It annoys others and reduces morale. It sends them running from possible domination. Open minds open possibilities for success.


  3. Exaggeration captures the imagination. It is the power of storytelling.

    It inspires employees and influences customers. Yet true distortion of facts can destroy trust. Keep your truth meter running to monitor exaggeration and maintain trust.



  4. Extreme chaos and extreme control can wreck a business.

    Uncontrolled chaos comes across as immaturity and incompetence. Extreme oversight and helicopter management keep people immature and stop growth. Teach, empower, and continue to learn.


  5. People see and find mostly what they are looking for.

    This extreme blinds people to what others think and what else is possible. Success comes from stepping outside of your own perspective and seeing the more complete picture.


  6. Living in your comfort zone creates gulfs not bridges.

    Leaders who communicate from their personality style preferences don’t reach employees of other personality types. Get over being comfortable; get versatile. Be flexible and connect with those you lead.


  7. It’s easy to focus on and get hooked on extremes.

    Choose wisely. Too much focus on procedures and people stop thinking. Too much concern about risk and people stop innovating. Too much candor without enough care and people stop contributing. Inspire passion with balance. Moderation doesn’t mean mediocrity.


Too much of anything is no good.



Business Lessons Learned: What have everyday extremes taught you?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
5 Extreme Behaviors That Harm Teamwork
Leadership Success: Think Balance Beam Not Mountain Top
11 Steps to Being Authentic Without Scaring People Away
Are You Too Nice to Lead?

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Intuitive Leadership: Non-Intuitive Leaders Leading Intuitive Employees

Many non-intuitive leaders feel frustrated with intuitive employees. They see intuition and these employees as emotional and risky. Their image of intuition is the one below with intuition taking the organization up in flames. Meanwhile, they must still lead these employees that they likely did not hire. Here’s how to do it.



Intuitive Leadership: Image is word Intuition in background of colored smoke

Intuitive Leadership: How Non-Intuitive Leaders Can Lead Intuitive Employees Image by: DaniaJ

Image by DaniaJ via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Intuitive Leadership: 5 Ways Non-Intuitive Leaders Can Lead Intuitive Employees

  1. Use your strong logic to separate the emotion from the value of intuition.

    You fear what you can’t see — intuition. This fear brings you to have negative emotion about intuitive employees and brings you to mislabel them as emotional. See the value of their insight. This strengthens your intuitive leadership.

  2. Become a student of their behavior.

    Once you put emotion aside, observe how they think. You will discover that their intuition is not voodoo. It is a synthesis of information and experience reapplied. Make note of when their intuition delivers great results. Ask them how they came to the insight that helped?

  3. Check your intuition doubting beliefs.

    If you are living the belief, “If you can’t measure it, it doesn’t exist”, you will continue to shut out intuition and intuitive employees. Change these limiting beliefs and you strengthen your intuitive leadership. You can lead intuitive employees.

  4. Realize you don’t have to choose.

    You can embrace employees’ intuition and then vet it with other sources of information. See intuition as one component of decision making and complete it with other components. Just don’t get trapped back in a data only mindset.



  5. List out the times you let incomplete data delay your decision.

    When did your delay create problems? Leadership often requires you to lead forward when you don’t have as much data as you would like. Tap your intuitive employees in these moments. They see patterns before you do. They see gaps and answers that you don’t. They notice important elements you overlook. Capture their insights into intuitive leadership to move ahead more quickly.


Non-intuitive leaders — you can lead intuitive employees if you honor their talent instead of fearing it. Demystify their talent using the steps outlined here. It all starts with your desire to understand their intuition and the value of it.


“The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.” ~Albert Einstein

How has other’s intuition helped you?

What did they see and know that you didn’t?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
What is Intuition & How to Develop Yours
Leadership Emotion Radar: 12 Employee Emotional Needs to Honor

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



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Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Employee Insight: 12 Reasons Why Leaders Are Poor Communicators

When companies bring me in to help employees adapt to and implement change, what strikes me is how often the employees don’t understand what’s going on. (Repeated studies show that clear communication is a top factor in effecting change.) Not surprisingly, in these tough moments, employee insight on why leaders communicate poorly comes pouring out.

From discussions with these employees, I have compiled the communication checklist for leaders. This has helped many of my clients and now it can help you. I welcome your additions and comments in the comments section below.



Employee Insight: Image is business people w/ talk bubbles.

Employee Insight: Reasons Why Leaders Communicate Poorly

Grateful for image by Ghozt Tramp via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Employee Insight: 12 Reasons Leaders Communicate Poorly

  1. Leaders assume we understand the big picture they have access to. They don’t communicate the background yet expect us to move forward. Employee insight: Don’t assume we know as much as you do.


  2. Leaders get caught up in their own responsibilities. Thus they unintentionally skew the message to what is weighing them down. Employee insight: Write down your worries but communicate the whole picture. Else we hear only your worries.


  3. Leaders are so focused on the end results that they jump over the details right to the finish line. As they jump, they leave us in the dust. Employee insight: Give us more than the destination else we can’t get there.


  4. Leaders skip issues they don’t have answers to. They do this to prevent confusion or to avoid personal embarrassment and vulnerability. Yet, these gaps often cause more confusion in a changing environment. Employee insight: Identify the gaps and let us know that more information will follow.


  5. Leaders’ expertise blinds them to what others don’t know. This syndrome, expert-itis, undermines clear communication. Employee insight: Invite our questions and have the patience to answer them.


  6. Leaders are often impatient. Be it from personality type or pressure of the job, leaders often communicate as infrequently as possible. Employee insight: Clear and succinct is OK; confusion and silence isn’t.


  7. Leaders repeat the communication style of their leaders. As they try to manage their leader, they sometimes take on their leader’s pattern of minimal communication. Employee insight: The further we are from the top, the more information we need from you.


  8. Leaders don’t account for diversity of background, education, and perspective. Teams are diverse generations, cultures, upbringing, and experience. They aren’t leader clones. Employee insight: Check the stories you use, the jargon you choose, and the references you make. Are they universally understood?


  9. Leaders sometimes under or over prepare to communicate. When they under-prepare they don’t foresee gaps and questions. When they over prepare, they can become rigid and scripted. Employee insight: Prepare what you have to say and then open up to a true dialogue. We can help you clarify what we don’t understand.


  10. Some leaders have a fear of public speaking. To them even speaking in a meeting of ten people is scary. The result is poor communication. Employee insight: Focus on how much your communication will help us. We aren’t judging how you speak. We just need the information.


  11. Leaders who communicate far more of the negatives than the positives, communicate poorly. Communication is about truth and vision. Employee insight: When you communicate what’s wrong, we can fix the current trouble. When you communicate what is going well, we learn how to create success.



  12. Leaders underestimate how much communication sustains others. Even leaders who communicate information clearly, sometimes don’t communicate enough appreciation. Morale and engagement suffer. Employee insight: Don’t take us for granted or detach from us. Leadership is about inspiring us!




Leaders, which of these reasons would your employees say make your communication poor?

What reasons would add to this list?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
When is Silence Golden and When Is It Not?
9 Reasons Leaders Don’t Show Appreciation to Employees
18 Things Respected Well-Liked Leaders Consistently Do

©2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.



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Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Rude angry customers don’t have to demotivate you and wear you down. Rude angry customers can actually be one of the best people skills learning experiences you will ever have.

How? It helps you to develop even more emotional intelligence. This will serve you well throughout your career and your life.   I have been teaching people skills, teamwork, and customer service for 25+ years. The right thoughts and mindset are crucial! It’s emotional intelligence in action.


Think these 5 things when working with rude angry customers for best results. It keeps you both calm and caring — a winning combination.


5 Powerful Beliefs to Win Over Rude Angry Customers

Practice these thoughts as a daily mantra and your outlook toward rude angry customers (and rude people in general) will change. Your people skills will blossom with these emotionally intelligent thoughts!

Rude Angry Customers: Image is flower with thorns.

Rude Angry Customers. Image by Yogendra174 via Flickr.

 


  1. Thorns don’t attack you; they protect them.
    Plants have thorns to protect them. So do people. When you hear a person’s thorns, recognize their fear and weakness. The thorns are not attacking you. They are protecting them. Do not attack them from your fear and you will not get pricked by their thorns.

  2. Easy doesn’t sharpen a thorn. One of the most common questions I receive is “If we are nice to rude angry customers, aren’t we teaching to be rude next time?” No! Your positive responses do not teach them to be thornier! Thorny customers are adults who make their own decisions.

  3. De-thorning them will hurt you! If a stranger tried to kick down your defense mechanisms (like your front door), how would you react? Fight back and defend? Well, the customers don’t have a family relationship or close friendships with you. To them you are a stranger. If you try to clip their thorns directly, they will defend and prick you back.

  4. Empathize w/ Their Emotion; Don’t Analyze Their Thorns! Trying to analyze a customer’s thorns in the few minutes you have to deliver service is not feasible or logical. It takes therapists years to analyze a client’s emotions. Yours is to deliver service, not to change the customer. Empathize emotion don’t analyze it.

  5. Positivity Beats Equality; Don’t be a Thorn! During a recent workshop a technical support rep asked me “Why do rude angry customers acting badly deserved to be treated well?”. I replied, “You treat rude angry customers (and all customers) well because it works. It gets you to the end goal.”

    Treating the customer badly will not get the customer to treat you well. More importantly, it will veer you off course from business success. Positivity beats equality as a winning strategy in customer service.



Be the sun, not the thorn. You can’t change people; you can change your beliefs and influence the outcome!



Tap into more of Kate’s playbook on delivering The Ultimate Customer Experience especially in difficult moments — click here.


From professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Grateful for image by Yogendra174 via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Related Posts:
Customer Service: 24 Tips to Make It Easy For Customers
Super Customer Experience: 5 Immediate No Cost Improvements

©2010-2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on delivering the ultimate customer service, leading change, employee engagement, and teamwork. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.


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Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Employee Appreciation: The Simple Logical Reason to Show It


Employee Appreciation: Picture of Food

Employee Appreciation People Skills: Simplest Reason to Show It. Image via Istock.com.

Image licensed from Istock.

A training company executive called and asked if I would step in and teach one of their courses. One of their instructors had suddenly left and they were in a jam. I taught the course for them and everyone was pleased.


When he asked me to do more subcontracting for them, I thanked him and yet declined. I explained that I had transitioned out of doing subcontracts and had done that one as a colleague to help them out.

He replied: “Kate, don’t bite the hand that feeds you.”

In that short statement, he made me doubly glad I had declined his offer. He had no understanding of collaboration or partnership.


It was clear that he saw himself as powerful. He who had the opportunity was feeding others. It never occurred to him that when I taught as a subcontractor for them, we were feeding each other. It was a two-way work relationship not alms for a starving person.


Implications on Employee Appreciation

I reflected on that as I prepared an employee appreciation workshop for new leaders. Some of them had worked for leaders who didn’t believe in showing appreciation. Since they had no model for employee appreciation, it was important to explore its value.



In order to inspire, engage, and lead effectively, employee appreciation is essential.

Why? Because leaders and employees need each other.


That is the the simplest reason for leaders to show employee appreciation. When leaders treat employees as paid resources rather than valuable, essential relationships, they are guaranteeing turnover. They starve the organization of the very talent needed to succeed.

Companies and leaders are not feeding employees. All employees in an organization feed the success of the whole. It’s the simple logic of employee appreciation.



Question: What employee appreciation story and lesson learned will you share with us here?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related posts:
Leaders, Do You Know Why Your Employees Work?
Leaders, Employee Engagement is Uniquely Personal

©2012-2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.


QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Moderation: Leaders, Do You See It As Mediocrity?


Leaders, when you think of success does the word moderation quickly come to mind? Or do you see moderation as mediocrity and a quick path to the sidelines?

Actually, they are quite different — almost opposites. Mediocrity is the ordinary, unremarkable, and unexceptional.

Moderation is exceptional judgment and restraint. It guides all to success by avoiding the brink of disaster. It is the insight and critically timed shifts that maintain balance as we forge ahead.

Why does it matter? Beliefs drive actions and believing success comes only from extremes can drive our success right off the edge.



Moderation: Image is a Swinging Desk Toy That Balances in the End

Moderation Does Not Mean Mediocrity. Image by:DigitalNative

Grateful for image by: DigitalNative via Creative Commons License.


The Wisdom and Power of Moderation

  1. Great leaders consider diverse views.

    They firmly believe that open-mindedness is not indecisiveness. They ensure that their singular view doesn’t produce extreme tunnel vision or group think. This moderation engages everyone’s commitment and builds ownership to reach organizational success.


  2. Great leaders embrace both optimism and realism.

    This moderation embraces the value of honesty and healthy skepticism while keeping everyone’s can-do attitudes alive and ready for action.


  3. Great leaders know when to tell and when to ask.

    Leadership is not about telling or asking. It’s knowing when to do each. This moderation taps employees’ current talents and share the leaders’ experience for the greatest accomplishment. Leaders who live in the extremes of telling blindside the organization from untapped team knowledge. Those who waffle in constant asking rob the team of growth and scuttle success. Both these extremes breed mediocre results.


  4. Great leaders see both the big picture and the need for the steps to get there.

    Many leaders are big picture thinkers yet they lose patience with the details and challenges. Suddenly, they feel trapped — stuck in the weeds that are stifling progress.

    Yet, great leaders moderate their reaction and respond with insight for they see the difference between needless detail and necessary plans to hit the mark. This moderation honors all the implementation teams and boosts morale and employee engagement.


  5. Moderation does not preclude bold strokes and heroic leaps.

    As moderation clears the view, bold steps have fewer unknown hurdles. Big decisions have a more solid base of support.


  6. Moderation counterbalances risk.

    Gymnasts and dancers know that when forces hurl them in one direction they must counterbalance to avoid a crash. Great leaders do the same. They moderate to secure equilibrium because it accelerates success.




If we think moderation means mediocrity we mistakenly seek excellence only in extremes – and incur unnecessary risk. Moderation doesn’t mean mediocrity and mediocrity doesn’t produce the greatness that moderation can create.


Moderation is the power of balance. It’s the keen perception and good judgment of where and when to move without careening out of control. That is its greatness.




Leaders, what successes have you had from moderating extremes?

What impact has this had on your teams, your career, and the success of your organization?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership, Persistence vs. Resistance to Change
Workplace Disharmony vs. Diversity – The Balance

©2012-2015 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.


QuickSpot-grahpicV2

Engage in people skills learning!

Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience.

I invite your questions, welcome your wisdom, and look forward to working with you.
~Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

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