Hot Topics and New Bits

Prevent the Negative Effects of Being Too Positive!


Is your positive attitude helping yourself and others? It often can. Yet, have you ever met someone who overlooks empathy and drives their positive attitude on others?

When extremely positive people don’t account for others’ needs, their positive outlook can backfire.  They can come across as patronizing, controlling, and oddly enough, insensitive.


Negative Effects of Being Positive image is Smiley Face Cube Glowing

Negative Effects of Being Positive Image by Kristin Resurreccion via Flickr.


Grateful to Kristin Resurreccion for the image via Flickr Creative Commons License.

5 Ways to Prevent the Negative Effects of Being Positive

I have a very positive attitude about life and deliver inspirational keynotes to lift others up. I have also met people who try to convert me to their version of optimism before seeing how positive I already am!  This turns me off to what they have to offer.


To prevent this misstep …

  1. Listen in the moment and understand others’ perspectives.  Listening builds trust through respect of others’ needs.  Sometimes people are so busy encouraging others to be positive they don’t stop and detect what others need at that moment.  Everyone is on a journey and they travel at different speeds.   Some get to a positive attitude faster than others.  Some don’t even want to go there.  

    Exception: If you are a leading an organization through change and a true resistor is slowing the pace with negativity, you will need to address that very clearly to ensure the momentum of change.


  2. Acknowledge and empathize.  Empathy doesn’t mean you agree. It means you matter, we matter this matters. Connect with empathy to build the trust needed to influence others.

  3. Coach only when asked.  In everyday life, don’t elect yourself someone else’s life coach.  Even positive words like “I would like to encourage you to …” are somewhat arrogant if the person didn’t ask for your help.   Live and enjoy your own positive attitude but don’t declare yourself Ruler of PositiveLand and issue decrees.  You may become known as a royal pain in the tail.

  4. Blend optimism with realism. It opens the door to empathy and builds credibility. It is much easier to connect and trust someone who has their feet on the ground as they reach for the stars.

  5. Disagree honestly and with respect. Become comfortable with honest respectful disagreement.  People disagree in life.  Working through disagreements often delivers great results.  Yet sometimes extremely positive people patronize during a disagreement because they seek immediate harmony.  Disagreement can be a positive if it is done respectfully.






Live positively and let others see your optimism and positive choices. Blend it with empathy and realism and you ascend to trust, respect, and the long reach of influence.


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership Optimism: Keeping It Real
When Strong Leaders Use Empathy

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Emotionally Intelligent Teamwork: 10 Ways to Work With Immature Teammates


Is it possible work well with immature teammates when you have developed your emotional intelligence? Yes.

It may not be as enjoyable as working with emotionally intelligent teammates. However, it’s very possible!


Emotionally Intelligent: Image of Marianne Williamson quote.

Emotionally Intelligent Teamwork w/ Emotionally Unintelligent Teammages Graphic via VeryBestQuotes.com

Image via VeryBestQuotes.Com

10 Steps for Emotionally Intelligent Teamwork w/ Less Intelligent Teammates

Most everyone agrees that emotionally intelligent teammates produce better than immature staff who squabble, waffle, and veer off course. It’s also true that teams often have some less emotionally unintelligent team members.

As the goals and deadlines loom, your emotional intelligence can help everyone reach success.



  1. Spot emotionally unintelligent teammates early on. Use your emotional intelligence to spot annoying behavior for what it is. With your positive energy, you will inspire productive teamwork instead of being trapped in annoyance.

  2. Step forward with calm confidence. With your calm confidence, you can accomplish much with immature teammates. They will be drawn to you as a pillar of support.

  3. Influence everyone with your emotionally intelligent humility. Respond to overactive egos with the strength of humility. It flows with quiet power to reach any goal. It smooths resistance. It cuts through immature egos without threatening them. Humility builds trust through its selfless giving. With that influence, you and the team can accomplish anything.

  4. Listen beyond your boundaries. Go beyond your reactions to teammates’ immaturity and listen to draw people magically together. Listening builds understanding. It reduces gaps to accomplish the impossible.

  5. Tune into human needs. Be aware of what immature teammates need to feel secure. Offer empathy, validation, and support. You free them from the emotional needs that trap them and then they contribute to the team. This is not the same thing as fake schmoozing. When your heart cares, your behavior is authentic.

  6. Let your leadership shine. As odd as it sounds, your immature teammates give you many chances to lead. Great leaders don’t drown around people who have less ability. They lead them. Do it happily.

  7. Be realistic. Expect the immaturity and celebrate the growth. Once you spot teammates’ weaknesses, don’t waste your time hoping they will change immediately. Live life as it is not as you think it should be. As they evolve, celebrate their growth.

  8. Be very grateful for your emotional intelligence. It gives you much success and happiness. When you meet immature teammates, be grateful for the maturity you’ve developed. Gratitude keeps your emotional intelligence alive and active. Share your gift!




  9. Set limits intelligently. For example, if a teammate’s immaturity shows you great disrespect, ask for basic human respect: “I would like simple respect. I give it to you and I would like it in return.” Respect is the basis for trust and teamwork. Bring the issue to the table. They may get defensive at first. Eventually, they will see the fairness in it and respond appropriately. By communicating your needs, you give them a chance to evolve.

  10. Buoy yourself. Associate with other emotionally intelligent people. Working with immature teammates can be taxing. Recharge your batteries, inside and outside of work, with others who are as capable as you. Refueling keeps everyone evolving, energized, and working at peak performance.






Let your emotional intelligence shine and elevate the team. Your generosity will come back to you tenfold.



How has your emotional intelligence helped your teammates?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:

5 Steps to Develop Emotional Intelligence
Positive Attitudes for Dealing With Toxic Leaders

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Leadership Calls: Are You Ready to Answer?


Leadership calls. Are you ready to lead others? Do you have the people skills to handle the tough moments?

Do you have the emotional intelligence to spot difficulties early on? Do you have the initiative and courage to step up in order to prevent difficulties from becoming major trouble?


Leadership Calls: Image is paper weight on desk w/ pens sticking out of it.

Leadership Calls: Are You Truly Ready? Image by Arlo_ via Flickr.

Grateful for image by Arlo_ via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Leadership Calls: How Will You Answer?

In the 25 years I’ve been consulting to mid-level leaders, I’ve seen an unfortunate trend. They are managing functions not leading people. Leadership calls, they get promoted, and then feel stumped on how to lead others.

The good news is, you can develop your leadership people skills. Whether new to leadership or not, when leadership calls you can be ready.






Prepare your people skills for these tough situations …

  1. Someone comes to you and says a co-worker is bullying or harassing them. What would you do? There is much evidence to show many leaders minimize the person’s claim, blame the victim, or tell the victim to work it out with the co-worker. BIG mistake. Your response comes across to the victim as abandonment and mistrust. Co-worker bullying thrives on leaders who live in denial. Leadership calls and the leaders don’t lead. They deny and blame.

    Leadership people skills approach: Don’t abandon your employees. Get closer. Talk to them. Ask non-judgmental questions! Explore and listen. In this way, you communicate that you care. You also learn important information and understand the issue. You can then decide on appropriate next steps.

  2. One employee is slacking off. No one is formally complaining to you but they complain to each other. What would you do? If you are thinking, “how would I know if an employee is slacking off,” you are not leading. Leading is pro-active emotional intelligence in action. It senses and sees what’s going on before the virus spreads.

    Leadership people skills approach: Stay connected to the pulse of the workplace. With the teams’ input, set the bar high and then call everyone to reach it with skills, attitude, and great teamwork. If some are slacking off, speak with them. Find out if it’s a skills issue or an attitude issue. If it’s a skills issue, address development or reassignment. If it’s an attitude issue, be clear and frank. Leadership calls and you must call everyone to high levels of performance. If you hide your head on this one, the quicksand will pull you all under.

  3. There’s an organizational change announced and you must lead your teams through it. Upper leadership has announced it. You and your teams aren’t thrilled about it. How do you act? If you commiserate with your teams, you enable their resistance.

    Leadership people skills approach: Embrace the change and lead them to do the same. Empathize and acknowledge their feelings but don’t commiserate and encourage mutiny. Deepen your commitment to the change and get closer to your teams to buoy them. If you don’t believe in the change, why should they?









To get closer and deeper when leadership calls, remember …

  • Being objective and fair doesn’t mean being neutral. Lead them. Don’t abandon them.
  • Leadership requires performance of your duties. Hiding and denying are a form of malpractice. Overlooking symptoms, avoiding necessary conversations, blaming instead of resolving are leadership negligence. Leadership calls. Lead with your eyes wide open.
  • Bonds are not the same thing as bondage. Bonds don’t handcuff and block success. Closer and deeper bonds build trust — the pathway to success. Leadership calls. Be more connected to your people not just the results.



Show your readiness. When leadership calls, get closer and deeper to take everyone farther!



What has been your greatest leadership challenge & how did you handle it?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
The Biggest Leadership Surprises of New Leaders
Leaders, 10 Ways to Ignite Greatness Without Leaving Scars
Exceptional Empowerment: Keep Your Expertise Involved
Leadership: 12 Essential Thoughts to Proficient People Skills

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Superior Customer Service: Think Care Not Guilt


I hear some customer service reps, agents, and analysts — even leaders — say that you shouldn’t say “We’re sorry” to customers because it means “we’re guilty.” There is even one consultant who has written a book with this same idea. The problem is, it is simply not true. It’s a myth and a costly mistake to make.


Sorry doesn’t mean guilty. It means we care. In fact if we are thinking about who’s guilty, we aren’t even in the zone of delivering superior customer service and customer experience.


Don’t picture this …



Superior Customer Service: Image is words Mea Culpa

Superior Customer Service: Sorry Doesn’t Mean Guilty Image via Istock.com





Picture this …



Superior Customer Service: Image is Balloons w/ Sorry Words Celebrating!

Superior Customer Service: Sorry Means We Care!

Grateful for both images from Istockphoto.com.



Superior Customer Service: Think Care, Not Guilt!

Superior customer service is never about guilt. It’s about responsibility, desire, and passion to serve and to care.

  • Sorry doesn’t mean guilty. When we offer condolences at a funeral, it doesn’t mean we are guilty. Sorry is one of the many ways to express empathy. We’re sorry for your _________ doesn’t mean we’re guilty of it.

  • When customers are upset with us, we are responsible (not guilty) for the less than satisfying experience they had. Let’s not back away or defend ourselves. Let’s make it an incredibly great moment that customers will remember. Studies show that outstanding service recovery skills often create some of the most loyal customers! Many customers believe that some mistake is bound to happen and they are wowed by great empathy and service recovery skills.

  • Thinking that sorry means guilty says we are thinking of ourselves instead of the customer. We have misinterpreted the customer’s outburst as an accusation against us. It isn’t. Customers want care and resolution. Give them an unadulterated full out “we’re sorry”. Give them full commitment to resolve the issue and loads of care.

  • Customers can get upset for many reasons. Don’t analyze whether they are valid reasons. Don’t analyze who’s at fault. Don’t act neutral. All of these are wasted time and effort. Go all the way and show them true empathy. Empathize emotions; don’t analyze them.




  • Humility is not humiliation. Humility allows us to put the customers emotional needs ahead of ours. We are the professionals. This is not humiliation — the driving emotion behind the guilty/sorry debate. The debate is useless. It sidetracks us from the main goal of delivering superior customer service, memorable customer experience, and retaining the customers.

  • Live with accountability not blame. We are responsible for delivering superior customer service experience. This is a far cry from being guilty when we miss the mark.



Remember, if customers are complaining to us, they’re still interested in our business. We have a chance to show we care. A chance to wow. Don’t blow this chance by withholding empathy. Give a caring “we’re sorry”. It’s not a shameful “we’re guilty.”


Apologize to customers if they had a less than stellar experience. It is a chance for us to reaffirm commitment with true empathy. It’s a chance to show just how much we care about them. It’s a chance to improve our business and wow the customers even more.


Short 2 minute video with inspirational message for leaders and teams to deliver superior customer experience!


Replace guilt with care. Guilt doesn’t belong in superior customer service. Care does. Create a customer-centric culture that brings them back for more.


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Post:
Leadership: Breed Accountability Not Blame
24 Customer Service Tips That Make Loyalty Easy
Superior Customer Service: 5 Ways to Stay Calm AND Caring w/ Upset Customers

©2013-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Customer Service: 24 Tips to Make it Easy for Customers


Leaders, does your vision of company success include the phrase easy for customers With so much spent on customer loyalty research, it is surprising to see so little focus put on the basic customer service request — make it easy for me!!


There are some exceptions like Staples Office Supplies who have made Easy their brand. Yet it is not a message you hear from every single business. It should be!


When you give customers value and ease, they have little reason to go to your competitors. Easy and valuable builds loyalty builds because it is hard to leave! Are you ready to move past the customer loyalty research and into the zone of true customer loyalty?


Customer service: Image is button that says "easy".

Customer Service: Customers want it easy & valuable. Image by: Spackletoe




Basic Beliefs You’ll Need

  • The customer is your pathway to success — not your enemy. Trust don’t mistrust.
  • There are things all customers need from you to give you their loyalty: value, ease, positive memory, gratitude.
  • The opposite of easy is difficult not high status. Some businesses believe that complexity makes their brand seem more valuable. Yet the finest hotels and restaurants make customer service easy for the customer not complex and difficult.
  • Making customer service easy costs you little and brings you much.






Easy Customer Service: 24 Things Customers Will Love!

  1. Be attentive. “Stop doing other things while you’re helping me.” Stop texting, stop talking to your coworkers about other things, stop picking up the phone and serving other customers, stop watching the video playing in the room, etc… Be present and attentive in customer service.

  2. Be friendly. Friendly makes it easy and it doesn’t have to delay value. “Smile, be open to questions, show me you care.” It costs nothing and speaks volumes in gratitude.

  3. Be adaptable. “I’m a person. Not a cog in your process wheel.” Strict scripts in customer service make life difficult for the customer. This doesn’t mean you must throw out all processes and let each customer run your company. It does mean your processes must be flexible to make customer service easy for each customer.

  4. Be timely. “if you here I’m urgent, get to the point. If I’m laid back, don’t push me.” There are some cultures where fast is rude because it seems like you don’t value the customer as a person. Other cultures value time and want you to respect it.

  5. Be proactive. “Use your expertise to prevent my problems.” Anticipate customers needs. Not that hard to do if you are listening. So throw away the script, listen to what the customers are saying, and make it easy for them. Anticipation communicates care which breeds loyalty. You may even sell them more as you anticipate their needs!

  6. Be creative. “Do something to help me even when I have an unusual request.” Creative problem solving or creative fun (depending on your product/service) makes life easy for the customer. It also energizes employees’ commitment to your brand and the customers!

  7. Be resilient. “Don’t treat me badly because it’s the end of your shift.” The customer needs care even when you are tired. Be as caring to the customer at the end of your workday as you were to the ones at the beginning. This makes it easy to be loyal to your brand.

  8. Be balanced in a storm. “You’re my lifeboat. Stay calm to ease the storm.” Things happen. Handle them with ease and make customer service easy for the customer. This builds trust and loyalty. Don’t tell the customer to calm down. It makes you look like an uncaring inept control freak.

  9. Be transparent. “Remove my doubt.” Pre-purchase or post purchase, being able to trust your brand makes life easy for the customer! Smoke and mirrors, hidden clauses, and surprises that deny service make it difficult for the customer to stay and easy for them to leave!

  10. Be virtuous. “Show me your brand has integrity.” Make your brand a brand of no excuses! Deliver the fix. Don’t defend the trouble. Make it easy for the customer to trust you! Remember, mistrust is a powerful engine.






  11. Honor privacy. A pharmacist in a well-known nationwide pharmacy said out loud to a packed waiting area, “Miss Debra _______________, where on your body will you be using this special powder for your rash? I have to enter the information in the system.” The patient customer was horrified. She gathered her courage and replied, “Why don’t you tell the whole world?” Was this pharmacist an idiot, an uncaring person, or a techno-focused robot? None of those deliver great service. Speak with people privately and secure their private information.

  12. Honor the customer’s view and knowledge. If the customer feels overrun, it’s not great service. Whether it is a retail customer explaining their situation or a patient explaining their pain, their view matters. Honor them with listening and insightful questions that diagnose not demean.

  13. Honor the customers for choosing your company or professional practice. All the traditional courtesies do this well. Please, thank you, you’re welcome, so glad to see you, thanks for coming back to us — all honor the customers for being your customers.






  14. Stop asking the customer to repeat themselves. “Hear me.” Contact centers are notorious for torturing the customer through repetition — especially when connecting the call to others departments. Stop this madness. Listen, take notes, and be the customer’s advocate! Why would anyone be loyal to a brand that tortures them?

  15. Stop hiding! “What’s your phone number?” If a customer can’t easily find your phone number, they are not likely to give you their loyalty. Even in today’s high tech environment of online service, customers want to know that calling you is an option when needed. If you hide your phone number on your website, your message is “don’t call us”. Hmmm… hardly a strategy for customer loyalty.

  16. Stop the jargon! An airline agent asked the customer: “What’s the fare basis on your ticket?” The customer snapped back: “I don’t know. I don’t speak airline.” Jargon makes life difficult for the customer. It also makes a brand seem full of itself.

  17. Work as a team. “I don’t care that it’s not your department!” Silos, personality conflicts, turf wars in companies are the opposite of easy customer service. It makes life difficult for customers and once again tells them you don’t care enough to work as a team.






  18. Welcome the customers’ questions. Questions are a sign of interest. Don’t misconstrue them to be questioning your authority. Build loyalty — don’t expect blind trust. The healthcare community seems to struggle with this. They send the message “ask questions and be active in your healthcare” yet they get impatient when patients ask questions. Remember, customers are easier to deal with when you make it easy for them to build trust in you.

  19. Welcome the customers’ view of customer service. Hotels that have a true customer satisfaction policy build loyalty. Hotels that rigidly define what they think is great customer service lose out. To some customers, safety is absolutely #1. To others, it’s access to the internet. To others, it’s a firm bed. Personalize customer service and you will see customers return.

  20. Welcome the customers’ real feedback. Does your customer feedback survey give customers opportunity to tell you in words what they think and what they would like next time? Having a voice makes it easy for them to come back to you. If you have primarily a numbers based survey, you are telling them you care only about the overall ranking — not what they think.

  21. Satisfy customers before they complain. Customers don’t like to become angry. They want things to be easy and easily addressed. Let them know upfront you will help them. BAM! Easy. Rebuild the trust.

  22. Hire people who like to serve. Yes, they do exist. Then train them, empower them, support them. It’s easy for employees to satisfy customers when leaders aren’t using the reps to limit service to the customers!



  23. Be grateful. Every word you speak, every action you take must tell each customer: “You matter individually.” This makes it easy to come back to you. What human doesn’t want to be valued? Even those that play it kool and claim they don’t care about gratitude, actually love it.

  24. Deliver on the most basic human need — love. Customer loyalty is pretty simple. If you want customers to love your brand, love your customers!


Make it easy for customers! Appreciate them, their time and value to your company. They are not numbers, demographic segments, dutiful servants, idiots waiting for your wisdom, nor puppets for profit.


Respect. them. Care for them. Each — and every one of them!




What tips would you add?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Grateful for image by: Spackletoe via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Related posts:
Irresistible Customer Experience: What Every Customer Wants!
Super Customer Experience: Feelings Aren’t Random
Inside Customer Service Video Series: Kate Nasser
10 Winning Beliefs for Super Customer Experience

©2013-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Millennials Success: 5 Ways to Be Included Not Just Recognized!


Millennials Success: Image is Gold puzzle pieces fitting together.

Millennials Success: Be Included Not Just Recognized Image via Istock.com.

Image licensed from Istock.com


I keep reading articles about what millennials want at work. For millennials success, my advice is …





Being recognized says, “We see you.” Being included says, “We need you and we trust you.” Millennials success, just like anyone’s, depends on being needed and trusted.

Millennials Success: 5 Ways to Be Included Not Just Recognized

Being different can get you recognized yet it won’t necessarily get you included or trusted. Differences create gaps that subconsciously trigger mistrust.

Flex and adapt to others and they will recognize AND include you. As you close the gaps, mistrust fades into comfort and eventually trust.

  1. Dress with some individual expression yet not too much. How you dress tells others whether you want to connect with them. Too different says, “Look how different I am.” Somewhat similar to others says, “Yes I want to connect.” As the saying goes, when in Rome, do as the Romans.

  2. Show your endurance and forbearance. Being needed and trusted grows from your ability to endure and tolerate situations (and people) you don’t like. Everyone faces a difficult road. Show emotional intelligence and willingness to work through others’ flaws.


  3. DifficultRoadsOftenLeadtoBeautifulDestinations


  4. Bring your exuberance and curiosity. Moderate your exuberance with curiosity about others. Too much of “here’s my view” without enough “what’s your view” will get you recognized but not needed, trusted, and included. Show true interest in others and you build empathy based trust.

  5. Offer your talents and technology know-how but don’t expect immediate acceptance. Millennials success comes from offering the new while valuing the status quo. Otherwise others may see you as a narrow-minded naive know-it-all.

  6. Act empowered not entitled. Empowerment gives; entitlement takes. Whom would you trust more? Someone who walks in asking others to do for them or someone who walks in contributing? Contributors become needed and trusted.



To do these things without resentment, remember that inclusion doesn’t mean assimilation. You can be included — needed and trusted — without being completely assimilated and fading into the background.


Inclusion doesn’t mean you lose you. It’s not …



Inclusion is not assimilation. You can still be you!

Inclusion is not assimilation. You can still be you!

Image via Robin Hood from Loxley




Whether starting a career or changing jobs, most people hope to be acknowledged. It’s wonderful to be recognized at work.


Yet being recognized is not enough. Being included signals that you are needed and also trusted for respecting and accommodating others. Eccentrics, celebrities, and upstarts are recognized yet not always trusted and seen as necessary.


For millennials success at work, be included. It’s far better than just being recognized!


Your turn: What else breeds career success?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Career Communication: Too Much Playing Can Be Hazardous
The 8 Ins and Outs of Business People Skills
Courtesy Checklist: 10 Superior Ways to Lead, Serve, & Collaborate
Accountability: People Skills Secrets Revealed

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Reduce Conflict: 5 Places to Hear the Urgency Before the Yell

As The People Skills Coach™, I often teach others how to deal with people’s anger in the workplace and reduce conflict. Does your boss yell? Has a team member suddenly become edgy with you? Has a customer surprised you with a yell?

Reduce Conflict: Image is bee w/ magnifying glass.

Reduce Conflict: Hear the Urgency Before the Yell Image: Istock.

Image licensed from Istock.com


If you don’t like to be yelled at, develop one of the most valuable people skills to reduce conflict:

Hear the urgency before the yell!



Often when the boss, a teammate, or a customer yells, you have missed the urgency they were communicating before the yell. It’s not your fault and this is not about blame. Yet hearing the urgency before the yell can give you what you want — less conflict!

In the face of urgency and a listener who doesn’t hear it, someone may resort to a yell. I am not speaking about people who yell all the time. I am referring to people who suddenly start to yell.

Reduce Conflict: 5 Places to Hear Urgency Before the Yell!

  1. Hear urgency in repetition. When they calmly say the same thing twice, hear their urgency and acknowledge it — before the yell. If you remain silent because you are pondering what they said, the next thing you hear may be a yell. To them silence means you don’t care. Tell them you are thinking not ignoring them.


  2. Hear urgency in their lack of knowledge. Your expertise blinds you to their urgency. As they speak, your knowledge is calmly telling you that you can handle it. Speak up. Nicely reassure them that you can handle it. Communicate solutions sooner to reduce conflict and prevent the yell.

  3. Hear urgency in the painful past or impending future. Many times people’s urgency comes from previous negative experiences that caused them pain or something they are anticipating. Ask great questions while people are calm to uncover their concerns — before the yell. When you uncover the fear, you find the urgency and reduce conflict.

  4. Hear urgency in the need to be acknowledged. Urgency is not always a deadline for action. Often people’s urgency resides in their need to be heard. Tell them that you hear what they are saying. Paraphrase (not parrot) what they have said. Acknowledging people can prevent the yell and reduce conflict.

  5. Hear urgency in the bigger picture. Example: I was teaching a public class. The banquet room was to be setup by 7:30am so I could prepare before greeting the students. I walked in to see a room configured incorrectly and no flip charts.

    I calmly spoke with the hotel rep about re-configuring room and the time frame needed. Ten minutes later there was still no change. I then said, “Fix this now!”. He replied, “that’s good, you woke me up” and quickly fixed the problem. To him, my calm voice at the beginning meant it wasn’t urgent. Had he looked at the bigger picture of my need to prepare before people arrived, he would have heard the urgency in the calm — before the yell.



Bonus Tip: The more you know about people, the easier it is to reduce conflict and prevent the yell. Learn what annoys them (pet peeves), their personality types, their fears and goals, their frustrations, and how best to respond before the yell.





You can create positive, proactive, productive interactions in business.





What have surprising outbursts taught you about reducing conflict in business?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™


Related Posts:
6 Key Reasons Executive Leaders Get Annoyed w/ You
Reduce Conflict: Listen While You Speak

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

A World Gone Social: Interview of Authors Ted Coiné & Mark Babbitt

A World Gone Social: Image is the book cover.

A World Gone Social by Ted Coiné & Mark Babbitt




After years of research, Ted Coiné and Mark Babbitt have penned a substantive leadership book, A World Gone Social.  This book could easily be subtitled, The Accountability Age – Leadership in a World Gone Social. It digs into leadership, employee engagement, customer experience, and innovation. 

The book goes beneath meaningless numbers like total followers to the true influences and influencers in business today.  It reveals social media’s impact on leadership and management and guides leaders on how to make the shift. 

As The People Skills Coach™, I was intrigued and attracted to the book’s title, A World Gone Social.  I wondered what impact it’s truly having on businesses and employees.



I caught up with authors Ted Coiné and Mark Babbitt to learn more about what their research uncovered.

Q: Ted & Mark, as you researched A World Gone Social, what surprises did you uncover?

Mark: Since my business, YouTern, is social all the way, I was surprised that many companies are not living it. Especially at the Csuite level, many haven’t embraced it and aren’t leading from it or with it.

Ted: I was surprised that many companies don’t yet realize that social media is a tool creating a holistic change in how we think, act, and lead. It’s not just a technology trend.  It’s empowering small, little known businesses in garages to truly challenge big businesses.

Kate: Ted, I can almost hear the shark music from Jaws playing in the background as you say that!


Q: Why aren’t leaders, especially at the highest levels, leading from and with social media?

Mark & Ted: They don’t know how to measure it. What’s the ROI of using social media for x amount per day or week?  That is why we included a whole section in the book to meaningful social media metrics and how to calculate them.


Q: How is social media truly changing the work lives of the workers?

Mark & Ted: Well the standard workday is dead. For employees with managers who are emailing them very early and very late, this can lead to overwork, burnout, etc… For employees with managers who believe in flexibility as long as you deliver results, mobile and social media are transforming the workplace in a positive way.


Q: In your opinion, has social media caused more harm than good OR more good than harm?

Ted: I like that question. Best one I’ve been asked yet.  Social media is good. It connects people to a world of new possibilities. And it’s here. You don’t really get a vote. You can choose not to use it yet it affects you anyway.

Mark: It’s all in how you use it. It’s great to celebrate wins and meet that human need for connection in business and in life. However, people who use it to tell the world about their sore feet are missing the true purpose of social media.


Q: Mark & Ted, what are the key messages in your book, A World Gone Social?

  • Death of the large! Small companies are now truly empowered to tell the world about their innovative products and services. This type of communication was formerly only the territory of big players. So for large companies to not  truly embrace social media is a huge strategic mistake.
  • Metrics are still possible! You can measure social media ROI. We show you in this book the approaches to take. 
  • Ordinary is now extraordinary. An ordinary person with an extraordinary network can be hugely successful.  Whether you are a budding entrepreneur or just out of school looking for your first job, branding with social media IS the pathway to success.



Q: What do you intend and hope this book will do for everyone in the business world?

Mark: Help people realize it’s important to re-energize people in the workplace and social media is the pathway to doing it!

Ted: Being social, not just industrial or digital, makes sense because it plays to human nature and basic human needs.

Kate: So it’s not just small talk or useless chatter. It doesn’t distract from business success.  It is the pathway to success.

Mark & Ted: Yes!




Author: Ted Coiné

Chairman, Switch and Shift: Ted Coiné

CEO & Founder YouTern: Mark S. Babbitt

Author: Mark S. Babbitt





Listen to more of the interview about A World Gone Social with Ted Coiné and Mark Babbitt.







Thank you, Mark & Ted, for writing A World Gone Social.  In my opinion it’s a must read for every leader and manager wanting to move past the trend and into the truth about social media’s purpose, influence, and outcomes. Congratulations!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™


Additional Leadership Posts
Leadership: 5 Essentials for Building 21st Century Teams
People Skills: The Secret Within Every Great Communicator


©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Empowered Not Entitled: Communicating for Success

Team members, picture yourselves as leaders or managers. Would you want to lead and manage empowered employees or entitled ones?

The responses overwhelmingly come back, empowered not entitled. Leaders and managers agree too. The question is why?





Empowered Not Entitled: Image is 3 hands.

Communicate You Are Empowered Not Entitled. Image licensed from Istock.com.

Image licensed from Istock.com


Empowered Not Entitled: When Everyone Serves, Everyone Wins!

Empowered team members engage and contribute for maximum success. They step up; they don’t sit back. They give to everyone; they don’t wait to receive. When everyone serves, everyone wins.


Communicate You Are Empowered Not Entitled

  1. Give more than you request.
  2. Correct your mistakes and help others to mend theirs.
  3. Offer sincere apologies when you impact others badly.
  4. Focus on everyone succeeding not getting what others have.
  5. Create your rewards by contributing your talents and effort vs. demanding rewards now.



Bold Illustration
One team member emailed his manager, “I would like to work from home three days a week. How can you make this happen for me?” The language he used communicated he felt entitled. He expected others to do for him. This attitude is a dead weight against success. It burdens and weighs down leaders, managers, and teams.


The manager explained that she wasn’t his concierge. If he wanted to explore new ideas, he should first ask if it’s possible, offer what he would do to make it happen, and outline the benefits to the organization. This is how you communicate you are empowered not entitled!






If a team were comprised of all entitled team members, what would it accomplish? Conversely empowered team members engage and contribute for all to win. Are you a welcome contributor or an annoying maverick?





Empowered not entitled: Show your team & company what you can do for them!



“Never stand begging for that which you have the power to earn.” ~Miguel de Cervantes



Leaders, do your part. Reward contribution not just bold requests for promotion.



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Accountability Legacy: People Skills Secrets Revealed
Teamwork: Are You a Welcome Contributor or an Annoying Maverick?
Teamwork Collaboration: Leadership Beliefs That Kill It

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Why & When Do Executives Get Annoyed & Impatient With You?


If you feel shaky when executives seem annoyed and impatient with you, knowing why they act this way can help you prevent this.

It will reduce your fear by preventing theirs!

Whether you have frequent interactions with these top leaders or the occasional presentation to them, insight about what executives fear can help you modify your approach with them. The results are amazing.


6 Reasons Top Leaders Get Annoyed w/ You. Image is swirling vortex.

6 Reasons Executives Get Impatient & Annoyed w/ You. Image by: Onkel_Wart via Flickr.

Image courtesy of Onkel Wart via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Don’t Trigger Executive Leaders’ Fears

I often teach managers how to make effective presentations to executives. The most important thing to understand is the executive’s mindset.

Most of what executives do depends on others. They do not accomplish tasks purely with their own skill and experience. They must rely on you yet they are accountable for the success of the organization. All of this can induce their fear.

Don’t activate their fear — prevent it!

  1. Executives are pressured to perform broadly. Everyone wants some of their time. To succeed, they funnel info to hit the mark. When you blabber on with details before the main point, you scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Know your purpose and get to the point. Focus prevents organizational failure.


  2. Executives must care about the organization, not just about you. When executives feel that your need for validation and personal expression is more important to you than the business, you scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Capture their attention with the main focus first. Their comprehension goes up and their fear goes down.


  3. Executives are aware of conditions and risks that you don’t know. When they ask for one thing and you give them everything but that, they feel trapped in your lack of knowledge. You scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Give them what they want. If you cannot deliver it, tell them how close you can get with next best option.


  4. Executives need to know the ship can survive a storm. When you tell them the problem without offering a feasible solution, they feel they are steering a ship with no crew. You scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Do your job; don’t ask them to do it!


  5. Executives are there to move the organization forward. When you hesitate, waffle, freeze in a fumble instead of recover, executives see stagnation. You scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Anticipate what questions the executives will ask you and prepare how you will handle it.


  6. Executives are responsible for the overall health of the organization. When you ask for the sun and the moon when the organization is on shaky ground, executives witness mania instead of sanity. You scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Show them up front how your request/solution makes the ground firmer and the organization healthier.



As Bruce Gabrielle notes in his post 9 Tips to Nail Your Next Executive Presentation, “Don’t be afraid of executives, be afraid for them.”


Do not add to their fear. Reduce it with preparation, insight, and focused communication. Show them they can truly rely on you!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Career Success: 13 Important People Skills Tips
Professional People Skills to Show Your Change-Ability

©2011-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Impact of Ego & Pride on Leadership is our people skills chat topic this Sunday.

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday Sept. 7, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



Impact of Ego & Pride on Leadership

Joining me as co-host for this discussion on the impact of ego & pride on leadership will be professional development coach Doris Braun.

Doris is the CEO of Leadership Solutions for Women, a coaching and consulting business advising career-minded women how to advance in their careers, transition to new roles and develop their leadership presence. As a former Wall Street Banker, Doris is passionate about the professional development and advancement of women in business.


Impact of Ego & Pride on Leadership. Image is People skills logo

Impact of Ego & Pride on Leadership. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

What is the Impact of Ego & Pride on Leadership?

Some say a confident ego and loads of pride are essential to high performance and inspiring others to new heights. Others say it is narcissism run amok and the death of great leadership.

JOIN us in this chat as we sort out the finer points to see the impact of ego & pride on leadership.

Some questions to get us thinking in advance:

  • How do you define ego and pride?
  • What is the difference between ego and narcissism?
  • How do you lead? From ego or from something else?
  • What is the difference between self-esteem and pride? Does it matter?
  • How can pride help or hurt a team?
  • How can leaders keep ego & pride in check and still lead?
  • Would you rather work with a prideful leader or a humble leader? Why?
  • What do ego & pride do to people skills and vice versa?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.



So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community on Sunday Sept 7, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your creative views and experience in our people skills chat about the impact of ego & pride on leadership.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to this week’s co-host DorisBraun and the people skills community. Continued thanks to generous chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes for their time and contributions.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday Sept. 7, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on the impact of ego & pride on leadership.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.






TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. Sept. 7, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Twitter Chat about the impact of ego & pride on leadership.

Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Listening Beyond Our Boundaries: Risk Free Success!


Listening Beyond Our Boundaries: Image is person breaking through and emerging through a wall.

Listening Beyond Our Boundaries. Image licensed from Istock.com

Image licensed from Istock.com


We succeed in leadership, teamwork, employee engagement, customer service and relationships in general when we listen beyond our boundaries.

Listening beyond our boundaries solves problems and prevents problems. It turns perceived gaps into understanding. It magically draws people together to do the impossible. There is nothing to stop us.


All we need to do is get started!


Listening Beyond Our Boundaries: 2 Minute Quick Start Video















When has listening beyond your boundaries created surprising results?

How can we help others to listen beyond their boundaries?

Or must everyone do it on their own?


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Post:
Listening Responsibility: Listen While We Speak!

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Listening Responsibility: Listen While We Speak!


Do you get annoyed when people try to interact with you while you are speaking to them? Do you see it as an interruption?

You may be defining listening as complete silence until you are done. If so, you may also be overlooking your listening responsibility.


Listening Responsibility: Image is olive oil pouring through funnel strainer.

Listening Responsibility: Listen for Input While You Speak!

Image courtesy of Williams-Sonoma product catalog.


Unless our purpose is to preach or make a speech, great communication requires that we listen for input while we speak. This is our listening responsibility for true connection.


What kind of input?

  • Non-verbal cues like negative facial expressions, a hand up, heads turning away, people walking away. If we overlook these and keep on talking, our message to others is one of power not care and connection.

  • Polite requests to jump in. Phrases like — excuse me or pardon me or sorry I have to go — signal a need. If we show annoyance at being interrupted, we communicate a desire to dominate and please ourselves rather than connect with others.

  • Input that keeps everyone connected. If people aren’t with us, who are we communicating with? Speaking without allowing input, disengages and disconnects.





Listening Responsibility: 5 Reasons People Interrupt Us

When we speak, people may jump in for various reasons.

  1. They are confused. People who tell me they hate interruptions believe that if people would just let them finish speaking, the confusion would disappear. However, they discount how people feel when they are confused. Waiting prolongs and intensifies the pain of confusion. To communicate and connect, allow people to jump in to clarify and eliminate their confusion.

  2. We are confused. Picture yourself speaking with a customer. They ask a question and we begin to answer it. They jump in when they realize we misunderstood their question. Our listening responsibility is to hear what we misunderstood as soon as possible. Great service comes through dialogue not monologue.

  3. They are seeing disaster that we don’t see. The purpose for speaking can create tunnel vision. As others hear what we are saying, they may jump in to prevent our feet from being stuck in our mouths. Instead of being annoyed at the interruption, consider the helpful input they offer.

  4. We don’t know how they think. Picture presenting to decision makers you don’t know. You start your presentation and they quickly jump in and ask questions. Listen to this input. They are telling you how they think and how they decide. Turn their gift into your success! Don’t resist their input as an interruption. Project your desire to serve not your need for power.

  5. Something has changed. Things can change from the moment we start to speak to the moment people jump in. Perhaps they need to leave suddenly. Maybe we’ve said something that completely changes the topic and view. While we speak, our listening responsibility is to be aware of what is changing and adapt to close the gap.






Speaking is not output. It is output in response to input that is flowing at you. Embrace this input. Connect with others by listening while you speak. Reach ‘em, don’t preach ‘em!


Your turn: When have you embraced input instead of being annoyed at it?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership: Are You Communicating w/ Honesty & Civility?
People Skills: The Secret Within Every Great Communicator
Career Success: Are You Rocking w/ These 13 People Skills?

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Leadership: Do You See a Generation Gap or an Intersection?


Every day  I hear leaders talk about the generation gap in the workplace.  I read about it blogs.  My reaction is, it’s an intersection — not a gap!


When the leadership in an organization see and focus on the differences, they widen the gap.  When the leadership see the possibilities at the intersection of talents, the gap narrows and even disappears.



Leadership: Find the Generation Intersections!

Gaps among diverse people are temporary not permanent. Consider how many times gaps have faded into sudden connection and teamwork in everyday life …

  • Disparate groups — even mistrustful factions — who pull together in a major crisis to save lives
  • Prospects who don’t want to talk to a sales person — until the sales rep finds the common ground
  • Private venture capitalists who embrace very young entrepreneurs when high potential and profit is staring them in the face
  • Very young entrepreneurs who truly welcome older experienced investors and advisers to increase success



Everyone Has a Story
We’ve all seen grandparents captivate their grandchildren with stories of the past. My young niece, when hearing me tell funny stories about relatives she never knew, blurted out “tell more stories!” This was after a long holiday meal where she was the only child at the table. You would think she would have been bored. No! She wanted to connect/intersect with generations she never knew.

What common elements turn the generation gap into an intersection?

  1. Positive, fun, upbeat, hopeful moments
  2. Possibilities and abundance for everyone not exclusions and shortage of opportunities
  3. Mutual gain from respecting diverse talents and views
  4. Higher calling or need as in a crisis

Leadership Generations Intersection: Image is intersecting circles.

Leadership Generations Intersection Not Gap via Istock.com.




What can leadership do to create these intersections?

  1. Create positive opportunities for the generations to intersect.
  2. Highlight the abundance of success that awaits instead of the tough times and narrowing opportunities.
  3. Team build with employees’ stories. The generations intersect as they see common human needs and responses emerge and merge.






Images licensed from Istock.com

Why bother? Because …






Leaders, help the generations to intersect. The time is now. I have many team building programs to make this happen. Let’s do it!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Teamwork Posts:
Leadership: 5 Essentials to Build 21st Century Teams
Leadership People Skills: 5 Ways to Spark Team Agility

©2013-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Exceptional Empowerment: Do Employees Think They Can’t Ask You?

Empower your employees! This has become the leadership mantra of the decade. It develops new talent. It prevents the horror of micro-managing BUT …


Do empowered employees believe they must go it alone?


Leaders, if you want the results of exceptional empowerment, make it clear that it’s OK to tap expertise.






Exceptional Empowerment: Image is flying statues.

Exceptional Empowerment: Includes Mentoring & Collaboration Image by Martin Pettitt via Flickr.

Grateful for image by Martin Pettitt via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Exceptional Empowerment: Include Input & Collaboration

When leaders first try empowering employees, they often go astray. They mistakenly communicate to employees to go it alone.


“Don’t ask me. You’re empowered!”


That statement undermines empowerment. Avoid this risk. Finish the statement.


“Don’t ask me for permission. You’re empowered.”

 

Those two extra words, for permission, make a big difference. Empowered employees don’t ask for permission. They ask for input, knowledge, and perspective.




Leadership Steps to Exceptional Empowerment

  • Mentor. Empower with knowledge and experience. Don’t go from micro-managing to abandonment. Share your knowledge. Mentor through questions instead of leading with commands.

  • Distinguish exploring from struggling. Throwing someone into the deep end unprepared creates struggle. Sharing knowledge empowers exploration. The former can leave unproductive scars. The latter fuels greatness. Training wheels on a bicycle don’t stop the learning. Riders still have to peddle and steer around obstacles.

  • Define empowerment as development and sharing power — not delegation. Development suggests learning and growth. It shares power through knowledge and collaboration.

    Delegation doesn’t empower. It assigns responsibility. The delegators still have the power. Those delegated to represent those doing the delegating. This is not empowerment.





Make a smart start to exceptional empowerment. Don’t go from a hierarchical, solo work culture, directly to empowerment. Shift to a collaborative culture first. It makes sharing knowledge the norm. Exceptional empowerment in the organization develops easily from there.


Your turn: Do you empower people to collaborate or to go it alone?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Teamwork Collaboration: Leadership Beliefs That Kill It
The True Cost of Fake Empowerment

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Older Posts »