Leadership

Emotionally Intelligent Teamwork: 10 Ways to Work With Immature Teammates


Is it possible work well with immature teammates when you have developed your emotional intelligence? Yes.

It may not be as enjoyable as working with emotionally intelligent teammates. However, it’s very possible!


Emotionally Intelligent: Image of Marianne Williamson quote.

Emotionally Intelligent Teamwork w/ Emotionally Unintelligent Teammages Graphic via VeryBestQuotes.com

Image via VeryBestQuotes.Com

10 Steps for Emotionally Intelligent Teamwork w/ Less Intelligent Teammates

Most everyone agrees that emotionally intelligent teammates produce better than immature staff who squabble, waffle, and veer off course. It’s also true that teams often have some less emotionally unintelligent team members.

As the goals and deadlines loom, your emotional intelligence can help everyone reach success.



  1. Spot emotionally unintelligent teammates early on. Use your emotional intelligence to spot annoying behavior for what it is. With your positive energy, you will inspire productive teamwork instead of being trapped in annoyance.

  2. Step forward with calm confidence. With your calm confidence, you can accomplish much with immature teammates. They will be drawn to you as a pillar of support.

  3. Influence everyone with your emotionally intelligent humility. Respond to overactive egos with the strength of humility. It flows with quiet power to reach any goal. It smooths resistance. It cuts through immature egos without threatening them. Humility builds trust through its selfless giving. With that influence, you and the team can accomplish anything.

  4. Listen beyond your boundaries. Go beyond your reactions to teammates’ immaturity and listen to draw people magically together. Listening builds understanding. It reduces gaps to accomplish the impossible.

  5. Tune into human needs. Be aware of what immature teammates need to feel secure. Offer empathy, validation, and support. You free them from the emotional needs that trap them and then they contribute to the team. This is not the same thing as fake schmoozing. When your heart cares, your behavior is authentic.

  6. Let your leadership shine. As odd as it sounds, your immature teammates give you many chances to lead. Great leaders don’t drown around people who have less ability. They lead them. Do it happily.

  7. Be realistic. Expect the immaturity and celebrate the growth. Once you spot teammates’ weaknesses, don’t waste your time hoping they will change immediately. Live life as it is not as you think it should be. As they evolve, celebrate their growth.

  8. Be very grateful for your emotional intelligence. It gives you much success and happiness. When you meet immature teammates, be grateful for the maturity you’ve developed. Gratitude keeps your emotional intelligence alive and active. Share your gift!


  9. Set limits intelligently. For example, if a teammate’s immaturity shows you great disrespect, ask for basic human respect: “I would like simple respect. I give it to you and I would like it in return.” Respect is the basis for trust and teamwork. Bring the issue to the table. They may get defensive at first. Eventually, they will see the fairness in it and respond appropriately. By communicating your needs, you give them a chance to evolve.

  10. Buoy yourself. Associate with other emotionally intelligent people. Working with immature teammates can be taxing. Recharge your batteries, inside and outside of work, with others who are as capable as you. Refueling keeps everyone evolving, energized, and working at peak performance.






Let your emotional intelligence shine and elevate the team. Your generosity will come back to you tenfold.



How has your emotional intelligence helped your teammates?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:

5 Steps to Develop Emotional Intelligence
Positive Attitudes for Dealing With Toxic Leaders

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Leadership Calls: Are You Ready to Answer?


Leadership calls. Are you ready to lead others? Do you have the people skills to handle the tough moments?

Do you have the emotional intelligence to spot difficulties early on? Do you have the initiative and courage to step up in order to prevent difficulties from becoming major trouble?


Leadership Calls: Image is paper weight on desk w/ pens sticking out of it.

Leadership Calls: Are You Truly Ready? Image by Arlo_ via Flickr.

Grateful for image by Arlo_ via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Leadership Calls: How Will You Answer?

In the 25 years I’ve been consulting to mid-level leaders, I’ve seen an unfortunate trend. They are managing functions not leading people. Leadership calls, they get promoted, and then feel stumped on how to lead others.

The good news is, you can develop your leadership people skills. Whether new to leadership or not, when leadership calls you can be ready.






Prepare your people skills for these tough situations …

  1. Someone comes to you and says a co-worker is bullying or harassing them. What would you do? There is much evidence to show many leaders minimize the person’s claim, blame the victim, or tell the victim to work it out with the co-worker. BIG mistake. Your response comes across to the victim as abandonment and mistrust. Co-worker bullying thrives on leaders who live in denial. Leadership calls and the leaders don’t lead. They deny and blame.

    Leadership people skills approach: Don’t abandon your employees. Get closer. Talk to them. Ask non-judgmental questions! Explore and listen. In this way, you communicate that you care. You also learn important information and understand the issue. You can then decide on appropriate next steps.

  2. One employee is slacking off. No one is formally complaining to you but they complain to each other. What would you do? If you are thinking, “how would I know if an employee is slacking off,” you are not leading. Leading is pro-active emotional intelligence in action. It senses and sees what’s going on before the virus spreads.

    Leadership people skills approach: Stay connected to the pulse of the workplace. With the teams’ input, set the bar high and then call everyone to reach it with skills, attitude, and great teamwork. If some are slacking off, speak with them. Find out if it’s a skills issue or an attitude issue. If it’s a skills issue, address development or reassignment. If it’s an attitude issue, be clear and frank. Leadership calls and you must call everyone to high levels of performance. If you hide your head on this one, the quicksand will pull you all under.

  3. There’s an organizational change announced and you must lead your teams through it. Upper leadership has announced it. You and your teams aren’t thrilled about it. How do you act? If you commiserate with your teams, you enable their resistance.

    Leadership people skills approach: Embrace the change and lead them to do the same. Empathize and acknowledge their feelings but don’t commiserate and encourage mutiny. Deepen your commitment to the change and get closer to your teams to buoy them. If you don’t believe in the change, why should they?







To get closer and deeper when leadership calls, remember …

  • Being objective and fair doesn’t mean being neutral. Lead them. Don’t abandon them.
  • Leadership requires performance of your duties. Hiding and denying are a form of malpractice. Overlooking symptoms, avoiding necessary conversations, blaming instead of resolving are leadership negligence. Leadership calls. Lead with your eyes wide open.
  • Bonds are not the same thing as bondage. Bonds don’t handcuff and block success. Closer and deeper bonds build trust — the pathway to success. Leadership calls. Be more connected to your people not just the results.



Show your readiness. When leadership calls, get closer and deeper to take everyone farther!



What has been your greatest leadership challenge & how did you handle it?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
The Biggest Leadership Surprises of New Leaders
Leaders, 10 Ways to Ignite Greatness Without Leaving Scars
Exceptional Empowerment: Keep Your Expertise Involved
Leadership: 12 Essential Thoughts to Proficient People Skills

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Positive Attitudes: How to Survive Toxic Leaders

Your initial reaction to this title might be that if they’re toxic, they are not leaders.

Most people would probably agree with you. BUT you still have to deal with these toxic leaders unless or until you choose to leave.


Positive Attitudes: Image is the word Toxic w/ dollar signs around it.

Positive Attitudes: Dealing w/ Toxic Leaders Image by Don Shall via Flickr.

Image by Don Shall via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Positive Attitudes: Mind Over (What Doesn’t) Matter

Positive attitudes give you the power to cope and even transform very difficult moments. The question is: Can you get your mind to overcome what doesn’t matter?


First and foremost, know what matters to you. For me, it’s my health. I can’t live without it. I’ve learned what conditions zap my health. In those toxic moments — if I can’t change them — I move on.


In other toxic moments I use positive attitudes to survive and even thrive!

  1. Realize it’s a feeling not a fact. You can feel conquered by toxic leaders when you believe that what you are feeling is an unchangeable fact. You can change your outlook and your feelings. You have choices. You’re not trapped!

    “If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” ~Wayne Dyer


  2. Know and focus on your long term goals. This is a pleasant detour from the rough road of toxic leaders. It gets you to your destination without getting lost in their toxic behavior. Your positive attitudes set the path of that detour; don’t take theirs!

  3. Find sanctuary in your own energy. Success takes energy. Channel it into your happy journey not a toxic dump. Positive attitudes lift you up!

  4. Be an amused spectator. See the dysfunction of toxic leaders as a reality TV show. Enjoy the humor in the absurd behavior from the safe distance of mental objectivity. Take great pleasure in seeing through, behind, and beyond the toxic behavior.

  5. Escape to positive attitudes. During work, mentally escape to positive attitudes that spur you on. I often think of how much I am learning. It gives me great comfort. After work, engage in activities that you love. Your happiness is your choice.

  6. Compare what worse you have already faced. As galling as toxic leader behavior is, it pales in comparison to serious, even life threatening events. I will always remember a client telling me that toxic leaders don’t bother him.

    Before that, he was in the U.S. Coast Guard on a patrol boat looking for drug runners. He told me, “This is way better than getting my ass shot off in the Gulf of Mexico. I’m happy to have a job, contribute, and yes, even deal with my crazy boss.” Ask yourself, what is your current job better than?



What positive attitudes keep you going? Share them with us!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related People Skills Posts:
Reduce Conflict: Hear the Urgency Before the Yell
Career Success: Rock With These 13 Key People Skills
6 Key Reasons Leaders Get Annoyed With You

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Empowerment vs Entitlement is our people skills chat topic this Sunday.

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday Sept. 21, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
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Empowerment vs Entitlement

Empowerment and entitlement are can sometimes get in each other’s way. Perhaps because there is confusion over the difference or different philosophies on which is better? To sort it out, we will explore empowerment vs entitlement in Sunday’s people skills Twitter chat.


Empowerment vs Entitlement.  Image is People skills logo

Empowerment vs Entitlement. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

A Deeper Look at Empowerment vs Entitlement

JOIN us Sunday at 10am ET in #peopleskills Twitter chat to share your views and experience on entitlement vs empowerment.

Some questions to get us thinking in advance:

  • What is the difference between empowerment and entitlement?
  • Do you consider yourself to be empowered, entitled, or _______________?
  • How does feeling entitled help or hurt your life?
  • What if anything are workers entitled to?
  • What are the words of entitlement? What are the words of empowerment?
  • Where does empowerment take you that entitlement can’t and vice versa?
  • How do empowerment and delegation differ?
  • How does empowerment affect businesses and employees?
  • The 3 most important factors for successful empowerment are _______________.
  • What leadership beliefs help or hinder empowerment?
  • What people skills do leaders, managers, and teams need to succeed in empowerment?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.



So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community on Sunday Sept 21, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your creative views and experience in our people skills chat about empowerment vs entitlement.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Continued thanks to generous chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes for their time and contributions.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday Sept. 21, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on empowerment vs entitlement.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.






TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. Sept. 21, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Twitter Chat about empowerment vs entitlement.

Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

A World Gone Social: Interview of Authors Ted Coiné & Mark Babbitt

A World Gone Social: Image is the book cover.

A World Gone Social by Ted Coiné & Mark Babbitt




After years of research, Ted Coiné and Mark Babbitt have penned a substantive leadership book, A World Gone Social.  This book could easily be subtitled, The Accountability Age – Leadership in a World Gone Social. It digs into leadership, employee engagement, customer experience, and innovation. 

The book goes beneath meaningless numbers like total followers to the true influences and influencers in business today.  It reveals social media’s impact on leadership and management and guides leaders on how to make the shift. 

As The People Skills Coach™, I was intrigued and attracted to the book’s title, A World Gone Social.  I wondered what impact it’s truly having on businesses and employees.



I caught up with authors Ted Coiné and Mark Babbitt to learn more about what their research uncovered.

Q: Ted & Mark, as you researched A World Gone Social, what surprises did you uncover?

Mark: Since my business, YouTern, is social all the way, I was surprised that many companies are not living it. Especially at the Csuite level, many haven’t embraced it and aren’t leading from it or with it.

Ted: I was surprised that many companies don’t yet realize that social media is a tool creating a holistic change in how we think, act, and lead. It’s not just a technology trend.  It’s empowering small, little known businesses in garages to truly challenge big businesses.

Kate: Ted, I can almost hear the shark music from Jaws playing in the background as you say that!


Q: Why aren’t leaders, especially at the highest levels, leading from and with social media?

Mark & Ted: They don’t know how to measure it. What’s the ROI of using social media for x amount per day or week?  That is why we included a whole section in the book to meaningful social media metrics and how to calculate them.


Q: How is social media truly changing the work lives of the workers?

Mark & Ted: Well the standard workday is dead. For employees with managers who are emailing them very early and very late, this can lead to overwork, burnout, etc… For employees with managers who believe in flexibility as long as you deliver results, mobile and social media are transforming the workplace in a positive way.


Q: In your opinion, has social media caused more harm than good OR more good than harm?

Ted: I like that question. Best one I’ve been asked yet.  Social media is good. It connects people to a world of new possibilities. And it’s here. You don’t really get a vote. You can choose not to use it yet it affects you anyway.

Mark: It’s all in how you use it. It’s great to celebrate wins and meet that human need for connection in business and in life. However, people who use it to tell the world about their sore feet are missing the true purpose of social media.


Q: Mark & Ted, what are the key messages in your book, A World Gone Social?

  • Death of the large! Small companies are now truly empowered to tell the world about their innovative products and services. This type of communication was formerly only the territory of big players. So for large companies to not  truly embrace social media is a huge strategic mistake.
  • Metrics are still possible! You can measure social media ROI. We show you in this book the approaches to take. 
  • Ordinary is now extraordinary. An ordinary person with an extraordinary network can be hugely successful.  Whether you are a budding entrepreneur or just out of school looking for your first job, branding with social media IS the pathway to success.



Q: What do you intend and hope this book will do for everyone in the business world?

Mark: Help people realize it’s important to re-energize people in the workplace and social media is the pathway to doing it!

Ted: Being social, not just industrial or digital, makes sense because it plays to human nature and basic human needs.

Kate: So it’s not just small talk or useless chatter. It doesn’t distract from business success.  It is the pathway to success.

Mark & Ted: Yes!




Author: Ted Coiné

Chairman, Switch and Shift: Ted Coiné

CEO & Founder YouTern: Mark S. Babbitt

Author: Mark S. Babbitt





Listen to more of the interview about A World Gone Social with Ted Coiné and Mark Babbitt.







Thank you, Mark & Ted, for writing A World Gone Social.  In my opinion it’s a must read for every leader and manager wanting to move past the trend and into the truth about social media’s purpose, influence, and outcomes. Congratulations!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™


Additional Leadership Posts
Leadership: 5 Essentials for Building 21st Century Teams
People Skills: The Secret Within Every Great Communicator


©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Why & When Do Executives Get Annoyed & Impatient With You?


If you feel shaky when executives seem annoyed and impatient with you, knowing why they act this way can help you prevent this.

It will reduce your fear by preventing theirs!

Whether you have frequent interactions with these top leaders or the occasional presentation to them, insight about what executives fear can help you modify your approach with them. The results are amazing.


6 Reasons Top Leaders Get Annoyed w/ You. Image is swirling vortex.

6 Reasons Executives Get Impatient & Annoyed w/ You. Image by: Onkel_Wart via Flickr.

Image courtesy of Onkel Wart via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Don’t Trigger Executive Leaders’ Fears

I often teach managers how to make effective presentations to executives. The most important thing to understand is the executive’s mindset.

Most of what executives do depends on others. They do not accomplish tasks purely with their own skill and experience. They must rely on you yet they are accountable for the success of the organization. All of this can induce their fear.

Don’t activate their fear — prevent it!

  1. Executives are pressured to perform broadly. Everyone wants some of their time. To succeed, they funnel info to hit the mark. When you blabber on with details before the main point, you scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Know your purpose and get to the point. Focus prevents organizational failure.


  2. Executives must care about the organization, not just about you. When executives feel that your need for validation and personal expression is more important to you than the business, you scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Capture their attention with the main focus first. Their comprehension goes up and their fear goes down.


  3. Executives are aware of conditions and risks that you don’t know. When they ask for one thing and you give them everything but that, they feel trapped in your lack of knowledge. You scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Give them what they want. If you cannot deliver it, tell them how close you can get with next best option.


  4. Executives need to know the ship can survive a storm. When you tell them the problem without offering a feasible solution, they feel they are steering a ship with no crew. You scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Do your job; don’t ask them to do it!


  5. Executives are there to move the organization forward. When you hesitate, waffle, freeze in a fumble instead of recover, executives see stagnation. You scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Anticipate what questions the executives will ask you and prepare how you will handle it.


  6. Executives are responsible for the overall health of the organization. When you ask for the sun and the moon when the organization is on shaky ground, executives witness mania instead of sanity. You scare the bejeebers out of them.

    Tip: Show them up front how your request/solution makes the ground firmer and the organization healthier.



As Bruce Gabrielle notes in his post 9 Tips to Nail Your Next Executive Presentation, “Don’t be afraid of executives, be afraid for them.”


Do not add to their fear. Reduce it with preparation, insight, and focused communication. Show them they can truly rely on you!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Career Success: 13 Important People Skills Tips
Professional People Skills to Show Your Change-Ability

©2011-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Impact of Ego & Pride on Leadership is our people skills chat topic this Sunday.

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday Sept. 7, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
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Impact of Ego & Pride on Leadership

Joining me as co-host for this discussion on the impact of ego & pride on leadership will be professional development coach Doris Braun.

Doris is the CEO of Leadership Solutions for Women, a coaching and consulting business advising career-minded women how to advance in their careers, transition to new roles and develop their leadership presence. As a former Wall Street Banker, Doris is passionate about the professional development and advancement of women in business.


Impact of Ego & Pride on Leadership. Image is People skills logo

Impact of Ego & Pride on Leadership. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

What is the Impact of Ego & Pride on Leadership?

Some say a confident ego and loads of pride are essential to high performance and inspiring others to new heights. Others say it is narcissism run amok and the death of great leadership.

JOIN us in this chat as we sort out the finer points to see the impact of ego & pride on leadership.

Some questions to get us thinking in advance:

  • How do you define ego and pride?
  • What is the difference between ego and narcissism?
  • How do you lead? From ego or from something else?
  • What is the difference between self-esteem and pride? Does it matter?
  • How can pride help or hurt a team?
  • How can leaders keep ego & pride in check and still lead?
  • Would you rather work with a prideful leader or a humble leader? Why?
  • What do ego & pride do to people skills and vice versa?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.



So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community on Sunday Sept 7, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your creative views and experience in our people skills chat about the impact of ego & pride on leadership.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to this week’s co-host DorisBraun and the people skills community. Continued thanks to generous chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes for their time and contributions.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday Sept. 7, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on the impact of ego & pride on leadership.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.






TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. Sept. 7, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Twitter Chat about the impact of ego & pride on leadership.

Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Leadership: Do You See a Generation Gap or an Intersection?


Every day  I hear leaders talk about the generation gap in the workplace.  I read about it blogs.  My reaction is, it’s an intersection — not a gap!


When the leadership in an organization see and focus on the differences, they widen the gap.  When the leadership see the possibilities at the intersection of talents, the gap narrows and even disappears.



Leadership: Find the Generation Intersections!

Gaps among diverse people are temporary not permanent. Consider how many times gaps have faded into sudden connection and teamwork in everyday life …

  • Disparate groups — even mistrustful factions — who pull together in a major crisis to save lives
  • Prospects who don’t want to talk to a sales person — until the sales rep finds the common ground
  • Private venture capitalists who embrace very young entrepreneurs when high potential and profit is staring them in the face
  • Very young entrepreneurs who truly welcome older experienced investors and advisers to increase success



Everyone Has a Story
We’ve all seen grandparents captivate their grandchildren with stories of the past. My young niece, when hearing me tell funny stories about relatives she never knew, blurted out “tell more stories!” This was after a long holiday meal where she was the only child at the table. You would think she would have been bored. No! She wanted to connect/intersect with generations she never knew.

What common elements turn the generation gap into an intersection?

  1. Positive, fun, upbeat, hopeful moments
  2. Possibilities and abundance for everyone not exclusions and shortage of opportunities
  3. Mutual gain from respecting diverse talents and views
  4. Higher calling or need as in a crisis

Leadership Generations Intersection: Image is intersecting circles.

Leadership Generations Intersection Not Gap via Istock.com.




What can leadership do to create these intersections?

  1. Create positive opportunities for the generations to intersect.
  2. Highlight the abundance of success that awaits instead of the tough times and narrowing opportunities.
  3. Team build with employees’ stories. The generations intersect as they see common human needs and responses emerge and merge.




Images licensed from Istock.com

Why bother? Because …




Leaders, help the generations to intersect. The time is now. I have many team building programs to make this happen. Let’s do it!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Teamwork Posts:
Leadership: 5 Essentials to Build 21st Century Teams
Leadership People Skills: 5 Ways to Spark Team Agility

©2013-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

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Exceptional Empowerment: Do Employees Think They Can’t Ask You?

Empower your employees! This has become the leadership mantra of the decade. It develops new talent. It prevents the horror of micro-managing BUT …


Do empowered employees believe they must go it alone?


Leaders, if you want the results of exceptional empowerment, make it clear that it’s OK to tap expertise.






Exceptional Empowerment: Image is flying statues.

Exceptional Empowerment: Includes Mentoring & Collaboration Image by Martin Pettitt via Flickr.

Grateful for image by Martin Pettitt via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Exceptional Empowerment: Include Input & Collaboration

When leaders first try empowering employees, they often go astray. They mistakenly communicate to employees to go it alone.


“Don’t ask me. You’re empowered!”


That statement undermines empowerment. Avoid this risk. Finish the statement.


“Don’t ask me for permission. You’re empowered.”

 

Those two extra words, for permission, make a big difference. Empowered employees don’t ask for permission. They ask for input, knowledge, and perspective.


Leadership Steps to Exceptional Empowerment

  • Mentor. Empower with knowledge and experience. Don’t go from micro-managing to abandonment. Share your knowledge. Mentor through questions instead of leading with commands.

  • Distinguish exploring from struggling. Throwing someone into the deep end unprepared creates struggle. Sharing knowledge empowers exploration. The former can leave unproductive scars. The latter fuels greatness. Training wheels on a bicycle don’t stop the learning. Riders still have to peddle and steer around obstacles.

  • Define empowerment as development and sharing power — not delegation. Development suggests learning and growth. It shares power through knowledge and collaboration.

    Delegation doesn’t empower. It assigns responsibility. The delegators still have the power. Those delegated to represent those doing the delegating. This is not empowerment.





Make a smart start to exceptional empowerment. Don’t go from a hierarchical, solo work culture, directly to empowerment. Shift to a collaborative culture first. It makes sharing knowledge the norm. Exceptional empowerment in the organization develops easily from there.


Your turn: Do you empower people to collaborate or to go it alone?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Teamwork Collaboration: Leadership Beliefs That Kill It
The True Cost of Fake Empowerment

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Volumes are written on key steps to leading change. When we sort through it all, one blatant truth emerges:

Leading change requires networking our inspiration!

Leading Change: Image is fish jumping from one glass to the next.

Leading Change: Network Our Inspiration

Image licensed via Istock.com.


From this we might focus on communicating the change, the reasons why, what’s in it for everyone, what it will take etc….


Are you inspired by that? Probably not. No one else will be either. Admittedly communication is critical to leading change. Yet communicating about the change is NOT the same as inspiring others to make it happen.


Networking our inspiration with those we lead includes:

  • Starting with mutual respect
  • Developing trust through the heart not just the head
  • Engaging their talents and their spirit
  • Building their change-ability to prepare for major shifts



Networking inspiration must start early — the day we become positional leaders. Not the day we need to lead change.

    Highly directive leaders who rarely engage their teams will seem fake when suddenly networking inspiration to spur a major change. It seems manipulative. People resist being changed.
    Leaders who focus mostly on being liked also struggle with leading change. They have built personal connections based on neediness and their fear is palpable. There is little for others to trust in order to overcome the comfort of the status quo.



We can effectively lead change when we have healthy connections to team members and the mission of the organization. This healthy balance of head and heart is the inspiration!



Earning Trust With Our Heads and Hearts

Long before major changes inch onto the horizon, team members are looking to see how we as leaders handle difficult situations. Some situations may be very mission related while still others will relate to team dynamics and morale.

Examples

  • Showing them our clear heads in a crisis is a start. Developing their clear heads for change through coaching and empowerment is networking our inspiration!
  • Reviewing data with them before a decision develops valuable critical thinking. Using our intuition and tapping theirs builds their change-ability!

    Change involves dealing with the unknown. Using intuition gives everyone practice in grappling with grey areas and moving ahead with less than a full picture. With this practice, we network our inspiration and develop their change-ability long before a major change is needed.

  • When we handle individual performance issues, we act appropriately. When we also address team morale issues resulting from performance issues, we celebrate the value of morale in leading change. “Work it our yourselves” is abdicating our inspirational role. “Let’s work this out and create a model for maintaining great morale”, is networking our inspiration.


We lead change with inspiration; we succeed when we network the inspiration and build change-ability throughout the organization.


Why do many leaders avoid the inspirational approach when it is so critical to leading change?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2012-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.

Related Posts:
Leading Change: Is the Beloved Bully Stopping You?
Leaders, Engage Employees Change-Ability Through Entrepreneurial Spirit
Leaders, Develop Your Intuition


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Teamwork Collaboration: Leaders, Is Your Competitive Spirit Killing It?


Teamwork Collaboration Killers: Image is large foot stepping on a person.

Teamwork Collaboration: Leadership Beliefs That Kill It! Image via Istock.com.

Image licensed via Istock.com


Business owners and leaders hold a competitive spirit in high regard. They often have it and hire for it. They say, “without a competitive spirit how would a business succeed, right? Not necessarily.


Today’s business environment also requires tremendous teamwork collaboration. Innovation needs it. Sales needs it. Superior customer experience needs it. Project completion needs it. In truth, teamwork collaboration is absolutely essential for business success.





It doesn’t have to.



Teamwork Collaboration: Check Your Competitive Beliefs!

Leaders, what are your competitive beliefs doing to your teams’ interaction and collaboration? It’s an important question. Attitude and beliefs drive your behavior and the culture of your organization.

  1. Do you equate collaboration with weakness, laziness, even failure? Your initial answer may be no! Do your actions prove that out? Do you truly value, respect, and elevate high collaborators?

    Do you see collaborators as leaders who can build that culture? Or do you place them under competitive employees? Whom do you promote to a higher position? Great collaborators or individualists with a competitive spirit?


  2. Do you believe collaborators need coddling? In a recent chat, one leader proclaimed he doesn’t have time to coddle people. He prefers competitive types. Coddle?

    True collaborators are not super sensitive people who demand constant support. They are talented employees who know how to initiate ideas and work with others to reach a collective result. If you believe you must coddle collaborators, you may kill teamwork collaboration.


  3. Do you believe that progress stagnates without rivalry and competition? Some people need rivalry to work hard. Yet, natural collaborators find it a huge turnoff. To them it’s distracting. They are already motivated to work hard with others. Rivalry is the antithesis of this.

  4. Do you think that competition builds strength, confidence and backbones? Not in everyone. Many collaborators are motivated through synergy of talents not contests of conquering. Moreover, natural collaborators are not spineless weak adults who lack confidence. They are strong enough to have their own voice and honor others’ as well.

    Leaders, how are your team members motivated? Through competition or collaboration? If you are leading with a competitive philosophy because it’s comfortable for you, you may be killing teamwork collaboration.




How well do you understand the collaborative mind?


Leaders inspire teamwork collaboration when they …

  • Know their teams members and what inspires them. “Celebrate those who compete, celebrate those who collaborate. An ocean refuses no river.” ~@AJManik

  • Recognize when competition is creating a deadlock and help team members see why it’s happening. This is important when you have competitors and collaborators on the same team.

  • Overcome the myth that collaboration is everyone thinking the same thing. It isn’t. It’s diverse views without the mindset of who’s right/wrong and who’s going to win. Help team members learn to disagree with respect, to reach collaborative results.

  • Remember that initiative is different from competition. Initiative and a can-do attitude are always valuable. They keep the business moving toward success. Yet, competition sometimes kills much needed teamwork collaboration.

  • Address domineering non-collaborators even if they are great individual performers. If you justify their behavior with their results you undermine teamwork collaboration.








What progress truly requires is initiative, can-do attitudes, critical thinking, innovation, and great execution. You can find this in both natural competitors AND collaborators. Know who you are leading and inspire them to great heights!


Competitor or collaborator – Which do you think makes a better leader?

Which do you prefer as a leader?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Book Keynotes:
GPS Your Brain to Work w/ Any Personality Type
Leaders, Be a Buoy of Inspiration & Balance


More Blog Posts on Related Topics:
Are You an Annoying Maverick or a Welcome Initiator?
Teamwork Collaboration: Do You Welcome People In or Push Them Out?

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Is Leadership a Contest? Tell us what you think in Sunday’s People Skills Chat.

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday Aug. 3, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



Is Leadership a Contest?

Is everything a competition? Is that what leadership is in its core? Some say yes and others say no.

Greg Richardson weighed in with his post Leadership is Not a Contest. It gave us much to ponder and inspired our upcoming people skills chat.


Is Leadership a Contest? Image is People skills logo

Is Leadership a Contest? Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Is Leadership a Contest? If Not, What Is It?

Do we lead to conquer and win? Do we lead to collaborate and create win/win? It’s an interesting subject that impacts people and results.

Some questions to get us thinking in advance of Sunday’s #Peopleskills Twitter chat:

  • “Competition brings out the best in products and the worst in people.” ~David Sarnoff founder of RCA Agree/Disagree?
  • What attitudes in leaders make leadership a contest?
  • If you don’t see life as a contest, can you be successful as a leader? Pls. explain.
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of seeing leadership as a competition/contest?
  • How do competition and motivation relate?
  • Do you see yourself as more competitive or collaborative? Why?
  • What do competition and collaboration have in common?
  • How can very collaborative people work for/with competitive types?
  • For competitive leaders to be successful, what attitudes must they hire in others?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.



So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community on Sunday Aug. 3, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your creative views and experience in our people skills chat on Is Leadership a Contest?


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to this week’s inspiration for this post Greg Richardson and the people skills community. Continued thanks to generous chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes for their time and contributions.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday Aug. 3, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights and perspective on Is Leadership a Contest?

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.






TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. Aug. 3rd, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Twitter Chat “Is Leadership a Contest?”



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Leadership: Persistence vs. Resistance to Change


Persistence is frequently touted as a critical success quality. Babe Ruth’s famous quote, “It’s hard to beat a person who never gives up” is only one of many proclamations that has exalted persistence.


When we lead teams through change, we hope that everyone will persist through tough times. Persistence is a tremendous strength — unless it’s actually distorted change resistance that blocks success.


Seeing the difference minimizes this risk. As leaders we are more likely to engage employees in innovation when we persist to a goal not when we resist new ideas. In business, we need both persistence and agility to reach a vision.


Persistence. Image is Tree trunk up against iron fence.

Persistence or Change Resistance? Image by:stevefaeembra

Grateful for image by Steve Faeembra via Flickr Creative Commons License.


The exalted status of persistence can distort our thinking to believe there are only two options — persistence or surrender. Surrender screams defeat to the psyche. It brings many people to mistakenly persist just to avoid feeling like a quitter or a failure. This is truly an unfortunate choice for there are more than two options.

Instead of thinking, “know when to hold ‘em and know when to fold ‘em”, we succeed when we …




Persistence: Perseverance Not Stubbornness

We can persist toward a goal by changing the course of arrival. We don’t have to fly into a storm. We can change course, go around it, and still arrive!

Persistence to success requires change ability. Let’s not persist in methods and moments; let’s persist in reaching success. We don’t have to walk away; we can walk another way.

Innovate the approach when the current path,

  • Is directly into harms way
  • Is truly slowing progress
  • Is eroding morale and confidence
  • Is against core values
  • Is illegal
  • Is crushing with negativity



AND

when other paths,

  • Can achieve the goal more easily or with unique benefits
  • Engage talents more effectively
  • Connect with positive resources and helpful people
  • Inspire creativity, spirit, and productivity



Vitality shows not only in the ability to persist, but in the ability to start over.” ~F. Scott Fitzgerald



Question/change the goal when it,

  • Blocks a positive future
  • Tries to hold onto the past or rewrite history
  • Denies or sidesteps the truth
  • Points to a far better goal



It is much easier to change a goal or a path when we see it as growth instead of failure. Successful people embrace this truth. They lead teams to embrace and develop agility.

They have more than just persistence. They …


  1. See futility sooner
  2. Quickly learn and correct course
  3. Balance vision between their intuition and what is actually happening
  4. Change course courageously without fear of the short term detour
  5. Have greater desire for success than the comfort of habit
  6. Believe that the opposite of persistence is not laziness




Sometimes changing course is THE method for reaching success — in business and in life. Meanwhile, inaction can turn change resistors into comfortable sitting ducks for those who are both persistent and agile in finding success.


What ONE thought moves you past change resistance to reach success?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership: Do You See Patience or Inaction?
Change Leaders: Is the Beloved Bully — Habit — Stopping You?

©2012-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

The word leader used to mean strong, directive, and unemotional. That picture has shifted to less directive and more in touch with employees’ needs.


Yet where is the balance between results-focused and people-focused? In tough moments …

Are you too nice to lead?



Are You Too Nice to Lead, Effectively?

Image by: SeanbJack via Creative Commons License.


There are team members who want, welcome, and will only work for a nice leader — until they see that the nice leader won’t address poor performance and cannot negotiate tough issues with other teams and management.

They feel unprotected and at the mercy of slacking team members and other teams. So much for leaders being nice!

When Might You Be Too Nice to Lead?


  1. With Fear of Conflict. If you tend to avoid conflict and want people to just work things out for themselves, you may be seen as too nice to lead.

    Alternative: Get a coach to help you develop your conflict resolution skills. Great leaders move past their fear. They know when to step in and even teach others how to work together.


  2. In Times of Great Change. In everyday work, your teams think of you as a very effective leader. Then the organization announces a major change and you must lead your teams through it. The tension rises and your teams resist. In this moment of truth, do you lead them forward? If you cave in to their objections and resistance, your boss may see you as too nice to lead.

    Alternative: Have the courage to draw on the good will you have with your team. Show them you believe in them and in the change. If you don’t believe it, why should they?


  3. When You Require Emotional Support. Being humble and less directive can be good for your team as respects and taps their talent and commitment. Showing no confidence and needing constant emotional support can scare the bejeebers out of them and earn you the label of too nice or weak to lead.

    Alternative: Learn and understand the interplay between being confident and being humble. Confidence is strength for your team. Humbleness opens the door to growth. Both are valuable leadership traits. Lack of confidence isn’t.


  4. If You Must Be Liked. Needing to be liked can steer you to many poor leadership behaviors. It can drive you to sacrifice results for the virtual hug. This can earn you the label of too nice to lead.

    Alternative: Be like-able without seeking to be liked.


  5. When You Get Promoted. Picture yourself leading your former peers and even being a peer of your former boss. Guilt or feelings of unworthiness can make you seem timid or too solicitous. This can earn you the label of too nice to lead.

    Alternative: Your boss or another leader put their faith in you. You were promoted for a reason. The team you lead needs your courage and talent. Even if some team members grouse in jealousy, the team’s success depends on your willingness to do the job. Embrace the responsibility you were given; don’t trigger the decision maker’s doubt and regret. Believe in yourself, the purpose, and the team. Lead.


  6. If You Own Their Behavior. When you mistakenly believe that you are responsible for a team member’s behavior, you are at risk of giving an errant employee too many chances. You may take their behavior as your failure. If you are coaching one of your team members and they are not making progress, would you be able to tell them they are no longer on the team? If not, you may earn the label of too nice to lead.

    Alternative: Afford your team members the adult responsibility of owning their own behavior. Coach, teach, guide, and lead them. But let them own their own behavior!


  7. When Your Career is Paramount. When you care about your career growth more than the current position, you may inappropriately say yes to other teams or management requests. You are busy pleasing everyone else and your current team’s success may suffer. If you are lucky, this may earn you the label of too nice to lead. If you are not lucky, it may earn you a different label that isn’t fit for print. Either way, it’s not what a great leader does.

    Alternative: Let current successes, appropriate interactions, and great negotiation pave your career path.




As the definition of leadership has shifted from rough directive behavior to engaging employees, some leaders veer off course and focus only on happiness.


Rediscover the balance and you foster success for all!







You can be liked and fail as a leader; you can be disliked and fail as a leader.

Seek and practice balance and you will succeed!


From professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2011-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.

Related Posts:
Leadership: Can You Be Friends With Those You Lead? Yes If …
6 Steps to Lead With Honesty & Civility
10 Ways to Ignite Greatness Without Leaving Scars


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Team Harmony: Is it at odds with great results?

It doesn’t have to be. When teams are united in their goal and are willing to adapt to reach it, you can have both team harmony and great results.


Team Harmony: Image are zen rocks stacked but tipping.

Team Harmony: Leaders, Are You Sacrificing Greatness? Image by Alexandra Stevenson via Flickr.

Grateful for image by Alexandra Stevenson via Flickr Creative Commons License.




Yet leaders who are very focused on team harmony and morale, sometimes sacrifice great results to keep morale and harmony alive.


  • They accept low performance issues to avoid upset vs. addressing issues through engagement, coaching, re-assignments, or dismissals.
  • They tolerate change resistance of a few instead of leading all team members through it.
  • They stomach the pessimist’s constant negativity instead of asking them for creativity, alternatives, and solutions.



Leadership: Great Results and Team Harmony!

Leaders, you don’t have to choose between team harmony/morale and great results.

  1. Bring out the best performance of each team member by making them aware of where they need to improve. Improvement starts with awareness, grows with coaching and training, and finishes with individual ownership and commitment. Team members can coach each other by sharing insights, expertise, and encouragement. This builds both team harmony and great results.

  2. Know the difference between true change resistors and people grappling with change. True change resistors argue endlessly against the change. People grappling with change ask how-to questions, contribute ideas to discussions, and take action to achieve it.

    Once you spot true change resistors, make it clear what different behaviors are needed. To lead change, you must be willing to teach, guide, and call everyone to high expectations. Be ready to make changes in team make-up if resistors continue to resist. Team harmony and morale sustain themselves when everyone is contributing instead of resisting.


  3. Have the team discuss the difference between skepticism and pessimism. What words and actions distinguish the two? There is a fair amount of confusion about it. Skeptics raise healthy questions about risk, possibilities, and pathways. They keep reality in focus and hope and optimism alive.

    Ardent pessimists are saying no. They close the door instead of opening new ones with appropriate caution. Left unchecked, they can crush both team harmony/morale and great results.





  4. Now for the tough one leaders …

  5. Replace managers who are consistently negative, highly change resistant, or very insecure and arrogant. If you want team harmony/morale and great results, the managers leading the teams must be open to change, able to engage others, and both optimistic and realistic. Teams dealing with highly negative, insecure, arrogant, change resistant managers have lower team harmony/morale and weaker results. These managers determine the speed and distance your organization can travel and the results it can achieve.



What front line management behaviors do you find most important to team harmony and great results?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership: 5 Essentials to Spark Team Agility
Leadership Morale Challenge: How Long Do You Coach a Bad Attitude?
Leaders, Employee Engagement is Uniquely Personal

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

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