Listening Power

Franchisees must follow franchise rules. In fact, some brands actually look for frenchisees who are comfortable following rules.


Yet customers don’t care about the rules. They want a great experience and rules don’t deliver it. Here’s the question. Do the franchise rules stop super customer experience? They don’t have to.


Franchisees: Image is Customer Service Checklist Excellent Good Poor

Franchisees: Rules Need Not Stop Super Customer Experience

Image licensed from Istock.com


Franchisees: Amaze Customers With These Top Tips

Despite the franchise rules, you can wow customers with a great customer experience.

  1. Inspire service workers to care. Start each shift with a service motto. Use one example each day of how the workers make a difference! Inspire workers to care before you teach them to smile.

  2. Give each customer your full attention. Customers are becoming more and more insulted by distracted workers. At check out counters, workers are chatting with friends while scanning customer purchases. They are texting and talking on the phone while customers wait for service. Attention is one of the easiest ways to show customers you care. It is the first impression you give and sets the tone for the interaction.

  3. Smile. You’ve read it before and I say it again. Customers have chosen to come to your business. A smile says welcome and thank you. It defuses their tension. Everyone has struggles. You can lighten their load and make a difference.


  4. Listen. Make sure you know what customers want. Restate what the customer asks for. Listen for special requests. One drive-through customer stressed they didn’t want any ketchup on their burger. As they drove away and reached into the bag, they found a burger with ketchup. They came back with the burger — very upset.

  5. Double check before you deliver. Had the worker checked the order before giving the burger to the customer, they would have prevented the bad experience.

  6. Blame no one. In a family style chain restaurant, the customer at the table next to mine told the server he brought the wrong order. He then blamed the customer. “That’s what you pointed to on the menu.” Had he restated the customer’s order before sending it into the kitchen, he would have prevented the problem.

  7. Let the customers have their say. When customers are upset, don’t interrupt them. Don’t say calm down. They don’t take orders. Customers aren’t in your army. If you let them speak, they will come up for air. Then show them some empathy and work to resolve the problem.


  8. Franchisees: Quote says Everybody has their own struggle. So be kind.

    Be kind. It creates a great customer experience.

    Image via quoteeveryday.com



Successful franchisees strive and know how to create an irresistible customer experience despite the rules. Their customers rave about the service to their friends and family.


As franchisees, they inspire great service attitudes. So hire friendly employees. Model great service and train service workers to deliver it. Appreciate their work and recognize their efforts.

Franchisees: Caring Words Cost Nothing: Image is a poster with those words.

Treat employees well. Be the model of how to treat customers! Remember always that business rules need not stop a super customer experience.

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™


Let’s do a customer service workshop or webinar for your service workers. Together we can make a difference! Ph: 908.595.1515.


Related Post:
24 Customer Service Tips to Make It Easy for Customers
11 Surefire Beliefs for Superior Customer Experience

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Bluntness Bombs Out: Here’s Why!

As The People Skills Coach™, I often coach leaders, managers, and technical professionals on steps to move from bluntness to helpful honesty. For people who are inspired by logic to change their behavior, here are 6 smart logical reasons why bluntness bombs out.


Bluntness: Image is sign that says Logic Lane.

Bluntness Bombs Out for 6 Logical People Skills Reasons Image by:Rupert Brun

Image by Rupert Brun via Flickr Creative Commons License.


6 Logical People Skills Reasons Bluntness Bombs Out


  1. No Warm-Up. Picture your bluntness as very cold water. If you push someone into a cold swimming pool, they remember the shock. If you let them wade in, they adjust to the temperature and function well. If you want people to hear and embrace your message, don’t shock them with bluntness.

  2. Punching Dulls the Brain. Punching bags are not known for their performance. They hang and swing. If you are blunt to effect a change, those you verbally punch may swing away from you. They are not likely to understand your message or change behavior.

  3. Bluntness builds barriers. Communication is for connection. Bluntness can create a busy signal — a barrier — between communicator and listener. If someone isn’t listening, your message essentially bombs out.

  4. Bluntness undermines respect and credibility. The strength of the message is weakened by the rudeness of the approach. Who is going to respect and believe the message delivered by a blunt oaf?

  5. Bluntness breaks bonds. Most people aren’t hermits. They interact and build bonds with others to survive and thrive. Bluntness may get your words out but it bombs out by breaking important bonds. It may even create vengeful feelings and start a verbal war.

  6. Bluntness focuses on your needs and overlooks others. It screams selfishness. It lacks emotional intelligence. It’s no wonder that bluntness turns others off.



Many leaders resort to bluntness out of frustration. When diplomatic honesty doesn’t seem to be working, they swing over to bluntness. Others resort to bluntness when they lose patience with those who don’t seem to understand their message or won’t listen.

Yet when you reach the end of your rope, why cut it with bluntness? Unless you need to use bluntness to save a life or prevent death, hold on to the rope!

Take a moment and tap your intellect, logic, and people skills to find a way to communicate with honesty and respect. It’s far more effective than bluntness.



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Post:
Reduce Conflict: Hear the Urgency Before the Yell
6 Key Reasons Executives Get Annoyed w/ You

©2011-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Prevent the Negative Effects of Being Too Positive!


Is your positive attitude helping yourself and others? It often can. Yet, have you ever met someone who overlooks empathy and drives their positive attitude on others?

When extremely positive people don’t account for others’ needs, their positive outlook can backfire.  They can come across as patronizing, controlling, and oddly enough, insensitive.


Negative Effects of Being Positive image is Smiley Face Cube Glowing

Negative Effects of Being Positive Image by Kristin Resurreccion via Flickr.


Grateful to Kristin Resurreccion for the image via Flickr Creative Commons License.

5 Ways to Prevent the Negative Effects of Being Positive

I have a very positive attitude about life and deliver inspirational keynotes to lift others up. I have also met people who try to convert me to their version of optimism before seeing how positive I already am!  This turns me off to what they have to offer.


To prevent this misstep …

  1. Listen in the moment and understand others’ perspectives.  Listening builds trust through respect of others’ needs.  Sometimes people are so busy encouraging others to be positive they don’t stop and detect what others need at that moment.  Everyone is on a journey and they travel at different speeds.   Some get to a positive attitude faster than others.  Some don’t even want to go there.  

    Exception: If you are a leading an organization through change and a true resistor is slowing the pace with negativity, you will need to address that very clearly to ensure the momentum of change.


  2. Acknowledge and empathize.  Empathy doesn’t mean you agree. It means you matter, we matter this matters. Connect with empathy to build the trust needed to influence others.

  3. Coach only when asked.  In everyday life, don’t elect yourself someone else’s life coach.  Even positive words like “I would like to encourage you to …” are somewhat arrogant if the person didn’t ask for your help.   Live and enjoy your own positive attitude but don’t declare yourself Ruler of PositiveLand and issue decrees.  You may become known as a royal pain in the tail.

  4. Blend optimism with realism. It opens the door to empathy and builds credibility. It is much easier to connect and trust someone who has their feet on the ground as they reach for the stars.

  5. Disagree honestly and with respect. Become comfortable with honest respectful disagreement.  People disagree in life.  Working through disagreements often delivers great results.  Yet sometimes extremely positive people patronize during a disagreement because they seek immediate harmony.  Disagreement can be a positive if it is done respectfully.




Live positively and let others see your optimism and positive choices. Blend it with empathy and realism and you ascend to trust, respect, and the long reach of influence.


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership Optimism: Keeping It Real
When Strong Leaders Use Empathy

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Handling Conflict is our people skills chat topic this Sunday.

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday Sept. 28, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



Handling Conflict: The People Skills Way

Handling conflict is a one of the most valuable people skills. It is essential for working and living together. It respects all views and and discovers win-win solutions. So we gather for this chat to explore handling conflict the people skills way.


My co-host for this chat is Michael Cortes, education & presentation coach. Michael suggested this topic and is looking forward to engaging with everyone this Sunday.


Handling Conflict. Image is People skills logo

Handling Conflict. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Handling Conflict With Great People Skills

JOIN us Sunday at 10am ET in #peopleskills Twitter chat to share your views and experience on handling conflict.

Some questions to get us thinking in advance:

  • How do you define conflict?
  • What is the difference between disagreement and conflict? Is there a difference?
  • Would you rather be around a constant peacemaker, a person who sticks to their views, or __________?
  • “Ideas and not battles mark the forward progress of mankind.” ~L. Ron Hubbard Ag/Disagree?
  • How do you feel when you sense a conflict is developing?
  • Fear of conflict – where does it come from? How can people overcome it?
  • What factors make conflict difficult to handle?
  • How do interactions turn into conflict?
  • What types of conflicts can develop when people work together and why?
  • How do people skills resolve conflict?
  • What skills do leaders need to handle conflict among team members?

These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.



So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community on Sunday Sept 28, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your creative views and experience in our people skills chat on handling conflict.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to my co-host this week Michael Cortes, and to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Continued thanks to generous chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes for their time and contributions.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday Sept. 28, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on handling conflict.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.






TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. Sept. 28, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Twitter Chat about handling conflict.

Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Reduce Conflict: 5 Places to Hear the Urgency Before the Yell

As The People Skills Coach™, I often teach others how to deal with people’s anger in the workplace and reduce conflict. Does your boss yell? Has a team member suddenly become edgy with you? Has a customer surprised you with a yell?

Reduce Conflict: Image is bee w/ magnifying glass.

Reduce Conflict: Hear the Urgency Before the Yell Image: Istock.

Image licensed from Istock.com


If you don’t like to be yelled at, develop one of the most valuable people skills to reduce conflict:

Hear the urgency before the yell!



Often when the boss, a teammate, or a customer yells, you have missed the urgency they were communicating before the yell. It’s not your fault and this is not about blame. Yet hearing the urgency before the yell can give you what you want — less conflict!

In the face of urgency and a listener who doesn’t hear it, someone may resort to a yell. I am not speaking about people who yell all the time. I am referring to people who suddenly start to yell.

Reduce Conflict: 5 Places to Hear Urgency Before the Yell!

  1. Hear urgency in repetition. When they calmly say the same thing twice, hear their urgency and acknowledge it — before the yell. If you remain silent because you are pondering what they said, the next thing you hear may be a yell. To them silence means you don’t care. Tell them you are thinking not ignoring them.


  2. Hear urgency in their lack of knowledge. Your expertise blinds you to their urgency. As they speak, your knowledge is calmly telling you that you can handle it. Speak up. Nicely reassure them that you can handle it. Communicate solutions sooner to reduce conflict and prevent the yell.

  3. Hear urgency in the painful past or impending future. Many times people’s urgency comes from previous negative experiences that caused them pain or something they are anticipating. Ask great questions while people are calm to uncover their concerns — before the yell. When you uncover the fear, you find the urgency and reduce conflict.

  4. Hear urgency in the need to be acknowledged. Urgency is not always a deadline for action. Often people’s urgency resides in their need to be heard. Tell them that you hear what they are saying. Paraphrase (not parrot) what they have said. Acknowledging people can prevent the yell and reduce conflict.

  5. Hear urgency in the bigger picture. Example: I was teaching a public class. The banquet room was to be setup by 7:30am so I could prepare before greeting the students. I walked in to see a room configured incorrectly and no flip charts.

    I calmly spoke with the hotel rep about re-configuring room and the time frame needed. Ten minutes later there was still no change. I then said, “Fix this now!”. He replied, “that’s good, you woke me up” and quickly fixed the problem. To him, my calm voice at the beginning meant it wasn’t urgent. Had he looked at the bigger picture of my need to prepare before people arrived, he would have heard the urgency in the calm — before the yell.



Bonus Tip: The more you know about people, the easier it is to reduce conflict and prevent the yell. Learn what annoys them (pet peeves), their personality types, their fears and goals, their frustrations, and how best to respond before the yell.





You can create positive, proactive, productive interactions in business.





What have surprising outbursts taught you about reducing conflict in business?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™


Related Posts:
6 Key Reasons Executive Leaders Get Annoyed w/ You
Reduce Conflict: Listen While You Speak

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Listening Beyond Our Boundaries: Risk Free Success!


Listening Beyond Our Boundaries: Image is person breaking through and emerging through a wall.

Listening Beyond Our Boundaries. Image licensed from Istock.com

Image licensed from Istock.com


We succeed in leadership, teamwork, employee engagement, customer service and relationships in general when we listen beyond our boundaries.

Listening beyond our boundaries solves problems and prevents problems. It turns perceived gaps into understanding. It magically draws people together to do the impossible. There is nothing to stop us.


All we need to do is get started!


Listening Beyond Our Boundaries: 2 Minute Quick Start Video









When has listening beyond your boundaries created surprising results?

How can we help others to listen beyond their boundaries?

Or must everyone do it on their own?


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Post:
Listening Responsibility: Listen While We Speak!

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Listening Responsibility: Listen While We Speak!


Do you get annoyed when people try to interact with you while you are speaking to them? Do you see it as an interruption?

You may be defining listening as complete silence until you are done. If so, you may also be overlooking your listening responsibility.


Listening Responsibility: Image is olive oil pouring through funnel strainer.

Listening Responsibility: Listen for Input While You Speak!

Image courtesy of Williams-Sonoma product catalog.


Unless our purpose is to preach or make a speech, great communication requires that we listen for input while we speak. This is our listening responsibility for true connection.


What kind of input?

  • Non-verbal cues like negative facial expressions, a hand up, heads turning away, people walking away. If we overlook these and keep on talking, our message to others is one of power not care and connection.

  • Polite requests to jump in. Phrases like — excuse me or pardon me or sorry I have to go — signal a need. If we show annoyance at being interrupted, we communicate a desire to dominate and please ourselves rather than connect with others.

  • Input that keeps everyone connected. If people aren’t with us, who are we communicating with? Speaking without allowing input, disengages and disconnects.



Listening Responsibility: 5 Reasons People Interrupt Us

When we speak, people may jump in for various reasons.

  1. They are confused. People who tell me they hate interruptions believe that if people would just let them finish speaking, the confusion would disappear. However, they discount how people feel when they are confused. Waiting prolongs and intensifies the pain of confusion. To communicate and connect, allow people to jump in to clarify and eliminate their confusion.

  2. We are confused. Picture yourself speaking with a customer. They ask a question and we begin to answer it. They jump in when they realize we misunderstood their question. Our listening responsibility is to hear what we misunderstood as soon as possible. Great service comes through dialogue not monologue.

  3. They are seeing disaster that we don’t see. The purpose for speaking can create tunnel vision. As others hear what we are saying, they may jump in to prevent our feet from being stuck in our mouths. Instead of being annoyed at the interruption, consider the helpful input they offer.

  4. We don’t know how they think. Picture presenting to decision makers you don’t know. You start your presentation and they quickly jump in and ask questions. Listen to this input. They are telling you how they think and how they decide. Turn their gift into your success! Don’t resist their input as an interruption. Project your desire to serve not your need for power.

  5. Something has changed. Things can change from the moment we start to speak to the moment people jump in. Perhaps they need to leave suddenly. Maybe we’ve said something that completely changes the topic and view. While we speak, our listening responsibility is to be aware of what is changing and adapt to close the gap.




Speaking is not output. It is output in response to input that is flowing at you. Embrace this input. Connect with others by listening while you speak. Reach ‘em, don’t preach ‘em!


Your turn: When have you embraced input instead of being annoyed at it?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership: Are You Communicating w/ Honesty & Civility?
People Skills: The Secret Within Every Great Communicator
Career Success: Are You Rocking w/ These 13 People Skills?

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Seeing Inside Others is our people skills chat topic this Sunday.

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday Aug. 17, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



Seeing Inside Others for Stronger Connection

The events of this week inspired Tom Rhodes to write this special blog post: What’s on the Inside? His post inspires our people skills chat this Sunday.


Seeing Inside Others. Image is People skills logo

Seeing Inside Others. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Seeing Inside Others

In every aspect of our lives — at home and at work — we interact with many people. How well do we get to know them? Do we see only what we want to see? In the process, do we burden them with our expectations? Much to explore on this topic.

Some questions to get us thinking in advance of Sunday’s #Peopleskills Twitter chat:

  • Seeing inside others — is it possible?
  • What more would you want to know about others — beyond the surface?
  • Do people block others from seeing inside of them? Why?
  • How do cultural & childhood messages block seeing inside others?
  • How do we move from analyzing others to supporting others? Do you want to?
  • How can a balanced view of life and others benefit you?
  • Showing pain – is it accepted in society?
  • “Laugh and the world laughs w/ you. Cry and you cry alone.” What’s the effect of this message?
  • What fears, if any, stop us from seeing inside others? Does deep emotion and vulnerability scare us?
  • Do we worship strength and disdain vulnerability?
  • Why don’t we see inside others more often?
  • How can we learn to be more supportive without becoming co-dependent?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.



So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community on Sunday Aug. 17, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your creative views and experience in our people skills chat about seeing inside others.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to Tom Rhodes for the inspiration for this chat. Continued thanks to the people skills community and generous chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes for their time and contributions.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday Aug. 17, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on seeing inside others.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.






TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. Aug. 17, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Twitter Chat about seeing inside others for stronger connection.

Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Irresistible Customer Experience: The Core Truth

An irresistible customer experience is not the tough unachievable summit many leaders and teams picture. There are things that every customer wants to hear and wants to experience.

Irresistible Customer Experience: Image is pictoquote of Make positive thinking our way of life.

Irresistible Customer Experience: What Every Customer Wants! Image by: BK Symphony of Love

Image by BK Symphony of Love via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Irresistible Customer Experience: What Everyone Wants

An irresistible experience …

  • Is pleasurable.
  • Makes us feel wanted.
  • Puts us in a positive light.
  • Gives us something we really want.
  • Surprises us with something positive we didn’t even know we wanted.
  • Gets better and better each time.
  • Reawakens pleasant feelings we had before.
  • Prevents or relieves difficulty or pain.
  • Elevates us in some way.



An irresistible experience doesn’t …

  • Inflict pain.
  • Confuse.
  • Demean.
  • Manipulate.
  • Ignore.
  • Require anger for action.



What customers want to hear …

  1. Welcome. We’re happy you’re here.
  2. Thank you for being our customer.
  3. You’re the reason we exist.
  4. We like serving you.
  5. We respect your choices.
  6. We’re glad you’re back.
  7. We’re listening.
  8. We work hard so you won’t have to.
  9. You’re worth it.
  10. We’re sorry you’re having trouble. Let us fix it!
  11. We will make this easy for you.



Marketing folks capture this core truth of irresistible customer experience in the company tag lines they write. So why do so many companies with great tag lines struggle with delivering an irresistible customer experience?


They make the simple truth complicated!

  • They don’t believe that customer experience is critical to financial success. Yet the simple truth is, customers leave when the experience they have with your company is mediocre or bad.
  • They mistrust customers and thus hedge on giving. Irresistible customer experience becomes unattainable.
  • They mistrust employees and thus don’t empower them. Say goodbye to irresistible customer experience.
  • They become metric-centric instead of customer-centric. Customers don’t list great metrics as an irresistible customer experience!
  • They believe that only small companies can deliver an irresistible customer experience very time. They think that scaling up makes wowing the customer impossible. This belief blocks the possibility. If you can’t envision it, it won’t happen.




However, when we remember the core truth of what every customer wants, we are well on the way to delivering an irresistible customer experience every single time.





Irresistible Customer Experience: Image is "Thank You Cards"

Irresistible Customer Experience: The Simple Core Truth Image by: KatrinaAlana

Image by Katrina Alana via Flickr Creative Commons License.



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Customer Experience Superstars & The Irresistible Things They Give
Customer Experience Vibe: Are You Being Generous or Greedy
Fake Empowerment: The True Cost to Customer Experience


©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

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Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Extreme Leadership? Try Balance Instead!


Extreme Leadership: Image is person on high wire w/ balance pole.

Extreme Leadership: Balance & Moderation Doesn’t Mean Mediocrity Image: OrangeBrompton


Image courtesy of Orange Bromopton via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Times change and so must leadership. With cultural diversity in the virtual workplace and generational differences challenging comfort zones, leaders must focus on balance and blend not just extreme leadership.  

Leaders, be careful of thinking that extreme actions will push the organization over the top! It may push it over the cliff instead.



Leadership is no longer just about blazing trails and pushing people to do the same.  It’s about finding balance and moderation AND not confusing it with status quo and mediocrity.  


In my blog post for Todd Nielsen’s 2014 International Leadership blogathon, I offer 3 specific extremes to avoid and what to do instead. There’s a discussion heating up on it at Todd’s blog. Read and discuss at Extreme Leadership: Do You Seek Excellence Only in Extremes?

 

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Listening Lapses: Lessons From Laughable Moments


As The People Skills Coach™, I love learning about people through real-time interactions. It’s especially interesting when the listening lapses are funny or absurd.


Laughable Listening Lapses: Image is a comical character made with marshmallows.

Listening Lapses: 3 Laughable Learning Moments.

Image licensed from Istock.com.

Listening Lapses: Laughable Learning Moments

  1. Fast food fandango.

    I pulled into a fast food drive through. I wasn’t familiar with the chain so I asked: Do you have a green salad w/ grilled chicken on it? The young man replied: We don’t have any Greek salads. Realizing the transmission error, I said: No no, not Greekgreen. You know, lettuce. He then replied: Well ma’am, all our salads have lettuce.

    Lesson Learned: Expecting others to understand what we see as common sense is just as absurd as the listening lapse itself.


  2. Quibbling questions.

    The gate agent called pre-boarding for priority customers. She asked that everyone else stay seated.

    As we stood in line, a passenger who just arrived in the gate area asked the woman behind me if she was in priority. The woman snapped back: Yes, I can follow directions. The stunned traveler just stared at the woman. Then another recently arrived passenger asked the stunned traveler, is this the priority boarding line? The stunned traveler replied: Yes it is. Just don’t ask her, she’ll bite your head off!

    Lesson Learned: When something seems odd or absurd, assume positive intent. The positive is just as likely as the negative and it prevents embarrassment. Moreover, it can even turn a negative moment into a positive one!


  3. Messages that transcend words.

    My friend and I were preparing a Latin dance showcase with our two teachers who were from Eastern Europe. When my friend explained to them they were playing the part of two hot guys, they looked puzzled. We weren’t connecting. The teachers conferred with each other in their native language and then said to us: “Oh, like Chip and Dish Dancers!”

    Lesson Learned: Language doesn’t have to be a barrier to communication. Where there’s a will, there’s a way. Use whatever you know to get you there!





Listening lapses and interaction miss-hits can frustrate us or teach us. If we can find the humor in them, we strengthen our people skills and live a happier life.



Your Turn!

What humorous interactions have you had and what did you learn?



Last tip, if you can’t find the humor in frustrating moments, try these pleasures that calm when dealing with toxic people.


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Customer Experience Vibe: Do Customers See You as Generous or Greedy?

Customer Experience Vibe: Image is a Gift Box With Gold Bow

Customer Experience Vibe: Generous or Greedy? Image by SalFalco via Flickr.

Image by: SalFalco via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Everyone knows companies are in business to make money. Yet if customers feel that is the customer experience vibe of your company, you lose. Customers can sense greed and it repulses them. 

But there is good news!



Customer Experience Vibe: Generous Not Greedy

Generosity is a giving attitude. It’s a focus on others’ needs — in this case those of the customers. A generous customer experience vibe says to customers, it’s “non-stop you” — to borrow a tagline from Lufthansa Airlines.

Generosity doesn’t mean giving away the profits. It doesn’t require deep discounts. There is significant research to show that people will actually pay more for a product or service, when the customer experience is great.


Create a generous customer experience vibe. It’s irresistible!

  • Great listening feels generous. Telling feels greedy as it seizes control of the moment. Great listening invites others’ thoughts. It is the generosity of an open-mind. It is a magnetic customer experience vibe that draws people back to you. Listen generously.

  • Flexibility feels generous. Rigidity feels greedy. One of the classic customer service training videos, Give ‘em a Pickle, tells the story of entrepreneur and restaurant owner Bob Farrell who realized that giving an extra pickle could secure customer loyalty. Just one extra pickle when the customer requested it created a generous customer experience vibe. Find ways to be flexible with customers!

  • Clarity feels generous. Smoke screens feel greedy. It gives information that feeds decisions and resolves problems. This builds trust and brings customers back. Conversely, fast talking sales reps like some car dealers I recently met, seem greedy as they withhold information and create confusion. Telephone menus (VRUs) that spin people around trying to guess the right option, seem like greedy robots that suck up customers’ time while lowering companies’ costs. Be generous. Be clear!

  • Win/win collaboration feels generous. Win/lose feels greedy. When you create the customer experience vibe of “we win when you win”, customers come back for more. When customers feel a power struggle between them and you, they move on.

  • Giving words feel generous; selling words feel greedy.

    I’ll never forget the day I purchased some cosmetics in a large well known beauty store. The sales rep was helpful and I bought what I went in for and two more items. Then the manager said to the sales rep, “nice up-selling.” This remark turned it from a positive customer experience vibe to a feeling of greedy manipulation. I never went back. Customers don’t like to be sold; but they love to buy. ~Jeffrey Gitomer


  • Respecting customers’ preferences feels generous; being handled feels greedy.

    I had an appointment with my dental hygienist and dentist for a regular cleaning and checkup. When I showed up, the hygienist led me inside, sat me in the chair, and then told me that my dentist wasn’t there that day. I could have the other dentist give me a checkup or skip it. How greedy! They decided what my options were to favor their hygienist’s schedule. They should have called me to let me know my dentist wouldn’t be there and ask me if I would like to reschedule or come at least for the cleaning. Professional service is about serving people not manipulating customers to secure revenue.






As a customer, what generous or greedy customer experience have you had?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Courtesy Checklist: 10 Superior Ways to Succeed With Customers
10 Winning Beliefs for Superior Customer Experience
Customer Experience People Skills: 5 Needless Costly Mistakes

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Conflict Resolution: You Can Stay Calm in Conflict.


As The People Skills Coach™, I am often asked for conflict resolution tips. Most especially — how to stay calm in the midst of verbal conflict.


Although taking a break can be very helpful, sometimes after the break the calm evaporates and the conflict remains. Then what?


There are also times at work when you can’t take a break. Customer service agents, sales account reps, team members working to solve a crisis are often under fixed time demands. How can they stay calm and work toward conflict resolution?

 

Conflict Resolution: Image is the word Rejuvenate.

Conflict Resolution: How to Stay Calm? Image by SweetDreamzDesign via Flickr.

Image by SweetDreamzDesign via Flickr Creative Commons License.

 

Staying Calm for Conflict Resolution

If you find yourself getting anxious in the midst of verbal conflict, these 3 steps will help you.

  1. Hear the fear and need vs. the anger and biting accusation. Behind other people’s anger and accusations, there is always a fear and/or need. Let your mind focus on finding the real issue. Hear other people’s fear to get out of fight/flight mode and into conflict resolution.
  2. When I first hear other people’s anger, I quietly ask myself …

    • Where is their fear or pain? How can I resolve this?
    • Is it that they’ve lost trust?
    • Do they believe worse things are going to follow?
    • Are they under pressure to please someone else?


  3. Know and believe your excellence is in the resolution. Other people’s anger tells your ego you are inferior. You tense up to defend it. The fact is you are not inferior. In truth, your excellence is in your ability to work it out!

  4. Learn more about your natural conflict resolution style. Self-awareness develops the mind’s ability to filter emotion. Knowing your conflict resolution style highlights the triggers you need to manage in order to stay calm. Take the Thomas-Killman Conflict Mode Instrument to learn your style.



Success soars when you can hear the fear and need behind people’s anger, outbursts, and accusations. You will solve the problems and defuse the emotion.

Your potential to turn obstacles into fixes will show everyone that your infinite career potential. You can care for customers. You can collaborate with colleagues. You can break logjams on difficult projects. You can lead others through difficult moments.


No matter how much you fear verbal conflict, you can develop the ability to stay calm. My skills have grown with practice, time, and commitment.


(Of course if you feel the person is going to physically attack, get out. It’s the wise thing to do. I speak in this post about non-physical conflict.)


What growth and success have you had in staying calm? Will you share your story here?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™


What’s next? I invite you to connect with me on Google+, LinkedIn, and Twitter. I am happy to answer your people skills questions for great customer service, employee engagement, teamwork and leading change!

 

Other Posts to Help You:
13 People Skills Tips to Rock w/ Career Success
5 Thoughts to Keep You Calm w/ Angry Customers

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

Harmony: What Does It Take to Really Hear Each Other?

Harmony: Image is balanced rocks.

Harmony: What Does It Take to Really Listen? Image licensed from Istock.com

Image licenced from Istock.com

 

In business, in life, and in world affairs, we seek the power of true harmony — without surrender.  How do we achieve this? Through great listening.  The question is:

 

What does it take to really hear each other?

 

I posed this question on social media to connections around the world and received these answers!


    To me listening takes having the willingness and ability to understand what is being said. ~@TomJ_Rhodes
    Great listeners give their undivided attention instead of being just physically present. They listen for facts as well as ideas. ~@FSonnenberg
    When we are listening to someone, we need to be honest both with ourselves and with them. If there is something we don’t understand, we need to get it clarified. ~@RoyAtkinson
    To truly hear someone, you should be able to reiterate what you’ve heard and understood, back to to the person you are having a conversation with. To be able to emphatically connect with their needs and respond accordingly. ~@gdiver62





    Pay more attention to what’s being told instead of waiting for the other person to stop talking and you thinking what you’re gonna say next. ~Rene Ferret
    Don’t fill the spaces with empty words. It is in silence I hear the most, for it is then I listen with my heart. ~@Cybuhr
    It’s hard to grasp what they are saying if focused on your own speaking and it’s much more powerful to be interested than interesting. ~@jolewitz
    Don’t listen to hear; listen to understand. ~@mooreconsortium





    Open your mind as well as your ears by discarding comebacks, prejudices, and preconceptions. ~@stratlearner
    Prevent the temptation of concluding what the speaker wants to say before finishing his or her words. ~@Khalid_Tweet





    While I agree with all the having an open mind etc… I also believe that the burden of listening falls on the communicator. Meaning, the person talking has to have the ability to frame information in a way that the listener can hear it. Conversations, especially difficult ones, go much smoother when the talker frames information in a way that the other person can hear it. ~@SabrinaLBaker





    For me listening is loving the “other” and forgetting about the “self” for that little moment. ~@MaaHoda
    Truly hearing each other requires a willingness to travel to the intersection of curiosity, respect, and transcending yourself. ~@TheHRGoddess
    In order to truly hear and take in another, there needs to be space inside. Practice getting to know, setting aside and emptying out your personal chatter and agenda. ~@BlairGlaser
    I can’t listen till I clear the clutter in my mind be it with what took place till then or planning or thinking about what is going on next. ~@rlalita
    What it takes to truly listen is to stop listening to yourself! It allows us to hear when words and emotions are in discord and ask questions to get to the heart of the matter. When both people listen on that other-focused level, it creates the space for bridges to be built where before there were only walls. ~@AlliPolin







    Being able to put yourself aside, all your own worries, thoughts, things you also would like to share with the person speaking to you — to be open enough to allow the words, feelings and thoughts of someone else to come into you. ~@AlaskaChickBlog


Harmony: Finding It Within

As I read through the answers and saw the pattern of willingness, openness, de-cluttering, and loving the other, I once again pondered — how? What stops people from listening to achieve harmony? Worries and fears of what?

  • Losing. When people see every situation as having only two options — winning/losing — it stops listening and chances for harmony. Believe in win/win!
  • Shortage. A close kin to fearing loss, is the myth that there is a shortage and one must compete for limited possibilities. It blocks the belief that harmony is success for everyone. It blocks great listening.
  • Weakness. There are people who believe any show of openness will be seen as weakness and invite abuse. Harmony is cast with this same shadow. Yet, the truth is that openness breeds understanding and respect. Influence follows!
  • Conflict. People often stay closed because they confuse disagreement with conflict. Ironic isn’t it? You can’t achieve harmony if you fear disharmony! However, communication can turn disagreement into understanding and reduce the chance of conflict.


Harmony: Surmounting Fears and Walls

Creating space for harmony does not mean being naive to those who would selfishly take without giving. So open up and listen vibrantly. You will spot inauthentic one-sided demands and request more openness for harmony. You can also suspend communication if, in the end, others do not want harmony without your surrender.

Strengthened with this self-confidence, open the gates to harmony.
 

    Remind yourself of those times in your own life when you have felt that you were genuinely heard. Many say that such an experience leaves them feeling respected and recognized as a person. That can’t be guaranteed but does seem to reflect that listening has a deep interest in who is being heard and respect for that person’s feelings and perspectives, not just in the content of what is being said. ~@DanOestreich


    Try “I hear you”. It may be a bigger gift than even “I love you”. See which works better for you. ~@AJManik




What ONE step toward harmony will you take in the year ahead?
.

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Replace 5 Emotionally Triggered Statements
People Skills: Bursting Every Assumption
12 Essential Thoughts to Proficient People Skills

©2013 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results. Kate also invites you to connect with her on Google+, LinkedIn, and Twitter. She welcomes your interaction!

Superior Customer Experience: Succeed Through Empathy.

 

Superior Customer Experience: Image is letter A+

Superior Customer Experience: Power of Empathy Image by SalFalco.

Gratitude for image by Sal Falco via Flickr Creative Commons License


When you think of superior customer experience, do you think of empathy?  Many people think of empathy mostly as something to relieve painful moments.

 

The truth is that empathy also prevents painful moments. It establishes and celebrates connections. It creates outstanding experiences.

 

You deliver superior customer experience through empathy!

 

Superior Customer Experience: The Power of Empathy

When we think and act from the customer’s perspective, we are using the power of empathy. We are building bonds for success.

  • Empathy opens listening. Stepping outside of our own perspective through empathy, puts us in listening mode. This triggers the customer’s listening as well. BAM! Bonds for superior customer experience.

  • Empathy allows us to make it easy for the customer. When we design websites with empathy for the customers’ perspectives, we make it easy for them to buy from us. BAM! Easy is a big part of superior customer experience.

  • Empathy is the messenger of care. Every time customers interact with us, our words and actions must say “we care about you”. Empathy is that messenger. BAM! Care brings customers back because it delivers superior customer experience.

  • Empathy engages employees to deliver the best. Empathetic leaders inspire team members to be empathetic with customers. These leaders build a culture of care and model it to engage everyone to superior customer experience!

  • Empathy strengthens teamwork. Superior customer experience requires great cross teamwork through the company. When teams engage in empathy and see each others’ views, they can deliver that wonderful seamless trouble free experience every customer wants.


What threatens empathy? The myth that empathy means agreement. It doesn’t! Empathy means: “You matter. We matter. This matters. Let’s collaborate.”


If we think that empathy means agreement, we block our empathy when we don’t agree with someone. We stop listening and so do they. We actually create difficult moments — the opposite of superior customer experience. When we block our empathy, we block our influence.


When we consider others’ views before responding, we are using the power of empathy. When we think of the impact of our actions before making decisions, we are using the power of empathy.


Empathy is the applause for shared interests. It draws people together for infinite possibilities and bonds for tremendous success. It opens two-way listening and the doors to great partnerships.


Empathy is the engine of superior customer experience!


Will you offer examples of how empathy delivered superior customer experience in your life?


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™

Related Post:
People Skills: Empathize Before You Analyze

©2013 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results. Kate also invites you to connect with her on Google+, LinkedIn, and Twitter. She welcomes your interaction!

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