communication

Career Communication: Do Others Take You Seriously?


Career Communication: Image is man seriously studying a game.

Career Communication: Playing Can Be Hazardous. Image via Will Vanlue.

Image by Will Vanlue via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Career Communication: Just Playing Can Be Hazardous

Occasionally I write a short post on a word or phrase that can bring you unexpected trouble. Today I raise the flag on a trendy phrase that’s becoming popular at work and in networking.


“I’m just playing at this.”



Despite the findings about the value of play at work, using this phrase can create mistrust, worry, and even indignation.

It causes trouble in career communication when …

  • You are interacting with professionals who take their work quite seriously
  • People are looking to you for help and guidance
  • You are new to the field and others are trying to bond with you



Enjoying your work is necessary for long term success. Having a sense of humor is a valuable trait.

Yet appearing whimsical in your career communication can sidetrack your success. Too many jokes, excessive ha ha’s and the phrase, I’m just playing at this, may create distance between you and others. Create bonds not distance!




Sense the attitude and mood of others. Your career communication is not about you. It’s about you connecting with others. Let others see your social intelligence, emotional intelligence, your intuition, and your serious talents and skills. It builds trust and bonds of success.


What other phrases unknowingly create distance between people?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Replace These 5 Emotionally Triggered Statements Especially at Work
People Skills: Change ONE Unfortunate Word for Great Career Communication

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Making Great First Impressions is our people skills chat topic this Sunday.

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday July 13, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



Making Great First Impressions: What Does It Truly Take?

The old saying: “You never get a second chance to make a good first impression” has stood the test of time. Although it’s origin remains in question being attributed to such diverse people as Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain, and Will rogers, the message lives on. Let’s probe what making great first impressions really takes?

Joining me as co-host for this discussion in our global #Peopleskills Twitter chat will be Dave Moore, founder of the The Moore Consortium. Dave hails from UK and reaches around the globe with his human potential transformation workshops (#HPTTransformation) for business and sales success.


Making Great First Impressions: Image is People skills logo

Making Great First Impressions. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Making Great First Impressions At Work and In Life!

Dave Moore suggested this people skills chat topic of making great first impressions because image can build or break down barriers. Yet, this topic is often overlooked as people prepare for their careers or start their businesses.

As Dave puts it, “Being seen as someone who is confident, calm, friendly, and approachable is the key to building, rather than burning, bridges. It is about energy, how you say what you need to say, how you treat people, how you speak to people and how you behave.”

This is a great people skills chat topic with so much to probe and ponder. Some questions to get us thinking in advance of Sunday’s #Peopleskills Twitter chat:

  • How do you see yourself? What first impression do you make? Do others agree?
  • What memories do you create when meeting others for the first time?
  • How can we project confidence without arrogance?
  • Making great first impressions: Is it a partnership or individual responsibility?
  • How can we overcome assumptions and stereotypes in making great first impressions?
  • When/how do goals and beliefs impact making great first impressions?
  • How do we ensure that the lasting impression is worth lasting?
  • How do we show we are worthy of other people’s trust and build trust that will last?
  • How do we get a connection that will remain for a long time?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.



So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community on Sunday July 13, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your creative views and experience in our people skills chat about making great first impressions.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to this week’s co-host Dave Moore and the people skills community. Continued thanks to generous chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes for their time and contributions.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday July 13, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on making great first impressions.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.






TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. July 13, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Twitter Chat about making great first impressions.

Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

The word leader used to mean strong, directive, and unemotional. That picture has shifted to less directive and more in touch with employees’ needs.


Yet where is the balance between results-focused and people-focused? In tough moments …

Are you too nice to lead?



Are You Too Nice to Lead, Effectively?

Image by: SeanbJack via Creative Commons License.


There are team members who want, welcome, and will only work for a nice leader — until they see that the nice leader won’t address poor performance and cannot negotiate tough issues with other teams and management.

They feel unprotected and at the mercy of slacking team members and other teams. So much for leaders being nice!

When Might You Be Too Nice to Lead?


  1. With Fear of Conflict. If you tend to avoid conflict and want people to just work things out for themselves, you may be seen as too nice to lead.

    Alternative: Get a coach to help you develop your conflict resolution skills. Great leaders move past their fear. They know when to step in and even teach others how to work together.


  2. In Times of Great Change. In everyday work, your teams think of you as a very effective leader. Then the organization announces a major change and you must lead your teams through it. The tension rises and your teams resist. In this moment of truth, do you lead them forward? If you cave in to their objections and resistance, your boss may see you as too nice to lead.

    Alternative: Have the courage to draw on the good will you have with your team. Show them you believe in them and in the change. If you don’t believe it, why should they?


  3. When You Require Emotional Support. Being humble and less directive can be good for your team as respects and taps their talent and commitment. Showing no confidence and needing constant emotional support can scare the bejeebers out of them and earn you the label of too nice or weak to lead.

    Alternative: Learn and understand the interplay between being confident and being humble. Confidence is strength for your team. Humbleness opens the door to growth. Both are valuable leadership traits. Lack of confidence isn’t.


  4. If You Must Be Liked. Needing to be liked can steer you to many poor leadership behaviors. It can drive you to sacrifice results for the virtual hug. This can earn you the label of too nice to lead.

    Alternative: Be like-able without seeking to be liked.


  5. When You Get Promoted. Picture yourself leading your former peers and even being a peer of your former boss. Guilt or feelings of unworthiness can make you seem timid or too solicitous. This can earn you the label of too nice to lead.

    Alternative: Your boss or another leader put their faith in you. You were promoted for a reason. The team you lead needs your courage and talent. Even if some team members grouse in jealousy, the team’s success depends on your willingness to do the job. Embrace the responsibility you were given; don’t trigger the decision maker’s doubt and regret. Believe in yourself, the purpose, and the team. Lead.


  6. If You Own Their Behavior. When you mistakenly believe that you are responsible for a team member’s behavior, you are at risk of giving an errant employee too many chances. You may take their behavior as your failure. If you are coaching one of your team members and they are not making progress, would you be able to tell them they are no longer on the team? If not, you may earn the label of too nice to lead.

    Alternative: Afford your team members the adult responsibility of owning their own behavior. Coach, teach, guide, and lead them. But let them own their own behavior!


  7. When Your Career is Paramount. When you care about your career growth more than the current position, you may inappropriately say yes to other teams or management requests. You are busy pleasing everyone else and your current team’s success may suffer. If you are lucky, this may earn you the label of too nice to lead. If you are not lucky, it may earn you a different label that isn’t fit for print. Either way, it’s not what a great leader does.

    Alternative: Let current successes, appropriate interactions, and great negotiation pave your career path.




As the definition of leadership has shifted from rough directive behavior to engaging employees, some leaders veer off course and focus only on happiness.


Rediscover the balance and you foster success for all!













You can be liked and fail as a leader; you can be disliked and fail as a leader.

Seek and practice balance and you will succeed!


From professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2011-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.

Related Posts:
Leadership: Can You Be Friends With Those You Lead? Yes If …
6 Steps to Lead With Honesty & Civility
10 Ways to Ignite Greatness Without Leaving Scars


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Customer Effort: Does Your Invoice Ruin the Customer Experience?


If your gut reaction to this question is, of course, pause for a moment. I’m not speaking about customers wishing your product/service was free or less expensive. This story is about an alarming trend of companies sending out confusing bills.


Customer Effort: Image is a confusing list of numbers.

Customer Effort: Paying the Bill Should Be Easy Not Confusing! Image by Eliazar Parra Cardenas via Flickr.

Image by Eliazar Parra Cardenas via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Customer Effort: Punctuate a Great Experience With an Easy Bill

The Story
I damaged a tire on my brand new car. It was a side puncture so the tire did not go flat. Yet I suspected I would need a new tire.

I called a place I had bought tires before. Mike was very nice. He asked me what type of tire and asked me to come in and he would look at it. When I arrived Mike wasn’t there yet Dave knew about it and told me they ordered my type of tire just in case I needed it — which I did.

This was a great customer experience. They were proactive and helpful. They even said they could do it in time for me to leave for my next appointment and they did it. THEN suddenly the experience soured. I looked at the bill. There were multiple columns of numbers and fees for extra services I had turned down. I said to Dave, “Why is this so complicated? I have bachelor’s degree in Mathematics and I can’t even understand this bill.”



Dave tried to explain the bill yet you could see he was struggling to make it clear. I expected three numbers in a straight column — the cost of the tire, labor and service charges, and sales tax — that would add up to the total.


Customer Effort: Other Difficult Examples

  • Telephone bills with unrecognizable taxes strewn over multiple pages. How much customer effort does it take to understand a telephone bill?
  • Hotel bills that display as double entry accounting — how many customers understand double entry accounting? Extra customer effort to understand a hotel bill leaves a bad lasting memory.
  • Banking statements with transactions in the order of when they cleared — most people write their check ledger in check#/date order. Why do banks ask customers to extend this extra customer effort just to balance their checkbooks? Make it easy!



Confusing bills are such an unnecessary ding against a wonderful customer experience. Don’t mar the great customer service experience you give with a confusing invoice. Raising doubt and mistrust at the moment you’re asking for money is risky and foolish!


Customer Effort Tip



Invoice — should be “in” the customer’s “voice”, — not yours!



You’ll get paid more easily with fewer questions.



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Business Leadership: Who Are Your Customers’ Advocates? You?
Create a Generous Customer Experience Vibe – It’s Irresistible!

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Leadership and Friendship: Is it possible?

WHEN/WHERE: Join us and share your view Sunday June 29, 2014 in Twitter chat at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



Leadership and Friendship: Possible? Tricky? Easy?

Leadership and friendship has been labelled a touchy subject for a long time. Some claim it shouldn’t be a goal. Others say it is ill-advised. Still others say it is the key to employee engagement and deep commitment.

We take on this highly charged topic in our upcoming global Twitter #Peopleskills chat June 29th 10am EDT.


Leadership and Friendship: Image is People skills logo

Leadership and Friendship. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Leadership and Friendship: Would you like it?

I recently wrote a blog post on the leadership and friendship quandary and the comments were quite diverse. I even received private emails about the risks and public remarks about the benefits. From that I realized it would be a very interesting and valuable topic for our people skills community!

I am so looking forward to hearing your views. Some questions to get us thinking in advance:

  • How do you define friendship?
  • How do you define the essentials of leadership?
  • Where is the overlap between leadership and friendship?
  • Why is there such concern and even distress about combining leadership and friendship?
  • Would you want to be friends with your leader? Why/why not?
  • What could leaders and teams achieve or lose if they were friends? Pls. explain.
  • What are some of the specific difficulties of combining leadership and friendship?
  • When you get promoted to lead your former teammates, can you be friends too? Why/why not?
  • How do culture and generational differences play into this issue if at all?
  • How would people skills help/hinder leadership and friendship?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.



So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community on Sunday June 29, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your creative views and experience in our people skills chat on leadership and friendship.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to the community chat moderators who generously donate their time week after week: Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday June 29, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on leadership and friendship.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.






TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. June 29, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Twitter Chat to explore leadership and friendship.

Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Many leaders assert that passion is essential to leadership success. If they aren’t passionate, how will employees be inspired to the vision?


As I work with leaders, I pose a key question about that passion.



As you inspire teams with the fire of your passion, do you scar them or ignite their greatness?
 


Let Your Passion Ignite Greatness Without Leaving Scars. Image by: fsamuels via Flickr Creative Commons License.



Passion that burns others undermines the goal.

Passion that ignites others fuels success.

 

Leadership: 10 Ways to Ignite Greatness Without Leaving Scars


  1. Keep your mind open. Leaders, when your mind is open to different ways of reaching the end goal, your passion ignites team ideas and greatness. If you close your mind, you scar team spirit and douse passion.

  2. Establish the limits of freedom. That might seem like an oxymoron yet it is true. If there are boundaries, state them and then let innovation, creativity, and great talent surface and develop. If you pretend there are no boundaries and inflict them later, you scar team rhythm and trust. When boundaries legitimately change, communicate them clearly.

  3. Become a geyser of goodwill. The more times you genuinely communicate the positives, the more trust and goodwill you build with the team. This goodwill builds team strength to hear the negatives with objectivity. The sum ignites greatness.

  4. Be honest not blunt. Honesty that doesn’t insult catapults all to greatness. Bluntness leaves emotional scars that toughen future interactions. Classic wisdom says: Attack the idea not the I. I add, “Disagree without being disagreeable.”

  5. Question before feedback. Your passion for the vision or goal, will scar others if you give negative feedback before understanding their actions. You also scar your credibility and their trust in you.

  6. Refine your message to critical points. Passion has the power to confuse. It causes you to leave out critical information that can ignite the team’s greatness. Exercise: Write your message as a headline and then the bullet points to support it. Ask yourself, is it clear? Clear communication focuses the fire and ignites the team’s greatness.

  7. Show you are listening. Ever work for leaders who are so passionate that they keep blazing new trails without showing you they heard your ideas and concerns? Don’t be a leader who appears deaf. Listen. Dialogue ignites greatness.

  8. See talent in mistakes. Team greatness is harnessed through individual contributions to the same goal. Differences in talent and perspective often produce unexpected outcomes that you might see as mistakes. Can you also see the talent in unexpected outcomes?

  9. Recognize initiative and celebrate learning. One uncomfortable truth about igniting greatness is that not all team members want to be great. Some leaders and managers address this discrepancy by sacrificing greatness in the quest for team harmony. There’s a better way. If you recognize those who are showing initiative and greatness AND celebrate all who are learning, you preserve team harmony without sacrificing greatness.

  10. What is your #10?



Leaders, what else are you doing to ignite greatness without leaving scars?



From my experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2011-2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

People Skills Spring Cleaning – JOIN Us to Polish ‘Em Up!

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday June 15, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



People Skills Spring Cleaning

Keeping our people skills fresh and alive keeps our relationships sparkling with energy. Whether it’s at work or at home, we maintain great interactions when we regularly clean up our attitudes and behaviors with others.



People Skills Spring Cleaning. Image is People skills logo

People Skills Spring Cleaning. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

People Skills Spring Cleaning – Refresh Your Spirit!

Let’s dust off the cob webs and chase away the dust bunnies from our people skills. As we meet new people and face new situations with existing connections, our polished up people skills impress and foster great interactions.


Some questions to get us thinking in advance:

  • What people skills have you recently polished up?
  • How does it help to do a people skills spring cleaning checkup on your annual goals?
  • When has a leader’s people skills spring cleaning helped you?
  • Which leadership people skills should we keep polished? Why?
  • How have people skills helped you create a clean slate?
  • What dust bunnies of old ideas about people should we sweep away from our lives?
  • How can we find the cobwebs that trap our people skills in the past?
  • What events have spurred you to clean up your people skills?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.

So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community on Sunday June 15, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your creative views and experience in our people skills spring cleaning.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to to the community and chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday June 15, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience in our first people skills spring cleaning.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. June 15, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Chat on Twitter as we do our first people skills spring cleaning.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Leadership Quandary: Are friendship and leadership compatible?

 

Leadership Quandary: Image is circle of humans holding hands.

Leadership Quandary: Can You Be Friends w/ Those You Lead? Image licensed from Istockphoto.com.

Image licensed from Istock.com.

For years the answer to this question was no. Leadership training programs cautioned against it.

Even today, many leaders believe that it isn’t wise or even possible. I recently read this in an article on the isolation of leadership. I read another that said friends gossip about the boss so leaders and employees can’t be friends.


Yet, many leaders found in hindsight the answer to this leadership quandary had changed from no to yes. They didn’t plan friendship. They didn’t have it as a goal. They found over time they had become friends with those they lead.


Leadership Quandary: Are friendship and leadership compatible?

Yes if …

  • Leaders earn the employees’ respect through honesty and integrity not fear. When leaders lead through hierarchy and commands, friendship is not likely. Distance, fear, blame, and punishment are the vibe. Conversely if you lead through integrity, engagement, and the respect it earns you, friendship is very possible.

  • Everyone defines friendship the same way. Mature friendships go far beyond just make me feel good and have better things to do than gossip. They are based in mutual support, frank conversations, and subsisting together. They evolve. The leadership quandary over friendship fades as leaders and team members become pillars for each other.

  • Leaders see themselves as servants to the teams. Servant leadership may be the easiest example of how leadership and friendship can co-exist. Servant leaders don’t see themselves as judges. The leadership quandary never confuses them. They lead as a guide, a teacher, a resource, a voice of truth. All traits of a good friend.






Resolving the Leadership Quandary: Friendship & Leadership


  1. Let it evolve. If it’s meant to be it will happen. Don’t declare it. Don’t block it.

  2. As the opportunity arises, discuss what friendship is. What will you do when personal needs and organizational needs conflict? Will friendship be a help or a hindrance?

    There are many generations in the workplace with different views. These conversations can be valuable in building positive interactions even if they don’t produce friendships.





  3. Honor the challenges of transition. If you are the new leader, declaring you are a friend may seem fake. It doesn’t happen in a second. It grows and evolves through actions and interactions. Declaring it can also seem presumptuous, pushy, and insensitive. Team members may feel disappointed that the former leader is gone. Declaring your friendship may be its very death knell.

  4. Determine how to lead your former teammates. One of the toughest challenges of leadership and friendship comes when leading your former teammates. With very mature friendships, the transition can be quite easy. Other times, everyone struggles while adjusting to new roles. Be open. Discuss expectations. Discuss friendship. From this openness you will know how to lead well in your new role. Friendships may re-emerge through the struggle.

  5. Take steps to actively include new teammates/employees. If you have strong friendship with those you’ve been leading, new team members can often feel left out. They often imagine and fear the worst. They might wonder if there is favoritism because of the closeness they see among you.

    You needn’t stop being friends with long time employees. Reach out to new team members and help them feel a part of the team. Have lunch with them or SKYPE with them. Get to know them and give them a chance to get to know you. Respect the evolution of these relationships.


  6. Accept if employees don’t want friendship with you. Some feel uncomfortable with it. They feel more secure separating leadership and friendship.






There are many advantages to letting friendship evolve between you and those you lead. Mature bonds of friendship sustain everyone through difficult times. Friendship’s warmth sustains morale. Friendship’s eyes see and prevent disasters. Friendship feels good and makes work enjoyable.

Leadership Quandary: Image says Don't fear it. Discuss it.

Leadership Quandary: Leaders and team members as friends?





What other risks, challenges, or benefits should we consider?


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership Sincerity: Are You Leading w/ Honesty & Civility?
Leadership: Breed Accountability Not Blame
5 Steps to Develop Emotional Intelligence
Leadership, Are You a Boring Tiresome Leader?

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Flexibility in Life: Our People Skills Chat Topic for Sunday, June 8th.

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday June 8, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



Flexibility in Life

Flexibility in life is a topic that arouses many emotions. Some claim it is the secret to happiness and success. Others say it’s disingenuous and inauthentic.

The answer may be in the balance or perhaps in individual choice. Guest hosting this chat on flexibility in life during my absence this week is people skills community moderator Chantal Bechervaise. Chantal’s personal story is a living example of flexibility and possibilities.



Flexibility in Life. Image is People skills logo

Flexibility in Life. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Flexibility in Life: Why, When, How, or Why Not?

Flexibility and change are often seen as the key to survival. The tree that can bend without breaking survives. Adapting and changing doesn’t mean weakness — in fact, it may require and demonstrate tremendous strength.


The measure of intelligence is the ability to change. ~Albert Einstein



So can flexibility in life also bring happiness?



Some questions to get us thinking in advance:

  • What does flexibility in life mean to you? Struggle, Ease, Learning?
  • Flexibility is better than predictability! ~Evinda Lepins Agree/Disagree?
  • How are creativity and flexibility are connected, if at all?
  • Where does flexibility with others take you?
  • Does flexibility in life save you time or cost you time?
  • What people skills empower flexibility?
  • How does flexibility fit into work and personal life?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.

So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community and guest host @CBechervaise, on Sunday June 8, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your personal experiences and insights on resilience in adversity.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to to the community and chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday June 8, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on flexibility in life.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. June 8, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Chat on Twitter as we discuss flexibility in life.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Simple Integrity: People Skills Influence


Simple Integrity: Image is Happy Emotion & Sad Emotion

Simple Integrity: Single Best Step We Can Take. Image by Andras Pfaff via Flickr.

Image by Andras Pfaff via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Simple integrity is the moment of truth in personal and professional relationships. Although integrity can seem complex, there is one basic step we can take to show simple integrity with others.




Simple Integrity: Which would you prefer?

Answer this question: When you feel wronged by someone what would you prefer to hear from them?


“You really feel betrayed by me.”



OR



“Clearly, I’ve let you down. I’m sorry.”




When we take ownership of how we’ve affected others, we affect others in a positive way. Our empathy with how they’re feeling now — minimizes the pain of what we did before. Neutrality would intensify their pain.


The best single step we can take for simple integrity is to show ownership not neutrality.









Question: Taking ownership makes others feel great. How does it make you feel?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership: Fairness is Not Neutrality
Potent Communication: 9 People Skills Tips That Make It Easy

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Accountability Legacy: The People Skills Joys Behind the Heavy Load

When you hear the word, accountability, do you picture something negative or positive? Burdensome or uplifting? Many people see it as a heavy load. Yet there are many perks to being accountable.

In fact, developing your accountability legacy brings you opportunities and joys beyond anything you’ve imagined. 


Accountability Legacy: Image is network of connections.

Accountability Legacy: People Skills Secrets Revealed. Image licensed from Istock.com

Image licensed from Istock.com.

Accountability Legacy: People Skills Secrets Revealed

Did you ever think of accountability as part of people skills? It is and your accountability legacy brings these secret perks.

  1. Trust. Accountability is a trust magnet. That’s why trust tops our list of accountability’s perks. Accountability’s integrity draws people to you. Do not fear that people will dump their responsibilities on you. Accountability doesn’t make you a doormat. Accountability makes you worthy of trust.

  2. Real charisma. Accountability is the proof that charisma is not a scam or manipulation. It shows there’s no hidden agenda. It underscores that your charisma is real. You become known as the “real thing” — gold in business and in life.




  3. Respect. Your accountability respects others and earns you their respect in return.  Your actions honor your promises to them. What you do respects their needs and uplifts them. This brings you respect, gratitude, and loyalty.

  4. Reliability. Your accountability broadcasts reliability far and wide. Who doesn’t value that?  Who doesn’t want someone they can count on? Reliability makes you a desired friend and partner. It opens doors for you in business that your lack of experience would otherwise keep closed. It connects you with people you would not otherwise meet.  Reliability creates your image of being strong and caring. Don’t buy into the myth that reliability is boring. You can be reliable and spontaneous. They’re not opposites.




  5. Confidence. Accountability shows confidence and people love to be around it.  You don’t shrink from challenges or responsibility and you inspire others.  Your accountability legacy of gracious self-confidence is a powerful connective force.

  6. Safety. Interaction can be scary.  Your accountability replaces others’ anxiety with safety. You don’t dump on others; you take ownership of what you say and do.  They call you a “good egg” because you don’t blame them for your interaction missteps. You don’t attack; you account for your own behavior. Your accountability legacy of safety gives you a wonderful reputation. The possibilities from this are infinite.

  7. Simplicity.  Ah the joy of dealing with someone who makes life easy and simple.  Ownership instead of defensiveness.  Learning instead of hiding. Success instead of detours. Now think of the doors that will open for you with that accountability legacy!






Accountability makes you … easy to trust, sincere to believe, authentic to confide in, safe to approach, reliable to work with, and effortless to be around.

  • Add that to your resume.
  • Show that in an interview.
  • Market that to your customers.
  • Model that with your employees.
  • Mentor that with new leaders.
  • Share that with your family.
  • Teach that to children.
  • Reinforce that with teens.
  • Live that every day.






How has accountability truly helped you in your life and work?

Tell us your story, please.



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership: Breed Accountability Not Blame
Leaders, Convert Blame to Accountability Part II
5 Psychologically Uncomfortable Career Shaping Opportunities

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Listening Lapses: Lessons From Laughable Moments


As The People Skills Coach™, I love learning about people through real-time interactions. It’s especially interesting when the listening lapses are funny or absurd.


Laughable Listening Lapses: Image is a comical character made with marshmallows.

Listening Lapses: 3 Laughable Learning Moments.

Image licensed from Istock.com.

Listening Lapses: Laughable Learning Moments

  1. Fast food fandango.

    I pulled into a fast food drive through. I wasn’t familiar with the chain so I asked: Do you have a green salad w/ grilled chicken on it? The young man replied: We don’t have any Greek salads. Realizing the transmission error, I said: No no, not Greekgreen. You know, lettuce. He then replied: Well ma’am, all our salads have lettuce.

    Lesson Learned: Expecting others to understand what we see as common sense is just as absurd as the listening lapse itself.


  2. Quibbling questions.

    The gate agent called pre-boarding for priority customers. She asked that everyone else stay seated.

    As we stood in line, a passenger who just arrived in the gate area asked the woman behind me if she was in priority. The woman snapped back: Yes, I can follow directions. The stunned traveler just stared at the woman. Then another recently arrived passenger asked the stunned traveler, is this the priority boarding line? The stunned traveler replied: Yes it is. Just don’t ask her, she’ll bite your head off!

    Lesson Learned: When something seems odd or absurd, assume positive intent. The positive is just as likely as the negative and it prevents embarrassment. Moreover, it can even turn a negative moment into a positive one!


  3. Messages that transcend words.

    My friend and I were preparing a Latin dance showcase with our two teachers who were from Eastern Europe. When my friend explained to them they were playing the part of two hot guys, they looked puzzled. We weren’t connecting. The teachers conferred with each other in their native language and then said to us: “Oh, like Chip and Dish Dancers!”

    Lesson Learned: Language doesn’t have to be a barrier to communication. Where there’s a will, there’s a way. Use whatever you know to get you there!





Listening lapses and interaction miss-hits can frustrate us or teach us. If we can find the humor in them, we strengthen our people skills and live a happier life.



Your Turn!

What humorous interactions have you had and what did you learn?



Last tip, if you can’t find the humor in frustrating moments, try these pleasures that calm when dealing with toxic people.


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Responding to Negativity: Our People Skills Chat Topic for Sunday, May 18th

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday May 18, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



Responding to Negativity: How Do You Do It?

Responding to negativity can be difficult depending on the circumstances. In our personal lives we may feel free to speak one way. In our professional lives, we may feel more constrained. Then there is the question of the effect on our outlook and daily morale.

We take up this topic in our people skills global Twitter chat this Sunday. Many thanks to Dave Moore, HPT-Transformation for suggesting this topic.



Responding to Negativity. Image is People skills logo

Responding to Negativity. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Responding to Negativity: Is It Really That Tough?

I have watched some people struggle terribly with this topic. I have also witnessed others who handle it easily with barely a hiccup. It is a complex issue for some and a simple response for others. So let’s explore this topic of responding to negativity and see what we can learn from each other.

Some questions to get us thinking in advance:

  • How do you define negativity? Is it a mindset or a tangible happening?
  • Are pessimism and negativity synonyms or related in any way?
  • Can someone be too positive? Do some people wonder how to respond to too much positivity?
  • Would you rather be around a very positive person or more negative? Whom do you trust more?
  • When people have differences of opinion is this automatically negative?
  • What are some effective ways to avoid getting sucked in by someone else’s negativity?
  • Responding to negativity: What do you say when a negative person asks why you stopped hanging out with them?
  • Where is the cutoff point (if at all) where you respond to negativity with negativity?
  • What are some of the most effective ways to respond to persistent negativity?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.

Ironically, responding to negativity is an essential element of positive people skills. So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join us Sunday May 18, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills).


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to to the community and chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tom Rhodes, and Tracy Shroyer.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday May 18th, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on responding to negativity.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. May 18, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Chat on Twitter as we discuss responding to negativity.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Proactive Leadership: Problem Prevention a Priority?

When we think of leadership, many of us assume it’s proactive by definition. We might even consider the phrase proactive leadership to be redundant.

At the same time, I witness many leaders who commit resources to solving problems not to preventing them. Reactive not proactive leadership. It leaves me with the nagging question: 

 

Is problem prevention a priority for leaders or is it unpopular?



Proactive Leadership: Image is flip chart paper w/ words Problem Prevention

Proactive Leadership: Is Problem Prevention Unpopular? Image by solobasssteve via Flickr.

Image by solobasssteve via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Proactive Leadership: Why Problem Prevention May Be Unpopular

I’ve asked leaders, managers, team members, and colleagues this question. They offered different theories. 


We don’t focus on problem prevention because …

  1. We don’t know the importance and impact until the problem actually appears.
  2. There are always existing problems that must take precedence over prevention.
  3. If the problem doesn’t materialize, we’ve wasted our money and resources.
  4. Problem prevention can’t be measured. There’s no baseline to know if we’ve accomplished anything.
  5. There is an infinite number of possible problems. How would we choose which to prevent?
  6. Problem prevention would increase our operating costs.
  7. My career would stagnate. Nobody gets promoted because s/he prevented problems.
  8. Before a problem appears, there is no pain to motivate action. 



This is quite a list. It communicates lack of vision, poor planning, a misguided view of metrics, job security issues, and little or no initiative without pain.  Pretty bleak picture for proactive leadership.  

Yet there are past and current precedents showing that problem prevention is a valuable and achievable priority. 

  • Years back, manufacturing found the cost savings in preventing defects through total quality management.
  • Today company’s like Zappos and Amazon proactively pay employees to quit if they aren’t happy. They believe that unhappy employees make for unsuccessful companies. Why wait for the success to slide and then address the employee motivation issue?
  • Fair hiring practices are also designed to prevent law suits.

 

So is this proactive leadership only possible in these cases of legal requirements, quality based manufacturing, and very visionary leaders? No. All organizations can focus on problem prevention.

 

 

When we look at the list of reasons why leaders don’t focus on problem prevention, there is one underlying common element — the “we don’t know” element. 

  • We don’t know which potential problems are important enough to prevent.
  • We don’t know how to show achievement.
  • We don’t know the impact or the pain.
  • We don’t know the cost.

 




The first step to problem prevention is to make the intangibles tangible.  There are research organizations that study and publish data on most workplace issues.  

    For example, you can access findings on the cost and impact of workplace violence.  Instead of simply investing in “active shooter training” which is reactive, invest as well in workplace violence prevention programs. These include training about the warning signs and conducting early interventions.  Compare the costs of these programs to the research findings and you make the unknown, known. This is proactive leadership.
    There is much data on the negative effects of employee disengagement and low morale on company productivity and success.  Use this data to decide how much to invest in employee engagement programs and additional proactive leadership training.

There is no need to let the “we don’t know element” create a reactive culture in your organization.






Solving problems takes time and money AND drains those resources away from achieving the business vision. That’s a double hit against success!



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership Intuition, Develop Yours!

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Mother’s Day People Skills Chat: Mothers, Leadership & Inner Strength

WHEN: Join us Sunday May 11, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



Mother’s Day People Skills Chat: Mothers, Leadership, Inner Strength

We often think of mothers as nurturing and warm. Yet they are also pillars of inner strength who lead little infants to develop into adults.

In honor of mothers, we will explore leadership and inner strength in a special Mother’s Day People Skills Chat Sunday May 11, 2014, 10am EDT.



Mother's Day People Skills Chat.  Image is People skills logo

Mother’s Day People Skills Chat on Mothers, Leadership, & Inner Strength. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Mother’s Day People Skills Chat: Leadership & Inner Strength

What leadership do mothers show and what have they taught about leadership with their strengths?

Some questions to get us thinking in advance:

  • What words would you use to describe the unique leadership that mothers use?
  • How do mothers combine leadership and nurturing?
  • Mothers lead to empower. Agree/Disagree?
  • Exactly how does inner strength impact mothers and their leadership?
  • When do mothers use their inner strength to help those outside their families?
  • How do mothers develop inner strength in their children?
  • What have mothers taught us about finding and developing great connections?
  • How would the world be different if more mothers were leading countries?
  • What can business leaders learn from mothers’ leadership?
  • What is your mother’s people skills legacy?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.

There is so much to explore about mothers, leadership, and inner strength! So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join us Sunday May 11, 2014, 10am EDT in Mother’s Day People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills).


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to to the community and chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tom Rhodes, and Tracy Shroyer.






Hope you will all join our special Mother’s Day People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday May 11th, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT on mothers, leadership, and inner strength.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. May 11, 2014, 10am EDT in our Mother’s Day People Skills Chat on Twitter as we discuss mothers, leadership, and inner strength.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

 

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

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