Mindset

Customers Frustrating You? Stay Professional in Unfair Moments!


Are Customers Frustrating You? Image is Speak No Evil Hand Over Mouth

Are Customers Frustrating You Onto the Ledge?

Image by Tim Samoff via Flickr Creative Commons License.


In my previous post, 5 Powerful Beliefs to Win Over Rude Angry Customers. I explained 5 ways to stay objective and caring with rude or angry customers.


One customer service representative left the following comment riddled with frustration and posed a heartfelt question. I felt what she was going through and promised I would write this post to respond.

Her Struggle

I’m having a very very difficult customer service day, and am trying to talk myself off the ledge. Specific to my current customer service issues, I am convinced that it doesn’t matter how nice you are, how much you let them vent, how much you empathize with them, how much you don’t interrupt, how much you try to help, there are just some people who you cannot make happy no matter what, and that’s what I’m dealing with right now. Frustration is a good way to describe this.

My question is: When is enough enough? When should respect be commanded? ~Wendy Y.





Are Customers Frustrating You?

Have you ever felt frustrated with customers just like Wendy? I think most of us would say yes.

  • When customers claim we didn’t tell them something when actually we did
  • When customers don’t communicate their expectations until they see the solution isn’t working
  • When customers change requirements at the last minute
  • When customers get impatient with us



Feeling frustrated is human. Wanting to finally show it is also human and very foolhardy.

  1. It won’t change the customer’s behavior.
  2. It won’t command or earn you respect. It will cost you.
  3. It won’t feel as good as you think because you will pay for this moment of revenge in future interactions or lost business.




Picture Customers Frustrating You

Picture yourself feeling frustrated with customers. What are they doing? What do you want them to do — change their behavior? Lashing out at them or giving them sarcastic slams won’t accomplish that.

If you are, as Wendy said, on the ledge and ready to lose it, write down all the reasons the customers might be acting that way. The list will be long and incomplete and there is only one way to work in this state — with a patient positive can-do attitude.

Focus on what needs to be done and do it. Simple! Deliver knowledge with care. It keeps you and the customers moving toward a solution not detouring to the land of emotional squabbles, vengeful dings, hurtful one-upsmanship.





Picture customers frustrating you and remember that customer service is not friendship. It’s not equality. It’s a professional pursuit of objective caring that allows us to be proud and happy when we show patience and restraint in frustrating unfair moments.



Customers frustrating you? Don’t make it a battle of who’s right or wrong. Use your emotional intelligence to show customers how professional, perceptive, and forbearing you are.




I look forward to helping you and your teams reach this level of happy professionalism!



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Customer Service Superstars: 11 Things They Give That Make Them Great!
Simple Integrity: Best Single Step We Can Take
Potent Communication: 9 People Skills Tips That Make It Easy

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Making Aggression Unacceptable is our people skills chat topic this Sunday.

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday July 27, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
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Making Aggression Unacceptable: Is It Possible With People Skills?

Aggression is all around us in the world right now. Politics aside, we wonder how can we make aggression unacceptable? How can we overcome the tendency for aggression and focus on productive peace?

Joining me as co-host for this discussion on making aggression unacceptable will be Dave Moore, founder of the The Moore Consortium. Dave hails from UK and reaches around the globe with his human potential transformation workshops (#HPTTransformation).


Making Aggression Unacceptable. Image is People skills logo

Making Aggression Unacceptable. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Making Aggression Unacceptable: Is It Desirable & Possible?

Dave Moore and I had several discussions as we wondered if the topic was viable and desirable for a people skills chat.

Although it took us longer than usual to formulate it, we never swayed from the importance of the topic of making aggression unacceptable. So we turn this Sunday to all the people skills chat participants to add their voice and dig deeper into this vision.

We can explore, from many aspects, making aggression unacceptable. We invite you to lend your perspective without politics to this topic that touches all of humanity. Some questions to get us thinking in advance of Sunday’s #Peopleskills Twitter chat:

  • What is your definition of aggression? Violence?
  • How does it differ from a competitive spirit?
  • Do you see life as individual existence or connectedness? Competition or collaboration?
  • How does that affect views about aggression, if at all?
  • Why do you think aggression is so common in the world today?
  • If trust doesn’t exist, is aggression inevitable?
  • What does harmony represent to you: Success, happiness, or sacrifice/loss?
  • How can we as humans bring a powerful voice of peace to everyday life?
  • Destruction/violence: What can we do in the face of it?
  • How can we make people skills the preferred choice over aggression?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.



So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join the community on Sunday July 27, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills). Share your creative views and experience in our people skills chat about making aggression unacceptable.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to this week’s co-host Dave Moore and the people skills community. Continued thanks to generous chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tracy Shroyer and Tom Rhodes for their time and contributions.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday July 27, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on making aggression unacceptable. This will not be about politics. Our focus is about humanity and peace.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.






TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. July 27, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Twitter Chat about making aggression unacceptable.

Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Responding to Negativity: Our People Skills Chat Topic for Sunday, May 18th

WHEN/WHERE: Join us Sunday May 18, 2014 on Twitter at 10AM EDT. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Time converter:
Please click the time converter link above to convert 10am EDT to your local time.



Responding to Negativity: How Do You Do It?

Responding to negativity can be difficult depending on the circumstances. In our personal lives we may feel free to speak one way. In our professional lives, we may feel more constrained. Then there is the question of the effect on our outlook and daily morale.

We take up this topic in our people skills global Twitter chat this Sunday. Many thanks to Dave Moore, HPT-Transformation for suggesting this topic.



Responding to Negativity. Image is People skills logo

Responding to Negativity. Image by KimbManson for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.

Responding to Negativity: Is It Really That Tough?

I have watched some people struggle terribly with this topic. I have also witnessed others who handle it easily with barely a hiccup. It is a complex issue for some and a simple response for others. So let’s explore this topic of responding to negativity and see what we can learn from each other.

Some questions to get us thinking in advance:

  • How do you define negativity? Is it a mindset or a tangible happening?
  • Are pessimism and negativity synonyms or related in any way?
  • Can someone be too positive? Do some people wonder how to respond to too much positivity?
  • Would you rather be around a very positive person or more negative? Whom do you trust more?
  • When people have differences of opinion is this automatically negative?
  • What are some effective ways to avoid getting sucked in by someone else’s negativity?
  • Responding to negativity: What do you say when a negative person asks why you stopped hanging out with them?
  • Where is the cutoff point (if at all) where you respond to negativity with negativity?
  • What are some of the most effective ways to respond to persistent negativity?



These are just some questions to get us thinking. Actual questions will post live during the chat.

Ironically, responding to negativity is an essential element of positive people skills. So bring your personal perspective, your experience, a beverage, and join us Sunday May 18, 2014, 10am EDT in People Skills Chat on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills).


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community, The Facebook Group People Skills That Really Matter and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your diverse insights.

Special thanks to to the community and chat moderators Chantal Bechervaise, Dave Moore, Hoda Maalouf, Tom Rhodes, and Tracy Shroyer.






Hope you will all join our People Skills Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) this Sunday May 18th, 2014, 10am EDT/7am PDT to share your insights, perspective, and experience on responding to negativity.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Tweetchat.com, or Twubs.com and enter hashtag #peopleskills. Sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Connect with you this Sun. May 18, 2014, 10am EDT in our People Skills Global Chat on Twitter as we discuss responding to negativity.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Proactive Leadership: Problem Prevention a Priority?

When we think of leadership, many of us assume it’s proactive by definition. We might even consider the phrase proactive leadership to be redundant.

At the same time, I witness many leaders who commit resources to solving problems not to preventing them. Reactive not proactive leadership. It leaves me with the nagging question: 

 

Is problem prevention a priority for leaders or is it unpopular?



Proactive Leadership: Image is flip chart paper w/ words Problem Prevention

Proactive Leadership: Is Problem Prevention Unpopular? Image by solobasssteve via Flickr.

Image by solobasssteve via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Proactive Leadership: Why Problem Prevention May Be Unpopular

I’ve asked leaders, managers, team members, and colleagues this question. They offered different theories. 


We don’t focus on problem prevention because …

  1. We don’t know the importance and impact until the problem actually appears.
  2. There are always existing problems that must take precedence over prevention.
  3. If the problem doesn’t materialize, we’ve wasted our money and resources.
  4. Problem prevention can’t be measured. There’s no baseline to know if we’ve accomplished anything.
  5. There is an infinite number of possible problems. How would we choose which to prevent?
  6. Problem prevention would increase our operating costs.
  7. My career would stagnate. Nobody gets promoted because s/he prevented problems.
  8. Before a problem appears, there is no pain to motivate action. 



This is quite a list. It communicates lack of vision, poor planning, a misguided view of metrics, job security issues, and little or no initiative without pain.  Pretty bleak picture for proactive leadership.  

Yet there are past and current precedents showing that problem prevention is a valuable and achievable priority. 

  • Years back, manufacturing found the cost savings in preventing defects through total quality management.
  • Today company’s like Zappos and Amazon proactively pay employees to quit if they aren’t happy. They believe that unhappy employees make for unsuccessful companies. Why wait for the success to slide and then address the employee motivation issue?
  • Fair hiring practices are also designed to prevent law suits.

 

So is this proactive leadership only possible in these cases of legal requirements, quality based manufacturing, and very visionary leaders? No. All organizations can focus on problem prevention.

 

 

When we look at the list of reasons why leaders don’t focus on problem prevention, there is one underlying common element — the “we don’t know” element. 

  • We don’t know which potential problems are important enough to prevent.
  • We don’t know how to show achievement.
  • We don’t know the impact or the pain.
  • We don’t know the cost.

 




The first step to problem prevention is to make the intangibles tangible.  There are research organizations that study and publish data on most workplace issues.  

    For example, you can access findings on the cost and impact of workplace violence.  Instead of simply investing in “active shooter training” which is reactive, invest as well in workplace violence prevention programs. These include training about the warning signs and conducting early interventions.  Compare the costs of these programs to the research findings and you make the unknown, known. This is proactive leadership.
    There is much data on the negative effects of employee disengagement and low morale on company productivity and success.  Use this data to decide how much to invest in employee engagement programs and additional proactive leadership training.

There is no need to let the “we don’t know element” create a reactive culture in your organization.






Solving problems takes time and money AND drains those resources away from achieving the business vision. That’s a double hit against success!



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership Intuition, Develop Yours!

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

Potent Communication: 9 People Skills Tips That Make It Easy

Highly-effective communication — aka potent communication  — distinguishes the successful from the unsuccessful.  Everyone can do it if they have the desire and the know-how.

In my keynotes, I inspire the desire. Here in this blog post, I offer some of the know-how.  Add your potent communication tips in the comments section below and I will feature you and your tip in our online people skills community! 

 

Potent Communication: Image are many speach bubbles.

Potent Communication: 9 Easy People Skills Tips. Image fr Istock.com.

Image licensed from Istock.com

Potent Communication: 9 Easy People Skills Tips

  1. Speak positively vs. negatively.  The hundreds and hundreds of things you say every day in the negative, you could say in the positive. For example, “I didn’t know you needed that” sounds defensive and weak. Replace it with, “I see what you need and …” for a more potent communication. With this #1 change, you change your image from passive to active, from indifferent to caring.

  2. Speak forward not back. If you say to your employee, “I would have preferred the results in summary format, you sound critical and hard to please. Replace it with, “I would like the results in summary format for this time and in the future.” This is potent communication. It’s clear, accountable, and doesn’t insinuate blame.

  3. State opinion as opinion not as fact. In situations where you don’t trust someone, it’s tempting to say “You are trying to …”. Yet this communication is headed for a dead end. They will reply “no I’m not” and you are stuck going nowhere. For more potent communication, state your intentions but ask others’ theirs: “Where are you headed with this? What’s your goal?” Now it’s their turn. You will find out if they are worthy of your trust without being trapped in a yes/no game.

  4. Observe and listen for cues on how others want to interact. If someone is not comfortable with direct eye contact, using a lot of it with them will seem boorish and domineering. If someone is speaking with lots of energy and stories and you reply with loads of dry details, you won’t connect with them. It may sound ironic, yet adapting your communication style to others is one of the most potent communication skills you can ever use.

  5. Don’t let formality stop the connection. Formality has its place. There are times all communication will be formal. That’s OK. Yet if you call someone Ms. Hillard and she replies, “you can call me Ellen”, then call her Ellen. If you continue to call her Ms. Hillard, you are sending the message that you want distance between you. I’ve seen many people make this mistake thinking that they are affording continued respect. Yet Ms. Hillard has already expressed her preference. Treat her how she wants to be treated. That’s potent!

  6. In stressful moments, choose unemotional words. If you don’t want to have to eat your words later, choose neutral or unemotional words when you are under stress. To do this, take a short pause to give yourself time to find words that don’t attack others. “You stupid idiot, you banged into my car” will most likely elicit a return attack on you. Instead, leave off the “you stupid idiot” phrase and simply point out that the other person hit your car. Your communication is far more potent when you state the simple truth and suggest the next step.

  7. In negative situations, avoid the phrase “because you”. I witnessed a leader storm into a meeting and bark at his direct report, “I don’t want to have to lay people off because you don’t know how to budget correctly.” His oafish attack made him look like a weak leader. Consider how better it would be to say: “I am really concerned about having to lay people off and definitely don’t want to do it because of inaccurate budget numbers. Please make sure the numbers are correct.” Wow. Now the leader sounds clear, focused and very interested in both people and the organization’s success.

  8. Show respect. It’s far more potent than disdain. It’s becoming trendy today to use disdainful words under the guise of being authentic. These words make for provocative shocking sound bites and headlines, yet the shock effect leaves scars when you use them on people. And it’s such an unnecessary misstep. Authenticity and civility are not enemies. You can do both at the same time.

    “Stop whining” is one of those horribly offensive phrases that people are using on others quite frequently. This demeaning term patronizes others by insinuating that they are being petulant. But whoever says it is being petulant as well. “Stop whining” it is itself a whine to silence others! While you may succeed in silencing them right now, you will pay the price for a very long time. People are not puppets on a string. The next time you want them to speak up, they may give you the silent treatment. The phrase “stop whining” is not a synonym for “stop complaining”. Whining is far more disdainful.

  9. Instead of using disrespectful labels, simply describe the behavior and ask the person to stop. “I hear you saying again that you don’t like what’s happening. It’s not something that we can change right now, so I ask you not to mention it again.” Or if you think it can change, ask them for their suggested solutions. “What would you like to see as a solution?” If they continue, simply let them know you are not going to discuss it further. It is direct yet not disrespectful.


  10. Be open yet still circumspect. I call this optimistic realism. When communicating with others, be open to their views without blindly believing everything they say. Being open helps you ask great questions. The answers you get tell you whether or not to trust at that moment. If you are closed off in mistrust from the start, you have little chance of uncovering anything new. Being open is part of potent communication because it gets others to open up.



How do you develop the desire to hone your potent communication skills? Become very aware of the responses you get when you aren’t using potent communication. Do you want different responses from others? What reaction/responses do you want from them? If you are a list maker, write down what you want. If you are a creative type, picture the interaction you want. Then re-read these 9 tips and go for it!


What tips will you add to the list above from your personal experience?


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Avoid 8 Common Causes of People Skills Mistakes
The Secret Motivation Within Every Great Communicator
12 Most Beneficial People Skills to Use When You Have No Power

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

People Skills Missteps: Not so friendly, friendly advice.


If someone said to you, “I want to offer you some friendly advice”, would your gut reaction to that statement be positive or negative? Friendly advice? What would you expect to hear? Compliments?



The phrase friendly advice is fraught with people skills missteps and peril.




It’s actually a rather aggressive statement disguised as help. It sets the other person up to hear your unsolicited view or appear resistant and closed off. You can end up looking presumptuous, patronizing, or even domineering.


People Skills Missteps: Image is small pumpkin leaning on large pumpkin

People Skills Missteps of Friendly Advice Image by Sea Turtle via Flickr Creative Commons License.

Image by Sea Turtle via Flickr Creative Commons License.

People Skills Missteps: Who is it you are protecting?

Before you make this unnecessary gaffe, think about why you are labelling it friendly advice. Why not just “advice?”

Is it because …

  • you are unsure if they want your advice?
  • you may be overstepping someone’s personal boundary?
  • you are about to say something negative?
  • you want to prevent a negative reaction to what you say?



You can avoid people skills missteps like this by first assessing your intent and view. Considering the advice you are about to give:

  1. How fully do you understand the other person, their goals, philosophy, and mindset?
  2. How often do you use the phrase friendly advice? Frequently? What do you think it says about you?
  3. Are you projecting your values on others and robbing them of their self-expression?
  4. Are you trying to create a clone of yourself?


Avoiding People Skills Missteps: Stay Objective!
Know yourself! Self-awareness and respect for others are powerfully positive tools in preventing people skills missteps.

If you are …

    Highly structured, your friendly advice may skew people that way.
    Free spirited, you may tell people to loosen up.
    Very driven, you may find yourself nudging people to drive harder.



Staying Objective: Before you give advice, practice what you are going to say. Remove the phrase “friendly advice” and say to yourself what you would to say to others. Without the psychological cushion of the phrase “friendly advice”, how does the advice sound to you? Will you appear helpful or presumptuous? Open-minded or domineering?

After that if you are sure you still want to offer your view, omit the phrase friendly advice. Try “here’s my view …” or “here’s how I see it.” It shows ownership of your perspective and respects others’ views.



It’s human to want others to be just like us. Yet this fundamental urge does far more harm than good. Even if someone has asked for advice before, assuming they always want advice is definitely one of the big people skills missteps.


Think of if this way, if we know someone very well and have been their friend for a long time, we don’t need to use the phrase friendly advice. And if we aren’t that close, giving unsolicited advice can tarnish our unique views and talents with presumption.


Question:

How can we warn someone of potential trouble without presuming or patronizing?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

More People Skills Posts:
Avoid 8 Common Causes of People Skills Mistakes
Pleasures That Calm When Dealing With Toxic People

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

People Skills Lessons Learned: Experience From People Skills Community Members!


People Skills Lessons Learned: Image is fireworks.

People Skills Lessons Learned: Community Festival. Image by Marcio Cabral de Moura

Image by Marcio Cabral de Moura via Flickr Creative Commons License.


There are three ways to learn great people skills.

  • Interact with people and get their reactions and feedback. These become your people skills lessons learned.
  • Learn from experts who combine their own people skills lessons learned with lots of research and assessment of human interaction.
  • Ask others about their people skills lessons learned and hear their insights.

As The People Skills Coach™, I do all three! And I am honored to have in the people skills online community many who also believe in continuous learning. We share our experiences every Sunday in #Peopleskills Twitter chat. We also discuss people skills in our Google+ community, our LinkedIn Group, and our newest venue on Facebook. Join us!

There’s more. Some community members have now blogged their people skills lessons learned in this first ever people skills community festival. So you can also engage here in the comments section and on their individual blogs.

People Skills Lessons Learned: Read, Ponder, Share, Discuss

From personal perspectives to business insights, these blog posts show the generosity and insight of these people skills community members. I am grateful for their people skills lessons learned and their contributions. A special thank you to Karin Hurt. Her Lets Grow Leaders festivals were the inspiration for this festival.



What happens when you work in a place that is toxic or dysfunctional? How can you sustain yourself day by day? This is how I learned to sustain myself. ~Chantal Bechervaise

    How I Found the Strength to Sustain Myself From: @CBechervaise



Squeaky wheels do not always get greased … well, maybe they do, but not like you think. A little questioning of a real well-known phrase. ~John E. Smith

    Squeak At Your Own Risk From: @Stratlearner



This post emphasizes the importance of patience in a relationship and life in general. I won’t say more, be patient, read my post & enjoy it! ~Hoda Maalouf

    You Can’t Hurry Love—No, You’ll Just Have to Wait From: @MaaHoda



Attitude is the difference that makes the difference. ~Dave Moore

    Attitude is the Difference From: @Mooreconsortium



When faced with a tough decision, it’s hard to know if you’re running away from something or toward something else. A powerful story of choices and reasons. ~Karin Hurt

    When Running Away is Running Towards From: @LetsGrowLeaders



As a child I heard a lot of old sayings but really didn’t understand most of them. As I grew old I began to understand and find wisdom in them. ~Gloria Wilson

    Keys to Change > Sportsmanship – From the Ball Field to the Board Room. From: @GrandmaOnDeck



As leaders, we need to support the “kore” virtues for humanity by expressing and embracing them openly, living and teaching them. ~Cheri Essner

    Weaving Your Values Into Your Leadership From: @CheriEssner



Be positive . . . A positive attitude can improve your health, enhance your relationships, increase your chances of success, and add years to your life. ~Frank Sonnenberg

    The Power of a Positive Attitude From: @FSonnenberg



Do you want to be successful in doing business globally with others? Do you want to build lasting relationships? Then understand why learning Chinese business etiquette will be important, but not enough. ~Aad Boot

    Cross-Cultural Leadership: Why Learning Chinese Business Etiquette is Not Enough From: @LeadershipWatch



Marketing professionals learn about the needs of their target audiences by asking questions about them. Managers can do the same to understand what matters to their critically important audience: their employees! ~Al Gonzalez

    Hearts and Minds: The Key to Employee Engagement From: @AlGonzalezInfo



Leaders understand that people matter and earn great results by caring and bringing out the best in their people. ~Tom Rhodes

    Lead Through Caring From: @TomJ_Rhodes



Our attitudes and beliefs impact our people skills. What beliefs feed yours? Here’s an eight point checklist that helps me personally and professionally.

    8 Common Causes of People Skills Mistakes ~@KateNasser






What people skills lessons learned will you offer in the comments section below? Engage with us!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

 

 

PS-EnergyBar-LogoJoin me through these social channels

Engage in people skills learning! Let’s turn interaction obstacles into business success in leadership, teamwork, and customer service experience. I invite your questions, share my experience, and welcome your wisdom.

People Skills Global Chat on Twitter TOPIC: Are You Constructive or Constrictive?

WHEN: Sunday Feb. 2 2014 at 10AM ET. Hashtag: #peopleskills


Here’s a time converter to assist all of you around the globe in converting 10am ET to your local time.

Background on This Chat Topic: Constructive or Constrictive?

One day, Dave Moore of The Moore Consortium and creator of human potential technology mentioned the difference between being constructive vs. constrictive. I knew it was a worthwhile to explore it in our people skills global chat on Twitter. So Dave has agreed to co-host this topic with me Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014.


People Skills Global Chat Logo

People Skills Global Chat on Twitter Feb 2, 2014 TOPIC: Are You Constructive or Constrictive?

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Join People Skills Global Chat: Constructive vs. Constrictive?

Even when we think we are being positive, are there times when we constrict ourselves or others? As we interact with more and more people we don’t know, it is possible they may see our actions as constrictive rather than constructive!

Some questions that come to mind …

  • Have you ever felt constricted by your own thoughts or outside factors? Why?
  • How will we know if we are being constructive or constrictive?
  • When are we most likely to be constrictive with ourselves or others?
  • What gets in the way of being constructive?
  • How do you feel when people expect you to be constructive?
  • How can leaders lead within constraints without being constrictive?
  • Is there truly a way to live totally constructive?



These are just some questions to get us thinking before we begin the people skills chat this Sunday. Actual questions will post live during the chat.

So bring your personal perspective, your favorite beverage, and join me, Dave Moore, and the people skills global chat community this Sunday Feb. 2, 2014 on Twitter (hashtag: #peopleskills) to explore Are You Constructive or Constrictive?


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

Thank you Dave Moore @mooreconsortium on Twitter for suggesting and co-hosting this interesting topic.

My gratitude to all who participate and grow the people skills global chat community on Twitter (#peopleskills), Google+, and LinkedIn. We welcome your suggestions for topics, offers to co-host, and most especially your individual insights.






Hope you will all join People Skills Global Chat on Twitter #peopleskills this Sunday Feb. 2, 2014 10am ET/7am PT to explore Being Constructive vs. Constrictive.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Global Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Twubs.com or Tweetchat.com, enter hashtag #peopleskills, and sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Chat with you this Sun. Feb. 2, 2014 in People Skills Global Chat on Twitter (#peopleskills) TOPIC: Are You Constructive or Constrictive?


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results. Kate also invites you to connect with her on Google+, LinkedIn, and Twitter. She welcomes your interaction!

Conflict Resolution: You Can Stay Calm in Conflict.


As The People Skills Coach™, I am often asked for conflict resolution tips. Most especially — how to stay calm in the midst of verbal conflict.


Although taking a break can be very helpful, sometimes after the break the calm evaporates and the conflict remains. Then what?


There are also times at work when you can’t take a break. Customer service agents, sales account reps, team members working to solve a crisis are often under fixed time demands. How can they stay calm and work toward conflict resolution?

 

Conflict Resolution: Image is the word Rejuvenate.

Conflict Resolution: How to Stay Calm? Image by SweetDreamzDesign via Flickr.

Image by SweetDreamzDesign via Flickr Creative Commons License.

 

Staying Calm for Conflict Resolution

If you find yourself getting anxious in the midst of verbal conflict, these 3 steps will help you.

  1. Hear the fear and need vs. the anger and biting accusation. Behind other people’s anger and accusations, there is always a fear and/or need. Let your mind focus on finding the real issue. Hear other people’s fear to get out of fight/flight mode and into conflict resolution.
  2. When I first hear other people’s anger, I quietly ask myself …

    • Where is their fear or pain? How can I resolve this?
    • Is it that they’ve lost trust?
    • Do they believe worse things are going to follow?
    • Are they under pressure to please someone else?


  3. Know and believe your excellence is in the resolution. Other people’s anger tells your ego you are inferior. You tense up to defend it. The fact is you are not inferior. In truth, your excellence is in your ability to work it out!

  4. Learn more about your natural conflict resolution style. Self-awareness develops the mind’s ability to filter emotion. Knowing your conflict resolution style highlights the triggers you need to manage in order to stay calm. Take the Thomas-Killman Conflict Mode Instrument to learn your style.



Success soars when you can hear the fear and need behind people’s anger, outbursts, and accusations. You will solve the problems and defuse the emotion.

Your potential to turn obstacles into fixes will show everyone that your infinite career potential. You can care for customers. You can collaborate with colleagues. You can break logjams on difficult projects. You can lead others through difficult moments.


No matter how much you fear verbal conflict, you can develop the ability to stay calm. My skills have grown with practice, time, and commitment.


(Of course if you feel the person is going to physically attack, get out. It’s the wise thing to do. I speak in this post about non-physical conflict.)


What growth and success have you had in staying calm? Will you share your story here?



From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™


What’s next? I invite you to connect with me on Google+, LinkedIn, and Twitter. I am happy to answer your people skills questions for great customer service, employee engagement, teamwork and leading change!

 

Other Posts to Help You:
13 People Skills Tips to Rock w/ Career Success
5 Thoughts to Keep You Calm w/ Angry Customers

©2014 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

People Skills Twitter Chat TOPIC: Confidence for New Situations.

WHEN: Sunday Jan. 5, 2014 at 10AM ET. Hashtag: #peopleskills

Here’s a time converter to assist all of you around the globe in converting 10am ET to your local time.

Background on This Chat Topic: Confidence for New Beginnings

Change is all around us. Does it challenge or feed our confidence?


People Skills Twitter Chat Logo

People Skills Twitter Chat: Jan. 5, 2014 at 10am ET. TOPIC: Confidence for New Beginnings

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Join People Skills Twitter Chat: Confidence for New Situations

As we kick off another year of people skills Twitter chat, we will explore confidence for new beginnings.

Some possible questions …

  • What are the sights and sounds of confidence?
  • Is it easier to build confidence by yourself or with others?
  • Have people skills helped you build confidence in new situations or have new situations built your confidence?
  • Do we actually build confidence or does just come over time?
  • How can you help others “feel” more confident?
  • What effect does change have on your confidence?



These are just some questions to get us thinking before we begin the people skills chat this Sunday. Actual questions will post live during the chat.

So bring your personal perspective, your favorite beverage, and join us from around the globe this Sunday in people skills Twitter chat — Jan. 5, 2014 10am ET (Hashtag: #peopleskills) — to explore Confidence for New Beginnings.


I also invite you to continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community and the LinkedIn Group People Skills Succeed to be a part of all the people skills discussions everyday 24×7. Get your people skills community member badge here.



Shout Out of Gratitude

Thanks to all who have participated during 2013 — our first year of people skills Twitter chat (#peopleskills). Special thanks to all the moderators and co-hosts whose generosity and individual perspectives created a collective success.






Hope you will all join People Skills Twitter chat #peopleskills this Sunday Jan. 5, 2014 10am ET/7am PT to explore Confidence for New Beginnings.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Twubs.com or Tweetchat.com, enter hashtag #peopleskills, and sign in to your Twitter account. The venue will insert the hashtag on each of your tweets and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are Tchat.io, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Chat with you this Sun. Jan. 5, 2014 in People Skills Twitter Chat (#peopleskills) — Confidence for New Beginnings.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™

©2013 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com for permission and guidelines. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results. Kate also invites you to connect with her on Google+, LinkedIn, and Twitter. She welcomes your interaction!

Teamwork People Skills: Are You Making It Hard to Be Comfortable w/ Each Other?




When business teams form, they have much to achieve.  Stakes generally range from high to astronomic.   Even infrastructure teams — often mislabeled as less critical — greatly impact business success.  So my question to teams is:

 

Why Work So Hard at Being Uncomfortable w/ Each Other?

Make teamwork interaction easy! The effort is the same.



Teamwork People Skills: Image is Sign Post w/ Blame Words

Teamwork People Skills: Are You Making It Hard?
Image via Istock.

Image licensed from Istock.com.

Teamwork People Skills: Make It Easier to Be Comfortable w/ Each Other

  • Be welcoming not wary.

    Getting to know each other can be fun, exciting, and uplifting. So can working with each other. Start with curiosity and wonder not with statements and pigeon holing.

    “Who is this interesting person?” is a far better mindset than “This person is a ________________________.” The former makes the interaction easy. The latter makes it hard. Why make it hard to be comfortable with each other?


  • Skip the labels.

    Labels shut down communication. “You are overreacting. You are being difficult. You are _______________.” These statements intensify negative emotion. This makes it hard to be comfortable.

    Make teamwork easy. Use your energy to understand instead of label. It closes the gaps. It build bonds of success. Why make it tough?


  • Discuss the exit at the beginning.

    When team members interact, they identify the business goal. Yet disagreements still swirl and people get frustrated because they have different exit outcomes for that interaction. This makes interacting hard!

    Make it easy. Pinpoint the desired exit outcome at the beginning of every interaction. People have many interactions to achieve a business goal. Are you interacting to — identify obstacles, explore options, follow procedure, come to agreement? What exit outcome do you both want for that interaction?

    When you skip this step, you make it hard. After 25 years of developing teams, I can guarantee you that this step will make every teamwork interaction easier!


  • Give up the gossip.

    Gossip is what team members do when they don’t want to or don’t know how to say things directly to each other. Gossip is the outward sign that you have made teamwork and interacting difficult.

    Make it easy. Ask yourselves, is it really necessary to say it? If yes, say it honestly with care not blunt with emotion.

    If it’s not important to say because it may not be true, then don’t say it. Gossip reduces trust. It makes teamwork difficult. Why make it hard to be comfortable with each other?


  • Bury blame forever.

    If there is one thing that can make teamwork interaction hard, it is a culture of blame. Pointing fingers, accusations, and ego assaults are a whole lot of energy spent on being uncomfortable with each other.

    Make it easy. Breed accountability not blame. Replace the daily assaults of “you should have” and “why didn’t you” with open-ended questions to unearth the issues and find solutions. Blame makes interacting difficult. Ownership and accountability make it easy.


  • Speak positively not negatively; forward not back.

    Words matter. They make it easy to interact or difficult to connect.

    Make it easy. State what you need or want instead of what you don’t like. Forward energy is uplifting and exciting. Negativity and a focus on the past make others feel stuck.


  • Appreciate and compliment talents.

    If you really want to make interaction easy, compliment and show appreciation for each others’ strengths. Everyone needs a boost to feel comfortable and a sincere compliment goes a long way.

    I see so many teams living in a neutral culture. They never say “You are so good at __________!” Without this spirit of appreciation, discomfort can flourish.

    Nourish appreciation and you nourish comfort. Here are 25 Talents to Appreciate in Others to get you started.


  • Respect individuality.

    Comparing people to their predecessors or even to each other is energy spent directly on being uncomfortable.

    No two people are alike so why invest time in this folly? It’s a lot like going out on a first date with someone who compares you to their ex. It’s all the discomfort of a first date — times ten.

    Make teamwork interaction easy. Learn about each other without comparison. Even before you do formal team building, get to know each other casually. It builds trust and respect the easy way.








Welcome, explore, respect, learn, and grow. Make interaction easy instead of difficult. The effort is the same and the results far better.

If a team member proves to be unworthy of the team’s trust, you will handle it as needed. Being uncomfortable along the way won’t change this outcome. Making it easy to get to know each other might make a difference and you will also have the comfort of knowing you all gave it your best shot.

“We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same.” ~Carlos Castanada



What else can team members do to be comfortable with each other? I hope you will add your view in the comments section below.

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™

Related Post:
People Skills: Essentials to Seeing Others’ Views
Teamwork: Essential Beliefs to Achieving Interdependence

©2013 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

People skills Twitter Chat TOPIC: Teamwork & Interdependence Hashtag: #peopleskills

WHEN: Sunday July 14, 2013 10AM EDT.

Here’s a time converter to assist all of you around the globe in converting 10am EDT to your local time.

Background on This Chat Topic

Last week, we discussed Independence vs Interdependence — at timely topic for July 4th celebrations in USA. We had so many questions to discuss, we are continuing this week with a focus on Teamwork and Interdependence. This can be teamwork at work, in a community, an association, a volunteer outreach, or even at home!



People Skills Twitter Chat Logo

People Skills Twitter Chat: Teamwork &. Interdependence

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Shout Out of Gratitude

Dave Moore has agreed to co-host this PART II. Thank you Dave!

Also a big thank you to all who participate each week in people skills chat and expand the view on diverse people skills topics.


Join People Skills Twitter Chat Sun. July 14, 2013 10am EDT.

This week we will dig into the topic of people skills and the interdependence of teamwork. The word teamwork is used constantly and yet surprisingly means different things to different people. Is a team automatically interdependent? Is it something you must work at? Can independent people easily function as a team? Hod do you manage an independent person on an otherwise interdependent team? Is interdependence always good on a team? So many questions to discuss!!

So grab your favorite coffee, tea, or other favorite beverage and join us around the globe on this Independence Day weekend in the USA — Sunday July 14, 2013 at 10am ET — to explore Teamwork & Interdependence!


I also invite you continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community to be a part of all the people skills discussions not just on Sundays but everyday 24×7.






Hope you will all join in the #PeopleSkills Twitter chat to explore Teamwork & Interdependence, this Sunday July 14, 2013 10am EDT/7am PDT.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Twitter Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Twubs.com, enter hashtag #peopleskills, and sign in to your Twitter account. Twubs will insert the hashtag automatically for you and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are OneQube, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Chat with you this Sunday July 14, 2013 10am EDT in #PeopleSkills Twitter Chat: People Skills: Teamwork and Interdependence.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™

©2013 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

Leadership #Peopleskills: Inspire Employees to Inspire Themselves Further

Great leaders *don’t lift employees to new heights.

They inspire employees to lift themselves to new heights.


It’s a very important distinction in leadership.




Inspire employees to succeed and inspire each other.

Leadership #Peopleskills: Image is People Jumping

Leadership #Peopleskills: Inspire Others to Soar Not Cling Image by: Flying Pterodactyl

Grateful for image of people by Flying Pterodactyl via Flickr Creative Commons License.


Not cling to you!
Leadership #Peopleskills: Image is small pumpkin leaning on large pumpkin

Leadership #Peopleskills: Inspire to Soar Not Lean

Grateful for image of pumpkins by Sea turtle via Flickr Creative Commons License.



I recently posed the question to leaders: How do you feel when people look to you for a boost of inspiration?

Responses included …

  • Honored, inspired, and humbled. Some said that’s why I’m here!
  • Then some deeper truth emerged as some said: “Honored except with some employees who drown themselves in negativity, do nothing with the inspiration I offer, and expect me to be their crutch or backbone.”


Leadership: How to Be an Inspiration not a Crutch

  1. Ask the employees to inspire you! Leaders become a crutch when they do all the inspiring. The message they send to employees: “Inspiring is my responsibility.” There is no stronger way to get employees to inspire than to sometimes ask them to inspire you! It awakens their potential and opens the door for its appearance.

  2. Ensure you don’t undermine your inspiration with perfectionism. I have witnessed leaders that were visionary, upbeat, and inspirational who also demanded perfection in performance. In response many employees clung to the leader’s every word to avoid criticism and reach perfection in the leader’s eyes.

  3. Address persistently negative attitudes don’t try to convert them. Many leaders subconsciously blame themselves if their inspiration doesn’t reach everyone. They make it their mission to win these employees over. The error is that employees decide what their attitudes will be. Engage employees to resolve tangible issues that frustrate them. Be open to their ideas. Call on their positive attitude in those discussions to find solutions together. Unchecked negativity impacts team morale and performance. Each must choose to contribute a can-do attitude.



Leaders — especially those new to leadership — spend some quiet time defining your role in inspiration. Then have open discussions with your teams about their expectations. Many assume inspiration is the leader’s job until the leader broaches the subject.


You will be presently surprised at how they will participate in inspiration once you ask them AND how it ignites their own motivation.


Be a catalyst of inspiration not a crutch!


From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™

Related Posts:
Leadership: 5 Essentials for Building 21st Century Teams
Leadership: Be a Buoy Not THE Buoy

©2013 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

People skills Twitter Chat TOPIC: Resilience & People Skills Hashtag: #peopleskills

WHEN: Sunday June 30, 2013 10AM EDT.

Here’s a time converter to assist all of you around the globe in converting 10am EDT to your local time.

Background on This Chat Topic

It seems that we are all drawn to people who are confident and upbeat even in difficult times. Resilience attracts as it buoys those who have it and those near them! This brings us to ask: How does one become resilient? What can resilience actually achieve?



People Skills Twitter Chat Logo

People Skills Twitter Chat: Resilience & #Peopleskills

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Shout Out of Gratitude

Twitter connection, LaRae Quy has offered to co-host this chat with me and has provided many great points to explore. LaRae is a former FBI agent and powerful speaker on overcoming obstacles and breaking through barriers. Thank you LaRae!

Also a big thank you to all who participate each week in people skills chat and expand the view on diverse people skills topics.


Join People Skills Twitter Chat Sun. June 30, 2013 10am EDT.

Last week we explored how to inspire others. It was a prequel to this week’s chat: Resilience. It is an important and intriguing topic. It affects interaction and interaction affects it!! Questions come to mind: What if anything suppresses resilience? Does hope play a role in sustaining resilience? Can great people skills create more resilience?

So grab your favorite coffee, tea, or other favorite beverage and join us this Sunday June 30, 2013 at 10am ET for a resilient hour of fun, learning, and growing!


I also invite you continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community to be a part of all the people skills discussions not just on Sundays but everyday 24×7.






Hope you will all join in the #PeopleSkills Twitter chat to explore Resilience in People Skills, this Sunday June 30, 2013 10am EDT/7am PDT.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Twitter Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Twubs.com, enter hashtag #peopleskills, and sign in to your Twitter account. Twubs will insert the hashtag automatically for you and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are OneQube, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Chat with you this Sunday June 30, 2013 10am EDT in #PeopleSkills Twitter Chat: Resilience in People Skills.


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™

©2013 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

People skills Twitter Chat TOPIC: Inspiration vs. Pep Talk Hashtag: #peopleskills

WHEN: Sunday June 23, 2013 10AM EDT.

Here’s a time converter to assist all of you around the globe in converting 10am EDT to your local time.

Background on This Chat Topic
Whether you are a leader in your work, a team member in an empowered organization, or a parent raising children, there are many moments when others look to you to for a morale boost. Sometimes they don’t ask yet you see that spirits are low and you want to help. The question is how?



People Skills Twitter Chat Logo

People Skills Twitter Chat: Inspiration vs. Pep Talk

Image designed by: Kimb Manson Graphics Design for Kate Nasser. All rights reserved.


Shout Out of Gratitude

To my customers over the last 25 years who have taught me much about inspiration as I was inspiring them! Also grateful to La Rae Quy whose topic for next week’s people skills chat (Resilience – June 30th) inspired me to preface that with an exploration of inspiration this week.


Join People Skills Twitter Chat Sun. June 23, 2013 10am EDT.

How do you find the right words to inspire others? Do you use questions or statements? Do you provide inspiration through a pep talk? Do all respond well? Or are there different ways to inspire? There are many books and pundits on inspiration. Yet I want to hear your diverse views and experience on how to inspire others!

What success have you had inspiring others? How did you do it? I don’t speak here about motivating others but truly inspiring them. So grab your favorite coffee, tea, or other beverage and join us this Sunday June 23, 2013 at 10am ET for an exploration of how to lift others up.


I also invite you continue this chat by joining the Google+ People Skills Community to be a part of all the people skills discussions not just on Sundays but everyday 24×7.






Hope you will all join in the #PeopleSkills Twitter chat to explore Inspiration vs. Pep Talk, this Sunday June 23, 2013 10am EDT/7am PDT.

Everyone is welcome! We have only one rule in People Skills Twitter Chat: Respect for all even when we disagree.







TIP: If you have never been in a Twitter chat, you may find it helpful to log on to Twubs.com, enter hashtag #peopleskills, and sign in to your Twitter account. Twubs will insert the hashtag automatically for you and you will see all the tweets on one screen. Other tools available are OneQube, Hootsuite and TweetDeck.

I am the founder and host of the chat and will be happy to answer any questions you have in advance: Email me.


Chat with you this Sunday June 23, 2013 10am EDT in #PeopleSkills Twitter Chat: Inspiration vs. Pep Talk


Until then, as always, I wish you bonds of happiness and success!

From my professional experience to your success,
Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™

©2013 Kate Nasser, CAS, Inc. Somerville, NJ. I appreciate your sharing the link to this post on your social streams. However, if you want to re-post or republish the content of this post, please email info@katenasser.com. Thank you for respecting intellectual capital.


Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach™, delivers coaching, consulting, training, and keynotes on leading change, employee engagement, teamwork, and delivering the ultimate customer service. She turns interaction obstacles into interpersonal success. See this site for workshop outlines, keynote footage, and customer results.

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